Photos reveal extreme damage after a magnitude 7.3 earthquake hit Iraq and Iran

A deadly earthquake shook the mountains along the northern border between Iran and Iraq Sunday evening, sending locals scrambling into the streets and rushing to recover neighbors trapped under the rubble.

The magnitude 7.3 quake killed more than 400 people, according to Reuters, and triggered landslides that have hindered rescue efforts.

Here's what it looks like on the ground.

12 PHOTOS
Photos show extent of damage after earthquake hits Iraq and Iran
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Photos show extent of damage after earthquake hits Iraq and Iran
A man rides a motorcycle past a damaged building following an earthquake in the town of Darbandikhan, near the city of Sulaimaniyah, in the semi-autonomous Kurdistan region, Iraq November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Ako Rasheed
An Iranian man wearing a sling walks by as two others stand amidst the rubble in a street next to a damaged car in the town of Sarpol-e Zahab in the western Kermanshah province near the border with Iraq, on November 14, 2017, following a 7.3-magnitude earthquake that left hundreds killed and thousands homeless two days before. / AFP PHOTO / ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman reacts next to a dead body following an earthquake in Sarpol-e Zahab county in Kermanshah, Iran November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Tasnim News Agency ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.
Rescue workers search for survivors amid the rubble following a 7.3-magnitude earthquake in Sarpol-e Zahab in Iran's western province of Kermanshah on November 13, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / TASNIM NEWS / Farzad MENATI (Photo credit should read FARZAD MENATI/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on November 14, 2017 shows a view of a burnt vehicle and buildings damaged by a 7.3-magnitude earthquake that struck two days before in the town of Sarpol-e Zahab in Iran's western Kermanshah province near the border with Iraq, leaving hundreds killed and thousands homeless. / AFP PHOTO / ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - An Iranian girl looks through a salvaged mirror from a damaged building in the town of Sarpol-e Zahab in the western Kermanshah province near the border with Iraq, on November 14, 2017, following a 7.3-magnitude earthquake that left hundreds killed and thousands homeless two days before. / AFP PHOTO / ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
An Iranian man rests as he lies atop salvaged mattresses and items outside damaged buildings in the town of Sarpol-e Zahab in the western Kermanshah province near the border with Iraq, on November 14, 2017, following a 7.3-magnitude earthquake that left hundreds killed and thousands homeless two days before. / AFP PHOTO / ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
A man looks at a damaged building following an earthquake in the town of Darbandikhan, near the city of Sulaimaniyah, in the semi-autonomous Kurdistan region, Iraq November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Ako Rasheed
A wounded boy is treated following an earthquake in Sarpol-e Zahab county in Kermanshah, Iran November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Tasnim News Agency ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.
Collapsed building is seen in the town of Darbandikhan, near the city of Sulaimaniyah, in the semi-autonomous Kurdistan region, Iraq November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Ako Rasheed
TOPSHOT - An Iranian boy rides a bicycle through the rubble past damaged buildings in the town of Sarpol-e Zahab in Iran's western Kermanshah province near the border with Iraq, on November 14, 2017, following a 7.3-magnitude earthquake that left hundreds killed and thousands homeless two days before. / AFP PHOTO / ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
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