Women vomit, march, then vie for office in record numbers under Trump

NEW YORK, Nov 1 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - When late-night election returns showed Donald Trump winning the U.S. presidency last November, Laura Moser vomited and Christine Lui Chen crawled into bed to cling to her young daughter.

Then they got down to business and joined the thousands of women who have responded to the Trump presidency by running for political office.

More than 20,000 women in the United States with an interest in running for office have contacted Emily's List, an advocacy group supporting female candidates, since the November election.

The number is unprecedented. In the two years before the 2016 election day, 920 women - also a record - contacted the group, a spokeswoman said.

RELATED: The world's most powerful women

11 PHOTOS
The world's most powerful women
See Gallery
The world's most powerful women

10. Ginni Rometty: CEO, IBM, US

Photo credit: Reuters 

9. Ana Patricia Botín: Chair, Santander Group, Banco Santander, Spain 

Photo credit: Getty

8. Christine Lagarde: Managing Director, International Monetary Fund, US 

Photo credit: Getty

7. Abigail Johnson: CEO, Fidelity Investments, US

Photo credit: Getty

6. Susan Wojcicki: CEO, YouTube, US

Photo credit: Getty

5. Mary Barra: CEO, General Motors, US 

Photo credit: Getty

4. Sheryl Sandberg: COO, Facebook, US

Photo credit: Getty

3. Melinda Gates: Co-Chair, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, US 

Photo credit: Getty

2. Theresa May: Prime Minister, UK 

Photo credit: Getty

1. Angela Merkel: Chancellor, Germany 

Photo credit: Getty

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"We have never seen anything like this before in our 32-year history," said Alexandra De Luca, a spokeswoman for Emily's List, which supports women candidates in the Democratic Party who back abortion rights.

During the presidential campaign against Democrat Hillary Clinton, Trump was criticized for insulting women and for remarks, captured on video, bragging about groping them.

His administration has proposed or undertaken measures that many see as harmful to women's rights, such as reducing access to abortion and birth control, health insurance and childcare.

Millions of women protested in demonstrations around the world the day after Trump was sworn into office in January.

That's when Chen says she decided to run for office.

SEE ALSO: Democrats sue to get documents on Trump's Washington hotel

"I made the choice literally 13 hours after coming home from the (Washington) D.C. women's' march," Chen said in a new documentary that follows her bid for New Jersey state Senate.

The campaigns of Chen, Moser and three other women are chronicled in "She's the Ticket," an online documentary series premiering this week about women who decided to run for office after Trump's election.

Its executive producer Mary Robertson compares the women to so-called blizzard babies born nine months after a snowstorm.

"In some ways perhaps these women are an equivalent for politics, and that we're really looking at - the first wave of candidates and campaigns that were galvanized by Trump's election," Robertson told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

"It does seem as though there has been a historic response."

Women hold a quarter of state-level legislative seats in the United States, according to the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University in New Jersey.

They also make up one-fifth of the mayors of the large cities and of the U.S. Congress, it said.

Moser, who says she threw up as the election returns came in, is running for Congress in Houston, Texas.

Her previous claim to fame is arguably a photo that went viral of her 2-year-old daughter throwing a tantrum on the Oval Office floor in front of former President Barack Obama in 2015. Moser's husband was a member of Obama's White House staff.

SEE ALSO: Marijuana products don’t cure cancer, FDA warns

"Whatever happens, I'm very proud to be one of these women who is stepping up to answer the call of duty from an America in crisis," said Moser, a journalist and writer.

Stacey Abrams, who hopes to become the nation's first black female governor by winning the state of Georgia, also describes the election as a turning point.

"There was a pit in my stomach," said Abrams, an attorney who has served in the state legislature.

RELATED: How every state voted in the 2016 election

50 PHOTOS
How every state voted in the 2016 election
See Gallery
How every state voted in the 2016 election

Alabama

Donald Trump: 1,318,255 votes

Hillary Clinton: 729,547 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Alaska

Donald Trump: 163,387 votes

Hillary Clinton: 116,454 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Arkansas

Donald Trump: 684,872 votes

Hillary Clinton: 380,494 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Arizona

Donald Trump: 1,252,401 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,161,167 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Connecticut

Donald Trump: 673,315 votes

Hillary Clinton: 897,572 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

California

Donald Trump: 4,483,810 votes

Hillary Clinton: 8,753,788 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Alaska

Donald Trump: 163,387 votes

Hillary Clinton: 116,454 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Colorado

Donald Trump: 1,202,484 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,338,870 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Delaware

Donald Trump: 185,127 votes

Hillary Clinton: 235,603 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Florida

Donald Trump: 4,617,886 votes

Hillary Clinton: 4,504,975 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Georgia

Donald Trump: 2,089,104 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,877,963 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Hawaii

Donald Trump: 128,847 votes

Hillary Clinton: 266,891 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Iowa

Donald Trump: 800,983 votes

Hillary Clinton: 653,669 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Illinois

Donald Trump: 2,146,015 votes

Hillary Clinton: 3,090,729 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Idaho

Donald Trump: 409,055 votes

Hillary Clinton: 189,765 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Indiana

Donald Trump: 1,557,286 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,033,126 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Kansas

Donald Trump: 671,018 votes

Hillary Clinton: 427,005 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Kentucky

Donald Trump: 1,202,971 votes

Hillary Clinton: 628,854 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Louisiana

Donald Trump: 1,178,638 votes

Hillary Clinton: 780,154 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Maine

Donald Trump: 335,543 votes

Hillary Clinton: 357,735 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Massachusetts

Donald Trump: 1,090,893 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,995,196 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Michigan

Donald Trump: 2,279,543 votes

Hillary Clinton: 2,268,839 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Minnesota

Donald Trump: 1,323,232 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,367,825 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Mississippi

Donald Trump: 700,714 votes

Hillary Clinton: 485,131 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Missouri

Donald Trump: 1,594,511 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,071,068 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Montana

Donald Trump: 279,240 votes

Hillary Clinton: 177,709 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Nebraska

Donald Trump: 495,961 votes

Hillary Clinton: 284,494 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Nevada

Donald Trump: 512,058 votes

Hillary Clinton: 539,260 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

New Hampshire

Donald Trump: 345,790 votes

Hillary Clinton: 348,526 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

New Jersey

Donald Trump: 1,601,933 votes

Hillary Clinton: 2,148,278 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

New Mexico

Donald Trump: 319,667 votes

Hillary Clinton: 385,234 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

New York

Donald Trump: 2,819,534 votes

Hillary Clinton: 4,556,124 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

North Dakota

Donald Trump: 216,794 votes

Hillary Clinton: 93,758 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Ohio

Donald Trump: 2,841,005 votes

Hillary Clinton: 2,394,164 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Oklahoma

Donald Trump: 949,136 votes

Hillary Clinton: 420,375 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Oregon

Donald Trump: 782,403 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,002,106 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Pennsylvania

Donald Trump: 2,970,733 votes

Hillary Clinton: 2,926,441 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Rhode Island

Donald Trump: 180,543 votes

Hillary Clinton: 252,525 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

South Carolina

Donald Trump: 1,155,389 votes

Hillary Clinton: 855,373 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

South Dakota

Donald Trump: 227,721 votes

Hillary Clinton: 117,458 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Tennessee

Donald Trump: 1,522,925 votes

Hillary Clinton: 870,695 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Texas

Donald Trump: 4,685,047 votes

Hillary Clinton: 3,877,865 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Utah

Donald Trump: 515,231 votes

Hillary Clinton: 310,676 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Vermont

Donald Trump: 95,259 votes

Hillary Clinton: 178,573 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Virginia

Donald Trump: 1,769,443 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,981,473 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Washington

Donald Trump: 1,221,747 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,742,718 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

West Virginia

Donald Trump: 489,371 votes

Hillary Clinton: 188,794 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Wisconsin

Donald Trump: 1,405,284 votes

Hillary Clinton: 1,382,536 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

Wyoming

Donald Trump: 174,419 votes

Hillary Clinton: 55,973 votes

Data courtesy of the New York Times

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"I went into a deep depression for about 24 hours, and then I got back to work."

"She's the Ticket" debuts this week on Topic.com, a visual story-telling website. It is part of First Look Media, launched by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar.

The documentary also showcases Crystal Murillo, candidate for city council in Aurora, Colorado, and Jennifer Carroll Foy, running for the House of Delegates in the state of Virginia. (Reporting by Ellen Wulfhorst, editing by Katy Migiro. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, property rights, climate change and resilience. Visit http://news.trust.org)

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.