Woman photographed flipping off President Trump's motorcade is now unemployed

A woman who gave the middle finger to President Donald Trump and his motorcade got the same treatment from her employer.

Juli Briskman, who flipped the bird at the passing motorcade as she shared the road on her bike, was fired from her job with a government contractor, the Washington Post reported. Briskman, 50, who works in marketing, was photographed in mid-flip-off by a White House press photographer who travels with the president, who was leaving his golf course in Sterling, Va. The company was later identified as Akima LLC by the Huffington Post.

The photo quickly went viral, and Briskman’s one-fingered salute became material on news programs and late-night talk shows. She also used the photo as her profile picture on Twitter and Facebook

When Briskman went to work last week Monday, she gave the human resources department a heads-up that she was the unidentified cyclist in the photo. The next day, company executives called her into a meeting, in which they fired her for violating the company’s social media policy, she told the Huffington Post in an interview, .

 They then escorted her out of the building as she carried a box of her possessions.

“I wasn’t even at work when I did that,” Briskman told the Washington Post. “But they told me I violated the code of conduct policy.”

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Briskman, who had only worked at the government contractor for a little more than six months, told the Huffington Post that her bosses told her, “‘We’re separating from you.’ Basically, you cannot have ‘lewd’ or ‘obscene’ things in your social media. So they were calling flipping him off ‘obscene.’”

She noted to the company’s executives that she wasn’t on the job when the photo was taken, and that her social media pages are personal and don’t mention her employer. But she said they told her that because Akima is a government contractor, the photo could have a negative impact on their business.

Her bosses, who have not responded to requests for comment from the Washington Post and the Huffington Post, reportedly cited the blue-highlighted section 4.3 of their social media policy when they fired her.

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That section reads: “Covered Social Media Activity that contains discriminatory, obscene malicious or threatening content, is knowingly false, create [sic] a hostile work environment, or similar inappropriate or unlawful conduct will not be tolerated and will be subject to discipline up to an including termination of employment.”

But Briskman is irked that a male colleague kept his job after recently using obscene language on Facebook — and his profile mentioned Akima LLC in its cover photo, according to the Huffington Post. She said the colleague was reprimanded for calling someone “a f*****g Libtard a*****e” on Facebook but was allowed to delete the post and keep his job.

“How is that any less ‘obscene’ than me flipping off the president?” Briskman asked. “How is that fair?

RELATED: President Trump arrives in Japan: 

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Donald Trump arrives in Japan
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump board Air Force One to depart for Japan from Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, U.S. November 4, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive on Air Force One at U.S. Air Force Yokota base in Fussa, on the outskirts of Tokyo, Japan, November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive on Air Force One at U.S. Air Force Yokota base in Fussa, on the outskirts of Tokyo, Japan, November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive on Air Force One at U.S. Air Force Yokota base in Fussa, on the outskirts of Tokyo, Japan, November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive at U.S. Air Force Yokota base in Fussa, on the outskirts of Tokyo, Japan, November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump addresses members of U.S. military services and Japan Self-Defense Force (JSDF) at U.S. Air Force Yokota Air Base in Fussa, on the outskirts of Tokyo, Japan, November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
U.S. President Donald Trump addresses members of U.S. military services and Japan Self-Defense Force (JSDF) at U.S. Air Force Yokota Air Base in Fussa, on the outskirts of Tokyo, Japan, November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
Supporters hold signs as they wait for U.S. President Donald Trump outside Kasumigaseki Country Club in Kawagoe, north of Tokyo, Japan November 5, 2017. Trump is due to play golf at the club with Japan?s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. REUTERS/Issei Kato
U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Japan?s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Kasumigaseki Country Club in Kawagoe, north of Tokyo, Japan November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe hold hats they signed, reading "Donald & Shinzo Make Alliance Even Greater" before lunch and a round of golf at Kasumigaseki Country Club in Kawagoe, Japan November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
US President Donald Trump (L) is welcomed by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe upon his arrival at the Kasumigaseki Country Club in Kawagoe, near Tokyo, Japan, 05 November 2017. REUTERS/Frank Robichon/Pool
U.S. President Donald Trump departs after a round of golf with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Kasumigaseki Country Club in Kawagoe, Japan November 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump gestures to Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as Japanese professional golfer Hideki Matsuyama looks on, as they play golf at the Kasumigaseki Country Club in Kawagoe, north of Tokyo, Japan, in this photo taken and released by Japan's Cabinet Public Relations Office via Kyodo November 5, 2017. Mandatory credit Japan's Cabinet Public Relations Office via Kyodo/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. MANDATORY CREDIT. JAPAN OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN JAPAN.
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