Judge worries Paul Manafort is a flight risk, admonishes his lawyer

WASHINGTON ― The federal judge who will oversee the prosecution of President Donald Trump’s former campaign manager said Thursday that she has “concerns” that Paul Manafort poses a flight risk, questioning whether an unsecured bond was enough to make sure he’d show up in court.

U.S. District Court Judge Amy Berman Jackson also admonished Manafort’s attorney Kevin Downing for his statement to the media outside the courthouse following Manafort’s first court appearance on Monday morning.

“This is a criminal trial,” Jackson said. “It’s not a public relations campaign.” Lawyers, she said, should make their arguments in court “not on the courthouse steps.”

RELATED: Lavish ways the FBI says Paul Manafort spent his millions

14 PHOTOS
Lavish ways the FBI says Paul Manafort spent his millions
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Lavish ways the FBI says Paul Manafort spent his millions
Paul Manafort was indicted for a range of charges, including $18 million in money laundering and tax fraud.

*Click through the slides to see the lavish ways the FBI says he spent his millions.*

(BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI via Getty Images)
$20,000: Housekeeping in New York

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$31,900: Purchases from an art gallery in Florida

(Jupiterimages via Getty Images)

$46,000: Property management company in South Carolina

(amedved via Getty Images)

$273,455: Payments related to four Range Rovers and a Mercedes-Benz

(edaldridge via Getty Images)

$558,137: Contractors in Florida and Virginia

(vm via Getty Images)

$500,000: Investment company

(Annasmithphoto via Getty Images)

$520,440: Clothing store in Beverly Hills, California


(emyu via Getty Images)
$820,240: Landscaper in the Hamptons, New York

(Pgiam via Getty Images)
$849,215: Men's clothing store in New York

(fotosylvie via Getty Images)
$1,432,106: Home automation and home entertainment companies in Florida and New York

(archideaphoto via Getty Images)
$1,658,260: Antiques in New York and Virginia

(BarrySheene via Getty Images)

$5,434,793: Home improvement company in the Hamptons

(fstop123 via Getty Images)

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The appearances of Manafort and his associate Richard Gates in court on Thursday focused on the conditions of their release. Both had initially been released on multimillion-dollar unsecured bonds, meaning they would only have to pay up if they skip out. Jackson indicated on Thursday that something more may be required, saying she was “very concerned” that an unsecured bond in and of itself was not sufficient. She indicated she was open to lifting the conditions of house arrest, but seemed skeptical of removing the electronic monitoring. 

“I have concerns about flight,” Jackson said.

Jackson did say she would allow Gates to leave his home on Saturday and Sunday to attend his childrens’ sports games, but she left the house arrest conditions in place until Monday’s hearing. 

Manafort and Gates pleaded not guilty this past Monday. Both were charged by special counsel Robert Mueller, who is investigating Russian interference with the 2016 election. 

RELATED: Trump's former campaign manager Paul Manafort through the years

13 PHOTOS
Trump's former campaign manager Paul Manafort through the years
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Trump's former campaign manager Paul Manafort through the years
U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's campaign chair and convention manager Paul Manafort speaks at a press conference at the Republican Convention in Cleveland, U.S., July 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump gives a thumbs up as his campaign manager Paul Manafort (C) and daughter Ivanka (R) look on during Trump's walk through at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, U.S., July 21, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's campaign chair and convention manager Paul Manafort appears at a press conference at the Republican Convention in Cleveland, U.S., July 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump's campaign manager Paul Manafort talks to the media from the Trump family box on the floor of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Paul Manafort, senior advisor to Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump, smiles as he talks with other Trump campaign staff after Trump spoke to supporters following the results of the Indiana state primary, at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York, U.S., May 3, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump's senior campaign adviser Paul Manafort (L) walks into a reception with former Republican presidential candidate Dr. Ben Carson, at the Republican National Committee Spring Meeting at the Diplomat Resort in Hollywood, Florida, April 21, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 21: Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort listens to Ivanka Trump speak at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland on July 21, 2016. (Photo by Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JULY 20: A man with a security credential takes a selfie at the podium as Donald Trump, flanked by campaign manager Paul Manafort and daughter Ivanka, checks the podium early Thursday afternoon in preparation for accepting the GOP nomination to be President at the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio on Wednesday July 20, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JULY 19: Paul Manafort, advisor to Donald Trump, is seen on the floor of the Quicken Loans Arena at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, July 19, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Paul Manafort., Convention Manager, Trump Campaign, appears on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Sunday April 10, 2016. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
NA.R.DoleMicCk1.081596.RG.Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole looks up from podium at balloons and television cameras as convention center manager Paul Manafort, at right, points out preparations for tonight's acceptance speech in San Diego, 08/15/96. (Photo by Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 21: Paul Manafort, Roger Stone and Lee Atwater, young Republicans political operatives who have set up lobbying firms. (Photo by Harry Naltchayan/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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Ryan Reilly is HuffPost’s senior justice reporter, covering criminal justice, federal law enforcement and legal affairs. Have a tip? Reach him at ryan.reilly@huffingtonpost.com or on Signal at 202-527-9261.

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.

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