Obamacare registrations hit record total days after enrollment began

A record number of Americans have signed up for Obamacare in the first few days of open enrollment — despite White House cuts to outreach and promotion.

More than 200,000 people signed up Nov. 1, a Trump administration source told The Hill, which first reported on the surge.

That’s double the 100,000 who signed up on the first day of enrollment a year ago.

Web traffic to the healthcare.gov site that enrolls people in the Affordable Care Act also set a new record. Roughly 1 million visitors browsed the site, compared to 750,000 on Nov. 1 a year ago, The Hill said.

RELATED: Republicans who voted 'No' on repeal of Obamacare

8 PHOTOS
Republicans who voted 'No' on repeal of Obamacare
See Gallery
Republicans who voted 'No' on repeal of Obamacare

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-AK

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Texas

(Photo by Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-WV

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Senator John McCain, R-Ariz.

(Photo via REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio

(Photo via REUTERS/John Sommers II)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The rush to enroll came after a social media push designed to let people know ACA is still the law of the land — despite President Trump’s rollbacks of several key parts of the plan.

“Starting today, you can sign up for 2018 health coverage. Head on over to http://HealthCare.gov and find a plan that meets your needs,” former President Barack Obama tweeted Nov. 1.

Democrats had worried that the Trump administration’s cutbacks to outreach and advertising would result in lower enrollment.

The window to sign up for health care for 2018 opened Nov. 1 and will close Dec. 15. That’s about half as long as the enrollment period under Obama.

RELATED: Obama hits campaign trail for first time since leaving White House

24 PHOTOS
Obama hits campaign trail for first time since leaving White House
See Gallery
Obama hits campaign trail for first time since leaving White House
NEWARK, NJ - OCTOBER 19: Former U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands after speaking at a rally in support of Democratic candidate Phil Murphy, who is running against Republican Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno for the governor of New Jersey, on October 19, 2017 in Newark, New Jersey. In Obama's first return to the campaign trail, the former president is stumping for Democratic gubernatorial candidates in New Jersey and Virginia as they prepare for next month's elections. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Former U.S. President Barack Obama campaigns in support of Virginia Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam (R), Democratic candidate for governor, at a rally with supporters in Richmond, Virginia, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Former president Barack Obama rallies with New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy in Newark, New Jersey, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former US President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign rally for Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Ralph Northam (unseen) in Richmond, Virginia October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Former president Barack Obama acknowledges the crowd after rallying with New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy in Newark, New Jersey, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former president Barack Obama speaks during a rally for New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy in Newark, New Jersey, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former U.S. President Barack Obama campaigns in support of Virginia Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam (R), Democratic candidate for governor, at a rally with supporters in Richmond, Virginia, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
A young boy awaits the arrival of former President Barack Obama to speak at a rally with New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy in Newark, New Jersey U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy reacts as former President Barack Obama speaks during a rally in Newark, New Jersey U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former President Barack Obama greets supporters after joining New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy at a rally in Newark, New Jersey U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former President Barack Obama greets New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy in Newark, New Jersey U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former US President Barack Obama takes photos with members of the crowd as he campaigns for New Jersey Democratic gubernatorial candidate Phil Murphy in Newark, New Jersey on October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
Former US President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign rally for Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Ralph Northam (unseen) in Richmond, Virginia October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Attendees react as former president Barack Obama greets supporters after joining New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy at a rally in Newark, New Jersey, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former president Barack Obama rallies with New Jersey Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Jim Murphy in Newark, New Jersey, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Former US President Barack Obama (R) campaigns for New Jersey Democratic gubernatorial candidate Phil Murphy in Newark, New Jersey on October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
Former US President Barack Obama campaigns for New Jersey Democratic gubernatorial candidate Phil Murphy and his running mate Sheila Oliver in Newark, New Jersey on October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
NEWARK, NJ - OCTOBER 19: Former U.S. President Barack Obama walks on stage in support of Democratic candidate Phil Murphy, who is running against Republican Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno for the governor of New Jersey, on October 19, 2017 in Newark, New Jersey. In Obama's first return to the campaign trail, the former president is stumping for Democratic gubernatorial candidates in New Jersey and Virginia as they prepare for next month's elections. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Audience members take pictures of former US President Barack Obama as he campaigns for New Jersey Democratic gubernatorial candidate Phil Murphy in Newark, New Jersey on October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
NEWARK, NJ - OCTOBER 19: Democratic candidate Phil Murphy, who is running against Republican Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno for the governor of New Jersey , speaks at a rally on October 19, 2017 in Newark, New Jersey. Murphy was later joined by former President Barack Obama This is Obama's first return to the campaign trail to stump for Democratic gubernatorial candidates in New Jersey and Virginia as they prepare for next month's elections. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEWARK, NJ - OCTOBER 19: Former U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands after speaking at a rally in support of Democratic candidate Phil Murphy, who is running against Republican Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno for the governor of New Jersey, on October 19, 2017 in Newark, New Jersey. In Obama's first return to the campaign trail, the former president is stumping for Democratic gubernatorial candidates in New Jersey and Virginia as they prepare for next month's elections. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Former U.S. President Barack Obama campaigns in support of Virginia Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam, Democratic candidate for governor, at a rally with supporters in Richmond, Virginia, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Former US President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign rally for Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Ralph Northam (R) in Richmond, Virginia October 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Last week Standard & Poor's forecast that 2018 signups might drop by as much as 1.6 million people from the 12.2 who registered for ACA the prior year — thanks to uncertainty about what Trump will do to the program.

Trump and GOP lawmakers have made dismantling Obamacare a priority — even though Republican efforts to repeal the law without a replacement have so far stalled on Capitol Hill.

Trump recently cut off important Obamacare subsidies to insurance companies to help lower out-of-pocket medical costs for low-income Americans.

The President also signed executive orders that dialed back certain requirements on insurance companies and de-funded outreach efforts to let people know the dates of the enrollment period.

RELATED: States with the highest and lowest Trump job approval ratings

35 PHOTOS
States with the highest and lowest Trump job approval ratings
See Gallery
States with the highest and lowest Trump job approval ratings

Idaho

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Utah

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Montana

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Wyoming

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

North Dakota

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo by Ben Harding via Getty Images)

South Dakota

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Nebraska

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Kansas

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Shutterstock)

Oklahoma

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Arkansas

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Louisiana

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Alabama

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

South Carolina

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo by Sean Pavone via Getty Images)

Tennessee 

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Kentucky

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

West Virginia

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo by Stan Rohrer via Getty Images)

Alaska

Approval rating: 50% or higher

(Photo via Getty Images)

Massachusetts

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Vermont

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Rhode Island

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo by Kenneth C. Zirkel via Getty Images)

Connecticut

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

New Jersey

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

New York

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Delaware

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Maryland

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Virginia

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Illinois

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Minnesota

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Colorado

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

New Mexico

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Washington

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Oregon

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

California

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

Hawaii

Approval rating: Below 40%

(Photo via Getty Images)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.