FEMA offers to send Puerto Ricans to the US mainland

The Federal Emergency Management Agency is offering to take Puerto Ricans displaced after Hurricane Maria to New York or Florida. But many don't seem interested.

FEMA's Transitional Sheltering Assistance program helps displaced residents find short-term housing while their homes are repaired. Because Puerto Rico has few options available, the agency says it's willing to cover the cost to send residents to hotels or motels on the U.S. mainland.

FEMA says it will provide transportation to and from the island, as well as pay for the cost of short-term housing.

A FEMA federal coordinating officer told CBS the agency spoke with 300 families about the program Tuesday. Just 1 in 10 were interested.

SEE MORE: Puerto Rico Will End Controversial Contract With Montana Energy Firm

RELATED: Puerto Rico's damage from above

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Puerto Rico's damage from above
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Puerto Rico's damage from above
Buildings damaged by Hurricane Maria are seen in Lares, Puerto Rico, October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Remains of a shed is scattered over a basketball court after Hurricane Maria near Loiza, Puerto Rico, October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
The contents of a damaged home can be seen as recovery efforts continue following Hurricane Maria near the town of Comerio, Puerto Rico, October 7, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Buildings and trees damaged by the winds of Hurricane Maria are seen near Lares, Puerto Rico, October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A damaged home is seen as recovery efforts continue following Hurricane Maria near Orocovis, Puerto Rico, October 7, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A damaged home is seen among blown down trees following Hurricane Maria in San Sebastian, Puerto Rico, October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Sand is seen along a road after being pushed there by Hurricane Maria near Loiza, Puerto Rico, October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
The contents of a damaged home can be seen as recovery efforts continue following Hurricane Maria near the town of Comerio, Puerto Rico, October 7, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Buildings damaged by Hurricane Maria are seen in Lares, Puerto Rico, October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Trees damaged by the winds of Hurricane Maria are seen in a valley near Lares, Puerto Rico, October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Plywood is used on buildings to repair damage from Hurricane Maria near Loiza, Puerto Rico, October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Residents fill containers with water from a creek as recovery efforts continue following Hurricane Maria near the town of Comerio, Puerto Rico, October 7, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Residents fill containers with water from a creek as recovery efforts continue following Hurricane Maria near town of Comerio, Puerto Rico, October 7, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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More than 100,000 people have reportedly already left Puerto Rico for Florida since Hurricane Maria hit the U.S. territory in September.

Although conditions have improved, as of Thursday, roughly 12 percent of those in Puerto Rico still don't have water, and more than half the island is still without power.

FEMA says it could take several weeks to figure out the logistics for the displaced residents who accept its offer.

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