Donna Brazile criticizes Barack Obama's 'titanic ego' in her new book

Former interim DNC Chairwoman Donna Brazile said the Democratic party was "leeched of its vitality" by former President Barack Obama and others in the months leading up to the 2016 presidential campaign.

“We had three Democratic parties: The party of Barack Obama, the party of Hillary Clinton, and this weak little vestige of a party led by [Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz] that was doing a very poor job getting people who were not president elected,” Brazile wrote in her newly released 2016 campaign tell-all, titled  “Hacks: The Inside Story of the Break-ins and Breakdowns That Put Donald Trump in the White House."

Brazile accused the 44th president of caring "deeply about his image" and using the committee to act as a bank for his personal "political expenses."

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Obama "used the party to provide for political expenses like gifts to donors, and political travel," Brazile wrote, adding that the politician also used DNC funds for "his pollster and focus groups" later into his second term although he couldn't run for president again.

"This was not working to strengthen the party. He left it in debt. Hillary bailed it out so that she could control it, and Debbie went along with all of this because she liked the power and perks of being a chair but not the responsibilities," Brazile wrote.

She added that although she believed Obama, Clinton and Schultz loved the Democratic Party dearly, they "leeched it of its vitality and were continuing to do so."

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“I knew that these three did not do this with malice. I knew if you woke any of them up in the middle of the night to ask them how they felt about the Democratic Party they would answer with sincerity that they loved this party and all it had done for the country and for them. Yet they had leeched it of its vitality and were continuing to do so,” Brazile wrote.

Brazile, who assumed the DNC role in the interim following Schultz's resignation in 2016 after a trove of leaked emails showed the committee conspired to sabotage Senator Bernie Sanders's campaign, has been facing heat for speaking critically against members in her own party in recent months.

"As I saw it, these three titanic egos–Barack, Hillary, and Debbie–had stripped the party to a shell for their own purposes,” Brazile wrote.

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NEWARK, NJ - OCTOBER 19: Former U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands after speaking at a rally in support of Democratic candidate Phil Murphy, who is running against Republican Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno for the governor of New Jersey, on October 19, 2017 in Newark, New Jersey. In Obama's first return to the campaign trail, the former president is stumping for Democratic gubernatorial candidates in New Jersey and Virginia as they prepare for next month's elections. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Former U.S. President Barack Obama campaigns in support of Virginia Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam (R), Democratic candidate for governor, at a rally with supporters in Richmond, Virginia, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Former president Barack Obama rallies with New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy in Newark, New Jersey, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former US President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign rally for Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Ralph Northam (unseen) in Richmond, Virginia October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Former president Barack Obama acknowledges the crowd after rallying with New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy in Newark, New Jersey, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former president Barack Obama speaks during a rally for New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy in Newark, New Jersey, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former U.S. President Barack Obama campaigns in support of Virginia Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam (R), Democratic candidate for governor, at a rally with supporters in Richmond, Virginia, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
A young boy awaits the arrival of former President Barack Obama to speak at a rally with New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy in Newark, New Jersey U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy reacts as former President Barack Obama speaks during a rally in Newark, New Jersey U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former President Barack Obama greets supporters after joining New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy at a rally in Newark, New Jersey U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former President Barack Obama greets New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy in Newark, New Jersey U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former US President Barack Obama takes photos with members of the crowd as he campaigns for New Jersey Democratic gubernatorial candidate Phil Murphy in Newark, New Jersey on October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
Former US President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign rally for Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Ralph Northam (unseen) in Richmond, Virginia October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Attendees react as former president Barack Obama greets supporters after joining New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy at a rally in Newark, New Jersey, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former president Barack Obama rallies with New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy in Newark, New Jersey, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former US President Barack Obama (R) campaigns for New Jersey Democratic gubernatorial candidate Phil Murphy in Newark, New Jersey on October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
Former US President Barack Obama campaigns for New Jersey Democratic gubernatorial candidate Phil Murphy and his running mate Sheila Oliver in Newark, New Jersey on October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
NEWARK, NJ - OCTOBER 19: Former U.S. President Barack Obama walks on stage in support of Democratic candidate Phil Murphy, who is running against Republican Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno for the governor of New Jersey, on October 19, 2017 in Newark, New Jersey. In Obama's first return to the campaign trail, the former president is stumping for Democratic gubernatorial candidates in New Jersey and Virginia as they prepare for next month's elections. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Audience members take pictures of former US President Barack Obama as he campaigns for New Jersey Democratic gubernatorial candidate Phil Murphy in Newark, New Jersey on October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
NEWARK, NJ - OCTOBER 19: Democratic candidate Phil Murphy, who is running against Republican Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno for the governor of New Jersey , speaks at a rally on October 19, 2017 in Newark, New Jersey. Murphy was later joined by former President Barack Obama This is Obama's first return to the campaign trail to stump for Democratic gubernatorial candidates in New Jersey and Virginia as they prepare for next month's elections. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEWARK, NJ - OCTOBER 19: Former U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands after speaking at a rally in support of Democratic candidate Phil Murphy, who is running against Republican Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno for the governor of New Jersey, on October 19, 2017 in Newark, New Jersey. In Obama's first return to the campaign trail, the former president is stumping for Democratic gubernatorial candidates in New Jersey and Virginia as they prepare for next month's elections. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Former U.S. President Barack Obama campaigns in support of Virginia Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam, Democratic candidate for governor, at a rally with supporters in Richmond, Virginia, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Former US President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign rally for Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Ralph Northam (R) in Richmond, Virginia October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
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