The ritzy 'jail' where the arrested Saudi royals are being held

Nearly 50 dignitaries and members of the royal family were arrested in a reform purge in Saudi Arabia over the weekend by Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman and sent to the Ritz-Carlton, Riyadh — a five-star resort.

Hotel guests of the Ritz-Carlton in Saudi Arabia's capitol city, Riyadh, had their stays interrupted Saturday night when the staff asked them to gather in the lobby with their belongings. They were being transferred, they found out, to other area hotels so that the recently arrested Saudi royalty and elites could move in for their detainment, The Guardian Reported.

The 50-acre, 500-suite resort - now the world's most lavish prison - is one of the country's "most majestic five-star hotels," its website says. And it's easy to see why.

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Ritz-Carlton in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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Ritz-Carlton in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Saudi men walk out of the entrance to the Ritz-Carlton Hotel, where U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is staying in Riyadh on March 4, 2013. From Saudi Arabia, Kerry heads into the homestretch of his lengthy first official trip abroad, traveling next to the United Arab Emirates and then Qatar before returning to Washington. AFP PHOTO/JACQUELYN MARTIN/POOL (Photo credit should read JACQUELYN MARTIN/AFP/Getty Images)
A view shows the Ritz-Carlton hotel's entrance gate in the diplomatic quarter of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Faisal Al Nasser
Pictures of U.S. President Donald Trump and Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud are projected on the front of the Ritz-Carlton, where Trump is staying in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia May 20, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
US and Saudi officials walk in the hallway of the Ritz Carlton hotel in the capital Riyadh on May 21, 2017, during a visit of the US president. / AFP PHOTO / GIUSEPPE CACACE (Photo credit should read GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP/Getty Images)
A view shows the Ritz-Carlton hotel in the diplomatic quarter of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Faisal Al Nasser
The motorcade carrying US Secretary of State John Kerry arrives at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel early in the morning in Riyadh on January 23, 2016, after a previous stop in Switzerland. The top US diplomat arrived from Switzerland in Saudi Arabia and next heads to Laos, Cambodia and China. AFP PHOTO / POOL / Jacquelyn Martin / AFP / POOL / JACQUELYN MARTIN (Photo credit should read JACQUELYN MARTIN/AFP/Getty Images)
A worker cleans a fountain at the entrance of the Ritz Carlton hotel as Arab officials attend the 30th Conference of the Arab Interior Minister's Council in Riyadh on March 13, 2013. AFP PHOTO/FAYEZ NURELDINE (Photo credit should read FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)
Visitors stand next to a Ferrari luxury car displayed during the 2016 World Luxury Expo Riyadh 2016 held at the Ritz-Carlton hotel in the capital Riyadh, on March 30, 2016. / AFP / FAYEZ NURELDINE (Photo credit should read FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)
Pictures of U.S. President Donald Trump and Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud are projected on the front of the Ritz-Carlton, where Trump is staying in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia May 20, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
US and Saudi officials walk in the hallway of the Ritz Carlton hotel in the capital Riyadh on May 21, 2017, during a visit of the US president. / AFP PHOTO / GIUSEPPE CACACE (Photo credit should read GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP/Getty Images)
US Secret Service agents monitor the area from the roof of the Ritz Carlton hotel in the Saudi capital Riyadh on May 21, 2017, during a visit of the US president. / AFP PHOTO / Fayez Nureldine (Photo credit should read FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)
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People pay anywhere from $311 to $1,039 a night to be guests at the Riyadh Ritz-Carlton. Its room offerings include two-bedroom "royal suites" with king-sized beds and 42-inch TVs.

There are 62,000 square feet of event space, two ballrooms, a spa, indoor heated pool, bowling alley, six restaurants and a gym.

The hotel boasts Internet access throughout its grounds but a notification on its website warns potential guests that phone and wireless services are not available at the moment.

"Due to unforeseen circumstances," the note reads, "the hotel's internet and telephone lines are currently disconnected until further notice."

Prince Salman executed the arrests Saturday night in an effort to crack down on corruption in the country.

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Daily life in Saudi Arabia
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Daily life in Saudi Arabia
A woman speaks on the phone as men ride a motorcycle on a cloudy day in Riyadh November 17, 2013. Picture taken November 17, 2013. REUTERS/Faisal Al Nasser (SAUDI ARABIA - Tags: SOCIETY)
A man uses a makeshift aerial lift to transport a cart between Fifa Mountains, in Jazan, south of Saudi Arabia, April 8, 2017. Picture taken April 8, 2017. REUTERS/Mohamed Al Hwaity
A picture taken on June 7, 2017 shows Al-Faisaliah Tower in the centre of the Saudi capital, Riyadh. / AFP PHOTO / FAYEZ NURELDINE (Photo credit should read FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)
Foreign workers on a rest day shop for fresh food products from a market stall in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016. Saudi Arabia is working to reduce the Middle Easts biggest economys reliance on oil, which provides three-quarters of government revenue, as part of a plan for the biggest economic shakeup since the countrys founding. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A woman uses her mobile phone in a cafe in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia October 6, 2016. Picture taken October 6, 2016. REUTERS/Faisal Al Nasser
A Saudi man reads a newspaper at a coffee shop in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia September 27, 2016. REUTERS/Faisal Al Nasser
Clouds move over the Riyadh skyline November 17, 2013. Picture taken November 17, 2013. REUTERS/Faisal Al Nasser (SAUDI ARABIA - Tags: CITYSCAPE SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
Veiled Saudi women take photos of their children during a ceremony to celebrate Saudi Arabia's Independence Day in Riyadh September 23, 2009. REUTERS/Fahad Shadeed (SAUDI ARABIA SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)
Visitors look at books during the Riyadh Book Fair at the International Exhibition Center in Riyadh, March 7, 2013. REUTERS/Susan Baaghil (SAUDI ARABIA - Tags: SOCIETY)
A man display dates for sale during the Festival of Dates ahead of the holy month of Ramadan, in Buraidah, north of Riyadh August 18, 2009. Muslims around the world abstain from eating, drinking and conducting sexual relations from sunrise to sunset during Ramadan, the holiest month in the Islamic calendar. REUTERS/Fahad Shadeed (SAUDI ARABIA SOCIETY)
Light trails from automobile traffic traveling along the King Fahd highway, left, and Olaya Street, right, lead towards the Kingdom Tower, center rear, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016. Saudi Arabia is working to reduce the Middle Easts biggest economys reliance on oil, which provides three-quarters of government revenue, as part of a plan for the biggest economic shakeup since the countrys founding. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Women wait outside a shop in the Saudi capital Riyadh on February 17, 2009. Saudis have cheered King Abdullah's sweeping government shakeup as a bold step forward, after he sacked two powerful conservative religious figures and named the country's first-ever woman minister. The Saudi monarch announced the first major government shakeup on February 14 since he became king in August 2005, naming four new ministers, changing a number of top judiciary chiefs and shaking up the Ulema Council, the leading clerics whose interpretations of Islamic rules underpin daily life in the kingdom. AFP PHOTO/STR (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)
A Saudi family plays in the sand dunes near Buraydah, 400 kms northwest Riyadh on March 11, 2016. / AFP / FAYEZ NURELDINE (Photo credit should read FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images)
Automobile traffic moves along the King Fahd highway in the late evening in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016. Saudi Arabia is working to reduce the the Middle Easts biggest economys reliance on oil, which provides three-quarters of government revenue, as part of a plan for the biggest economic shakeup since the countrys founding. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The late evening sun sets overs residential and commercial buildings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016. Saudi Arabia is working to reduce the Middle Easts biggest economys reliance on oil, which provides three-quarters of government revenue, as part of a plan for the biggest economic shakeup since the countrys founding. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Customers use automated teller machines (ATM) inside the Al Rajhi Bank in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016. Saudi Arabia is working to reduce the Middle Easts biggest economys reliance on oil, which provides three-quarters of government revenue, as part of a plan for the biggest economic shakeup since the countrys founding. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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A prince who headed the Saudi National Guard and the economy minister were among those removed from their positions. The purge is being viewed by some as Prince Salman's attempt to consolidate power, the New York Times reported.

Because of their high-rank, those arrested could not be thrown in regular jail without severely insulting them, according to Saudi customs. So the Ritz-Carlton - the site of a recent investment conference that the crown prince attended - was the next best option.

"He couldn't have put them in the jail," a senior official told The Guardian. "And he would have known that. So this was the most dignified solution he could find."

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