Green Beret killed by strangulation reportedly turned down illegal money from Navy SEALs

The mysterious death of US Army Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar is under scrutiny after the Green Beret, who was killed by strangulation, reportedly declined to accept money from a dubious scheme.

A Daily Beast report, sourced from five service members in the special-operations community, says that a portion of funds used to pay informants in Mali for intelligence were allegedly pocketed by members of the elite SEAL Team Six. The SEALs' actions were reportedly discovered by Melgar, who eventually turned down the money when he was offered a cut.

Prior to his death, Melgar reportedly told his wife of the problems he had with two of the SEALs, and was going to elaborate further when he went home, the Daily Beast said.

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U.S. Green Beret soldiers throughout history
U.S. Green Beret soldiers walk inside the 103rd Philippine Army Brigade camp near Isabela, capital of the southern island of Basilan, after arriving there on February 17, 2002. The Green Beret commandos flew to the island infested with Muslim guerrilas on Sunday and said although they were on a training mission, they were prepared to fight. REUTERS/Erik de Castro EDC/JD
U.S. Green Beret soldiers walk with a Philippine military officer (5th L) after arriving at the 103rd Army Brigade headquarters near Isabela, capital of the southern island of Basilan, on February 17, 2002. The Green Beret commandos flew to the island infested with Muslim guerrilas on Sunday and said although they were on a training mission, they were prepared to fight. REUTERS/Erik de Castro EDC/JD
A Philippine soldier (C) joins two American soldiers as they survey an athletic field for possible use as a landing area in Isabela on Basilan island February 17, 2002, in the southern Philippines. United States Green Beret commandos flew into Basilan, home to the Abu Sayyaf Musilm guerrila group and said although they were on a training mission, they were prepared to fight. REUTERS/Erik de Castro EDC/RCS
A U.S. Green Beret commando stands guard while colleagues alight from a MH-47 helicopter on Basilan island February 17, 2002. [United States Green Beret commandos flew into Basilan to hold training exercises with their Philippine counterparts.]
Members of the Green Berets observe a moment of silence during the Horse Soldier Monument Rededication ceremony in front the World Trade Center in New York October 19, 2012. The Green Berets were some 200 soldiers who joined the Northern Alliance against the Taliban in Afghanistan in 2001 and used horses to move about the rugged terrain much more effectively than conventional modes of transportation. The statue was erected in honor of these soldiers. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY ANIMALS ANNIVERSARY)
U.S. GREEN BERET SOLDIERS CARRY EQUIPMENT INSIDE A PHILIPPINE ARMY CAMP AFTER ARRIVING ON BASILAN ISLAND. U.S. Green Beret soldiers carry their equipment inside the 103rd Philippine Army Brigade camp near Isabela, capital of the southern island of Basilan, after arriving there on February 17, 2002. The Green Beret commandos flew to the island infested with Muslim guerrilas on Sunday and said although they were on a training mission, they were prepared to fight. REUTERS/Erik de Castro
A detachment of 1st Special Forces Group Green Berets from Ft. Lewis, Washington carry the flag draped coffin of Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Chapman during burial services at Tahoma National Cemetery in Covington, Washington, January 11, 2002. Chapman was the first American killed by direct enemy fire in Afghanistan.
A U.S. Green Beret soldier takes cover as he helps secure the perimetre around where his colleagues were landing at the 103rd Army Brigade headquarters near Isabela, capital of the southern island of Basilan, on February 17, 2002. The Green Beret commandos flew to the island infested with Muslim guerrilas on Sunday and said although they were on a training mission, they were prepared to fight. REUTERS/Erik de Castro EDC/JD
MARBLEHEAD, MA - JUNE 27: U.S. Army Special Forces soldiers carry the casket of their fallen comrade, Army Staff Sgt. Christopher Piper June 27, 2005 during his funeral procession in Marblehead, Massachusetts. Piper, a special forces soldier, was killed by a roadside bomb in Afghanistan earlier this month. (Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images)
TALOQUAN, NORTHERN AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 28: U.S. Army Special Forces soldier nicknamed 'Cowboy' and others secure an airstrip during an operation August 28, 2002 in the town of Taloquan in Northern Afghanistan. U.S. Special Forces have recently begun to step up their presence in Northern Afghanistan to more aggressively pursue possible al Qaeda and Taliban fugitives they believe to be operating in the region. (Photo by Scott Nelson/Getty Images)
KUNDUZ, NORTHERN AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 26: Spent cartridges fly as U.S. Army Special Forces soldier nicknamed 'Bones' practices his marksmanship with an M-4 automatic rifle at a range near the town of Kunduz August 26, 2002 in Northern Afghanistan. U.S. Special Forces have recently begun to step up their presence in Northern Afghanistan to more aggressively pursue possible al Qaeda and Taliban fugitives they believe to be operating in the region. The horseback patrols are an invaluable tool for the soldiers, allowing them to patrol narrow streets or alleys as well as other terrain that would otherwise be inaccessable by truck. (Photo by Scott Nelson/Getty Images)
KUNDUZ, NORTHERN AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 26: U.S. Army Special Forces soldier nicknamed 'Mike' (R) raises his arms in celebration after gunning down a target with his side arm while on a target range near the town of Kunduz August 26, 2002 in Northern Afghanistan. U.S. Special Forces have recently begun to step up their presence in Northern Afghanistan to more aggressively pursue possible al Qaeda and Taliban fugitives they believe to be operating in the region. (Photo by Scott Nelson/Getty Images)
TALOQUAN, NORTHERN AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 28: U.S. Army Special Forces helicopters land on an airstrip during an operation August 28, 2002 in the town of Taloquan in Northern Afghanistan. U.S. Special Forces have recently begun to step up their presence in Northern Afghanistan to more aggressively pursue possible al Qaeda and Taliban fugitives they believe to be operating in the region. (Photo by Scott Nelson/Getty Images)
PHILIPPINES - FEBRUARY 22: Us Special Forces In The Philippines On February 22Th, 2002 In Island Of Basilan, Philippines. On Basilan Island. The 160-Men Group Of Us Green Berets Is Complete. They Were Scattered In Different Camps Surrounding Members Of The Abu Sayyaf Islamist Group In The Southwest Jungle Near Maluso. (Photo by Patrick AVENTURIER/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
405876 02: U.S. Army Green Berets, acting as military advisors, talk before a ceremony at a military academy May 27, 2002 in the Georgian capital of Tbilisi. The U.S. Army innagurated a two-year program in an attempt to upgrade the Georgian military to a force capable of taking on terrorists allegedly holed up in the former Soviet republic. (Photo by Getty Images)
405871 04: Afghan soldiers negotiate an obstacle course as part of a competition at an Afghan National Army (ANA) training facility May 27, 2002 in Kabul, Afghanistan. U.S. Army Green Berets are currently conducting a ten week training course for the Afghan Army in the hope that a better trained military will mean a more stable Afghanistan. (Photo by Scott Nelson/Getty Images)
405871 01: An unidentified U.S. Army Green Beret from the 3rd Special Forces Group from Fort Bragg, NC watches as Afghan soldiers do pushups as part of a competition at an Afghan National Army (ANA) training facility May 27, 2002 in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Green Berets are currently conducting a ten week training course for the Afghan Army in the hope that a better trained military will mean a more stable Afghanistan. (Photo by Scott Nelson/Getty Images)
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Following Meglar's death, suspicions were raised after two SEALs alleged Melgar was participating in combative exercises, the military's version of martial arts, while drunk, the report continued. However, Melgar's autopsy report said that there were no drugs or alcohol in his system, a former military official said to the Daily Beast.

The New York Times first reported that two SEALs were being investigated, due to the circumstances of the incident. According to The Times, investigators were looking into whether Melgar was strangled, and his superiors believed foul play may have been involved. Melgar's death was determined to have been "a homicide by asphyxiation," according to military officials cited by The Times.

The two SEALs were reportedly flown out of Mali and placed on administrative leave, shortly after Melgar's death.

Melgar, a 34-year-old Texan, deployed to Afghanistan twice. He was assigned to Mali with the 3rd Special Forces Group to help train locals and support counterterrorism operations.

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