Family of girl abducted by North Korea hopes Trump can win her return

TOKYO — Megumi Yokota was walking home from badminton practice after school when she was kidnapped.

She was 13 and just a few hundred yards from her house in the Japanese coastal city of Niigata when North Korean agents spirited her away by boat to their secretive state across the water.

Her family hasn't seen her since.

That was Nov. 15, 1977. Despite the passing decades, the girl's plight has remained a cause célèbre in Japan.

The girl was one of more than a dozen Japanese nationals who were seized by North Korea in the 1970s and 1980s.

President Donald Trump is scheduled to meet relatives of these abductees next week as part of a 12-day trip to Asia that begins on Friday.

RELATED: A look at kidnapped Megumi Yokota and her family

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A look at kidnapped Megumi Yokota and her family
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A look at kidnapped Megumi Yokota and her family
Pyongyang, DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF: This undated picture taken in North Korea shows Kim Young-Nam and his daughter Kim Hye-Kyong, and whose mother is believed to be Megumi Yokota, a Japanese national who Pyongyang admitted kidnapping when she was a 13-year-old schoolgirl in 1977. Kim Young-Nam, kidnapped by North Korea when he was a schoolboy from a South Korean beach in 1978, was reunited with his 82-year-old mother Choi Gye-Wol 28 june 2006 for the first time since he disappeared nearly three decades ago. AFP PHOTO/POOL (Photo credit should read AFP/AFP/Getty Images)
TOKYO - OCTOBER 23: Fifteen-year-old North Korean Kim Hye Gyon is shown in this September 30, 2002 photograph. Japanese officials confirmed October 23, 2002 that DNA evidence shows that she is the daughter of Megumi Yokota, a Japanese national who was abducted to North Korea at 13-years-old. North Korean officials said that Yokota had suffered from depression and eventually killed herself at a mental facility many years ago. North Korean officials confirmed the abduction of 13 Japanese nationals in the 1970s and 80s to teach Japanese language. (Photo by Getty Images)
TOKYO - OCTOBER 3: Photographs of Japanese abductee, Megumi Yokota, at 13 (R) and at 20, taken in North Korea, is shown at a news conference October 3, 2002 in Tokyo, Japan. Yokota was the youngest national kidnapped, abducted on her way home from badminton practice. She and other nationals were abducted in the 1970s and 80s to teach Japanese language and customs in spy schools in North Korea. (Photo by Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images)
TOKYO - OCTOBER 3: Father of Japanese abductee, Megumi Yokota, holds a picture of his daughter at 13-years-old (L) and at 20-years-old, taken in North Korea, during a news conference October 3, 2002 in Tokyo, Japan. Yokota was the youngest national kidnapped, abducted on her way home from badminton practice. She and other nationals were abducted in the 1970s and 80s to teach Japanese language and customs in spy schools in North Korea. (Photo by Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images)
TOKYO - SEPTEMBER 17: Megumi Yokota's father cries during a news conference with other family members of missing Japanese nationals, abducted by North Korean agents in the 1970s and 80s, after they were officially informed of the deaths of their children from the historic meeting between Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi and North Korean leader Kim Jong-il September 17, 2002 in Tokyo, Japan. Thirteen-year-old Yokota was the youngest national kidnapped, abducted on her way home from badminton practice. She and other nationals were abducted to teach Japanese language and customs in spy schools in North Korea. (Photo by Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images)
NIIGATA, JAPAN: This photo dated April 1977 shows Japanese student Megumi Yokota, who was kidnaped by North Korean agents later the same year. Megumi was one of eight Japanese nationals 17 September 2002 Pyongyang confirmed were dead as North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il apologised for the kidnapping at an historic meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. Megumi's parents now hope to find out how and when their daughter died. AFP PHOTO/JIJI PRESS (Photo credit should read AFP/Getty Images)
Pyongyang, DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF: This picture taken on 21 July 1993 in North Korea shows Kim Hye-Kyong daughter of Kim Young-nam and whose mother is believed to be Megumi Yokota, a Japanese national who Pyongyang admitted kidnapping when she was a 13-year-old schoolgirl in 1977. Kim Young-Nam, kidnapped by North Korea when he was a schoolboy from a South Korean beach in 1978, was reunited with his 82-year-old mother Choi Gye-Wol 28 June 2006 for the first time since he disappeared nearly three decades ago. AFP PHOTO/KOREA POOL (Photo credit should read KOREA POOL/AFP/Getty Images)
Pyongyang, DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF: This picture taken on 20 July 1993 in North Korea shows Kim Young-Nam and his daughter Kim Hye-Kyong, and whose mother is believed to be Megumi Yokota, a Japanese national who Pyongyang admitted kidnapping when she was a 13-year-old schoolgirl in 1977. Kim Young-Nam, kidnapped by North Korea when he was a schoolboy from a South Korean beach in 1978, was reunited with his 82-year-old mother Choi Gye-Wolfor the first time since he disappeared nearly three decades ago. AFP PHOTO/POOL (Photo credit should read AFP/AFP/Getty Images)
NIIGATA, JAPAN - JUNE 9: Sakie Yokota, parents of Megumi Yokota who was abducted to North Korea decades ago, attends a rally against North Korea at the northern port of Niigata on June 9, 2003 in Niigata, Japan. A North Korean passenger ship, Mangyongbong-92, which was suspected to have carried missile parts to North Korea, did not come to a port in Niigata as planned. (Photo by Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images)
TOKYO, JAPAN: People visit a photo exhibition in Tokyo, 10 January 2006, showing Megumi Yokota before she was abducted by North Korea in November 1977. Kim Jong-Il has no chance to see it, but thousands have flocked to an exhibition here of happy family photos of a Japanese girl kidnapped by North Korea, fuelling anger against his regime. Megumi Yokota was snatched away in 1977 when the then 13-year-old schoolgirl was on her way home. She has since become a symbol of Japanese abduction victims, an issue hanging over relations between the two countries. AFP PHOTO / Kazuhiro NOGI (Photo credit should read KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/Getty Images)
Sakie Yokota (R), mother of Megumi Yokota who was abducted by North Korea agents at age 13 in 1977, answers questions from the media with her husband Shigeru during a news conference in Kawasaki, west of Tokyo, March 17, 2014. After a hiatus of more than a year, Japan and North Korea are set to resume high-level talks over Pyongyang's nuclear and missile programmes and the issue of Japanese citizens abducted decades ago, Japanese media said on Monday. The media reports come after Sakie and Shigeru Yokota met their Megumi's daughter for the first time. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
Shigeru Yokota (L) and his wife Sakie, parents of Megumi Yokota who was abducted by North Korea agents at age 13 in 1977, attend a news conference in Kawasaki, west of Tokyo, March 17, 2014. After a hiatus of more than a year, Japan and North Korea are set to resume high-level talks over Pyongyang's nuclear and missile programmes and the issue of Japanese citizens abducted decades ago, Japanese media said on Monday. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY)
U.S. President George W. Bush (L) meets family members of Japanese abducted by North Korea and North Korean Defectors in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, April 28, 2006. Included in the meeting are Sakie Yokota (C), mother of Japanese kidnap victim Megumi Yokota, and her son Takuya Yokota (R). REUTERS/Jason Reed
U.S. President George W. Bush (C) meets with family members of Japanese abducted by North Korea and North Korean defectors in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington April 28, 2006. Included in the meeting are Sakie Yokota (2nd R), mother of Japanese kidnap victim Megumi Yokota, her son Takuya Yokota (R), Kim Han-Mi (L of Bush), the daughter of North Korean defectors Kim Gwi-Ok (her mother, seated 3rd L) and Kim Gwang-Cheol (father, seated 2nd L). REUTERS/Jason Reed
Shigeru (R) and Sakie Yokota (2nd R), parents of Megumi Yokota who is one of the Japanese abductees kidnapped by North Korea in the 1970s, sit on a street with families and supporters of other abductees near Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's official residence in Tokyo June 24, 2005. Families of those who were abducted to North Korea and their supporters launched a three-day sit-in on Friday to urge the premier to impose economic sanctions on Pyongyang. REUTERS/Issei Kato IK/YH
Choi Gye-wol, mother of Kim Young-nam, a South Korean abducted by North Korea some 30 years ago, wipes her tears during a news conference in Seoul April 12, 2006. A man said by North Korea to have been the husband of the famous Japanese abductee Megumi Yokota was almost certainly Kim, a South Korean also kidnapped by Pyongyang, Japan's top spokesman, Shinzo Abe, said on Tuesday, citing DNA tests, local media reported. Abe said DNA tests showed there was a "high probability" that the husband of Yokota -- one of 13 Japanese whom Pyongyang has admitted kidnapping in the 1970s and 1980s to help train spies -- was one of five South Korean men abducted to the North. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
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Although they have no physical proof, Megumi's family believes she is alive and has campaigned for years for her return.

One of her brothers, Tetsuya Yokota, 49, told NBC News that he believes Trump's tough-talking stance on North Korea might lead to the breakthrough in the case his family has been waiting for.

"He seems willing to apply very strong pressure, and he always goes through with what he says," Yokota said of Trump. "If he listens to our appeal … even if it doesn’t lead to a direct rescue, I firmly believe it will definitely lead to that result indirectly."

North Korea has been one of the defining issues in Trump's foreign policy. He has traded the patient tone favored by President Barack Obama for something closer to the apocalyptic language used by North Korea's dictator, Kim Jong Un.

Many analysts have criticized Trump's approach, warning it increases the likelihood of a misunderstanding that could provoke a devastating war. But Megumi's brother disagrees.

"I think it's clear that Kim Jong Un is feeling pressure because of it," Yokota said of the president's fiery threats. "So I hope he does continue to make these remarks."

Yokota feels that this stance, as well as sanctions against Kim's government, is just the kind of hardline approach that might just bring about a resolution to his sister's case.

Trump mentioned the kidnapping of Megumi Yokota in his speech to the United Nations General Assembly last month, using it as an example of North Korea’s flagrant human rights abuses.

Japan's prime minister, Shinzo Abe, then invited Trump to meet the abductees' families.

"He accepted on the spot," Abe said this month. "He promised he would do his best to rescue the Japanese abduction victims."

Megumi's family feels that time may be running out. Her parents are both frail and in their 80s, but memories of their daughter haven't faded.

"She was always extremely upbeat," her brother said. "In our household her presence was like the sun, always laughing."

"But when she suddenly disappeared, the Yokota household all at once became very dark. Even today, I can’t forget her smile," he said.

Yokota also worries that his public criticism of North Korea has made him a target.

RELATED: Everything you didn't know about Kim Jong Un

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Everything you didn't know about Kim Jong Un
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Everything you didn't know about Kim Jong Un

1. While Kim Jong Un's birthday on January 8 is a national holiday, it is unknown exactly how old the North Korean leader is. It's widely believed he is in his early-mid thirties. In 2016, the U.S. Treasury Department listed his birth year as 1984 when they placed sanctions on North Korea.

 (KCNA via REUTERS)

2. Kim Jong Un is the world's youngest leader, according to the date listed by the Treasury. 

(STR/AFP/Getty Images)

3. Kim Jong Un is very passionate about basketball. He is reportedly a big fan of Michael Jordan and has a friendly relationship with Jordan's former Chicago Bulls teammate Dennis Rodman. Rodman has visited the secluded nation multiple times and even sang him "Happy Birthday" before an exhibition game in Jan. 2014. 

(REUTERS/KCNA)

4. Kim Jong Un reportedly has a love for smoking, whiskey and cheese

(KCNA/via Reuters)

5. Kim Jong Un's older half-brother Kim Jong Nam was killed in Feb. 2017 by two women who smeared VX nerve agent on his face at an airport in Kuala Lumpur. The women were arrested following his death. Many believe the hit was directed by North Korea. 

(KCNA; REUTERS)

6. Kim Jong Un has two college degrees. One is in physics from Kim il Sung University and another as an Army officer obtained from the Kim Il Sung Military University.

(KCNA/REUTERS)

7. Kim Jong Un attended boarding school in Switzerland. It is widely disputed how much time he spent at the school. Most reports say he was abroad from 1998-2000. 

(KCNA/REUTERS)

8. Kim Jong Un is the only general in the world that does not have any military experience. 

(KCNA/REUTERS)

9. He married Ri Sol Ju in 2009. The couple has at least one daughter named Ju Ae. 

(KCNA/REUTERS)

10. Kim Jong Un had his uncle Jang Song Thaek arrested and executed for treachery in 2013. 

(REUTERS/Kyodo)

11. Kim Jong Un hand selected North Korea's first all-female music group -- Moranbong Band. They made their debut in 2012. 

(ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)

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"If I’m standing on a platform waiting for a train, I not try to stand near the edge," he said. "A North Korean agent or one of their sympathizers might push me from behind, thinking I was an obstacle to them. I always think this."

North Korea claimed Megumi killed herself in 1994, but the cremated remains sent back to Japan did not match her DNA.

Megumi reportedly married and had a daughter while living under the totalitarian regime. Her husband has reiterated Pyongyang's line that she died, but the family believes the statement was made under duress.

For years, Megumi's disappearance was a mystery with no clues.

It was not until two decades later that reports of North Korean involvement even surfaced. In 2002, the regime in Pyongyang finally admitted that its agents were responsible and eventually returned five others who had been abducted.

It emerged that the abductees were being used to train North Korean spies in Japanese language and culture so they could construct more convincing cover stories.

One spy convicted of bombing a South Korean passenger jet in 1987, killing all 115 on board, said she had been trained by Yaeko Taguchi, another Japanese woman who was kidnapped in 1978.

Trump's visit won't be the first time a U.S. leader has spoken with the abductees' families. In 2006, President George W. Bush met Megumi's mother, an occasion he called "one of the most moving meetings since I've been the president here in the Oval Office." Obama also met the family in 2014.

But Yokota is hopeful that Trump's unique way of dealing with North Korea might finally provide the family with either answers or closure.

"It’s an opportunity that someone like President Trump, who has the world’s attention, is visiting Japan," he said. "We cannot let people forget about this issue."

RELATED: As tensions rise, North Korea stages mass rally

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As tensions rise, North Korea stages mass rally in Pyongyang
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As tensions rise, North Korea stages mass rally in Pyongyang
A view shows a Pyongyang city mass rally held at Kim Il Sung Square on August 9, 2017, to fully support the statement of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government in this photo released on August 10, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA.?
Servicepersons of the Ministry of People's Security met on August 10, 2017 to express full support for the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government statement, in this photo released on August 11, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT.
A general view shows a Pyongyang city mass rally held at Kim Il Sung Square on August 9, 2017, to fully support the statement of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government in this photo released on August 10, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA.??
Servicepersons of the Ministry of People's Security met on August 10, 2017 to express full support for the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government statement, in this photo released on August 11, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A general view shows a Pyongyang city mass rally held at Kim Il Sung Square on August 9, 2017, to fully support the statement of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government in this photo released on August 10, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA.??
A general view shows a Pyongyang city mass rally held at Kim Il Sung Square on August 9, 2017, to fully support the statement of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government in this photo released on August 10, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA.??
People participate in a Pyongyang city mass rally held at Kim Il Sung Square on August 9, 2017, to fully support the statement of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government in this photo released on August 10, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA.?
People participate in a Pyongyang city mass rally held at Kim Il Sung Square on August 9, 2017, to fully support the statement of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government in this photo released on August 10, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA.?
A general view shows a Pyongyang city mass rally held at Kim Il Sung Square on August 9, 2017, to fully support the statement of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government in this photo released on August 10, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA.
A view shows a Pyongyang city mass rally held at Kim Il Sung Square on August 9, 2017, to fully support the statement of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government in this photo released on August 10, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA.?
A view shows a Pyongyang city mass rally held at Kim Il Sung Square on August 9, 2017, to fully support the statement of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government in this photo released on August 10, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA.?
TOPSHOT - This picture taken on August 11, 2017 and released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on August 12, 2017 shows North Korean youths and workers and trade union members holding a rally to protest the UN Security Council's 'sanctions resolution' at the compound of the Monument to Party Founding in Pyongyang. Nearly a week ago, the UN Security Council unanimously passed fresh sanctions against Pyongyang over its weapons program, including export bans, a new punishment that could cost North Korea $1 billion a year. / AFP PHOTO / KCNA VIS KNS AND AFP PHOTO / STR / South Korea OUT / REPUBLIC OF KOREA OUT ---EDITORS NOTE--- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT 'AFP PHOTO/KCNA VIA KNS' - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS THIS PICTURE WAS MADE AVAILABLE BY A THIRD PARTY. AFP CAN NOT INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, LOCATION, DATE AND CONTENT OF THIS IMAGE. THIS PHOTO IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY AFP. / (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
This picture taken on August 11, 2017 and released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on August 12, 2017 shows North Korean youths and workers and trade union members holding a rally to protest the UN Security Council's 'sanctions resolution' at the Youth Park Open-Air theatre in Pyongyang. Nearly a week ago, the UN Security Council unanimously passed fresh sanctions against Pyongyang over its weapons program, including export bans, a new punishment that could cost North Korea $1 billion a year. / AFP PHOTO / KCNA VIS KNS AND AFP PHOTO / STR / South Korea OUT / REPUBLIC OF KOREA OUT ---EDITORS NOTE--- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT 'AFP PHOTO/KCNA VIA KNS' - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS THIS PICTURE WAS MADE AVAILABLE BY A THIRD PARTY. AFP CAN NOT INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, LOCATION, DATE AND CONTENT OF THIS IMAGE. THIS PHOTO IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY AFP. / (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
A view shows a Pyongyang city mass rally held at Kim Il Sung Square on August 9, 2017, to fully support the statement of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government in this photo released on August 10, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA.?
This picture taken on August 10, 2017 and released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on August 11, 2017 shows service personnel of the Ministry of People's Security at a rally in support of North Korea's stance against the US, in Pyongyang. / AFP PHOTO / KCNA VIA KNS / STR / South Korea OUT / REPUBLIC OF KOREA OUT ---EDITORS NOTE--- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT 'AFP PHOTO/KCNA VIA KNS' - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS THIS PICTURE WAS MADE AVAILABLE BY A THIRD PARTY. AFP CAN NOT INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, LOCATION, DATE AND CONTENT OF THIS IMAGE. THIS PHOTO IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY AFP. / (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
A view shows a Pyongyang city mass rally held at Kim Il Sung Square on August 9, 2017, to fully support the statement of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government in this photo released on August 10, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA.?
This picture taken on August 10, 2017 and released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on August 11, 2017 shows service personnel of the Ministry of People's Security at a rally in support of North Korea's stance against the US, in Pyongyang. / AFP PHOTO / KCNA VIA KNS / STR / South Korea OUT / REPUBLIC OF KOREA OUT ---EDITORS NOTE--- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT 'AFP PHOTO/KCNA VIA KNS' - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS THIS PICTURE WAS MADE AVAILABLE BY A THIRD PARTY. AFP CAN NOT INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, LOCATION, DATE AND CONTENT OF THIS IMAGE. THIS PHOTO IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY AFP. / (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
A general view shows a Pyongyang city mass rally held at Kim Il Sung Square on August 9, 2017, to fully support the statement of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) government in this photo released on August 10, 2017 by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang. KCNA/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA.??
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