Osama bin Laden had ‘Cars,’ ‘Chicken Little’ in video library

Osama bin Laden had the “Charlie bit my finger” video among his terrorist files at the Pakistan compound where he was killed during a 2011 Navy SEAL raid.

The one-minute 2007 video — along with another version in Arabic — was listed in the 470,000 of files seized from the former al Qaeda leader’s Abbottabad compound and released by the CIA on Wednesday.

Bin Laden’s video library ranged from family films such as “Cars” and “Chicken Little,” the animated action film “Batman: Gotham Knight” and the self-reflective “Where in the World is Osama bin Laden.”

The CIA said it couldn’t release those selections along with roughly another 20 either because of they were either copyrighted, pornographic in nature or corrupted.

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U.S. President Barack Obama stands after addressing the nation on TV from the East Room of the White House to make a televised statement May 1, 2011 in Washington, DC. Bin Laden has been killed near Islamabad, Pakistan almost a decade after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 and his body is in possession of the United States. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski-Pool/Getty Images)
In this handout image provided by The White House, President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and members of the national security team receive an update on the mission against Osama bin Laden in the Situation Room of the White House May 1, 2011 in Washington, DC. Obama later announced that the United States had killed Bin Laden in an operation led by U.S. Special Forces at a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. (Photo by Pete Souza/The White House via Getty Images)
A newspaper vendor displays papers heralding the death of Osama Bin Laden on May 2, 2011 in New York City. President Barack Obama announced the death of Osama bin Laden during a late night address to the nation from the White House in Washington on May 1. The mastermind of the September 11 terrorist attacks was killed in an American military operation at a compound in Pakistan. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
US Marines of Regiment Combat Team 1 (RCT 1) watch TV as President Barack Obama announces the death of Osama Bin Laden, at Camp Dwyer in Helman Province, on May 2, 2011. US President Barack Obama said on May 1, 2011 that justice had been done after the September 11, 2001 attacks with the death of Osama bin Laden, but warned that Al-Qaeda will still try to attack the US. (Photo by Bay Ismoyo via AFP/Getty Images)
People celebrate in Times Square after the death of accused 9-11 mastermind Osama bin Laden was announced by U.S. President Barack Obama May 2, 2011 in New York City. Bin Laden was killed in an operation by U.S. Navy Seals in a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Newspapers left by visitors grace the fence overlooking the crash site of Flight 93 following the announcement that Osama Bin Laden had been killed in Pakistan May 2, 2011 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Nearly 10 years after September 11, 2001 construction is underway to erect a formal memorial at the crash site. Last night U.S. President Barack Obama announced that the United States had killed the most-wanted terrorist Osama Bin Laden in an operation led by U.S. Special Forces in a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
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Bin Laden’s personal journal was also released along with 18,000 other documents, 79,000 audio bits and image clips as well as 10,000 video files, the CIA said.

The videos featured “home movies” made by the terror cell along with the “Charlie bit my finger,” which was first spotted by a reported from the Libertarian magazine Reason.

The 10-year-old viral video shows a British boy with his baby brother, Charlie, sitting on his lap. When the boy puts his finger near Charlie’s mouth, the teething tot decides to chomp down — bringing his big brother to tears.

A version of British comedy “Mr. Bean” translated into Pashto was also found listed in the trove.

Navy SEALs recovered the files from bin Laden’s northwest Pakistan compound during the historic May 2, 2011, raid.

Some of the ones released Wednesday — the fourth CIA document dump since 2015 — included practice speeches and a video of his son, Hamza Bin Laden.

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UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1754: Osama bin Laden born March 10, 1957. member of the prominent Saudi bin Laden family and the founder of the Islamic extremist organization al-Qaeda, best known for the September 11 attacks on the United States and numerous other mass-casualty attacks against civilian and military targets. (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
AFGHANISTAN - MAY 26: (JAPAN OUT)(VIDEO CAPTURE) This image taken from a collection of videotapes obtained by CNN shows Saudi terrorist suspect Osama bin Laden at a press conference May 26, 1998 in Afghanistan. The tape showing this image was included in a large collection of videotapes obtained by CNN from a secret location in Afghanistan. Although it can not be positively verified that the tapes were created by the al Qaeda terrorist network the tapes do show dramatic and sometimes repulsive images of poison gas experiments on dogs, instructions on making TNT and weapons training by men speaking Arabic. (Photo by CNN via Getty Images)
AFGHANISTAN - MAY 26: (JAPAN OUT)(VIDEO CAPTURE) This image taken from a collection of videotapes obtained by CNN shows Saudi terrorist suspect Osama bin Laden and his unidentified body guards watching a rocket propelled grenade fly overhead on May 26, 1998 in Afghanistan. The tape showing this image was included in a large collection of videotapes obtained by CNN from a secret location in Afghanistan. Although it can not be positively verified that the tapes were created by the al Qaeda terrorist network the tapes do show dramatic and sometimes repulsive images of poison gas experiments on dogs, instructions on making TNT and weapons training by men speaking Arabic. (Photo by CNN via Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - JUNE: A screengrab released on 1998 showing Osama Bin Laden, renegade fundamentalist Saudi millionaire said to be initiator of the bombings of US embassies in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. (Photo by WTN PICS/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, UNITED STATES: US President George W. Bush (C) answers questions from the media as US National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice (L) and US Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld (R) look on during a meeting with military leaders at the Pentagon 17 September, 2001. The President said that the United States wants Saudi-born suspected terror mastermind Osama bin Laden brought to justice 'dead or alive'. AFP PHOTO/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 16: Daily life In Quetta, Pakistan On September 16, 2001 - Pakistanis Police in the streets of Quetta, a city located 200kms from Bin Laden's secret HQ, in Afghanistan. (Photo by Pool AVENTURIER/GLADIEU/STEVENS/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 16: Daily life In Quetta, Pakistan On September 16, 2001 - Afghans of Quetta reading Bin Laden-related news in local newspaper. (Photo by Pool AVENTURIER/GLADIEU/STEVENS/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 17: Osama Bin Laden posters sold in bookshops In Quetta, Pakistan On September 17, 2001. (Photo by Pool AVENTURIER/GLADIEU/STEVENS/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
PAKISTAN - SEPTEMBER 17: Osama Bin Laden posters sold in bookshops In Quetta, Pakistan On September 17, 2001. (Photo by Pool AVENTURIER/GLADIEU/STEVENS/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
394642 01: People hold 'No War' signs at a peace rally September 19, 2001 in Islamabad, Pakistan. Sporadic protests were small but police stopped all rallies in the capitol city saying they were against the law. In other areas of Pakistan protesters burned American flags and supported Osama bin Laden as they demonstrated against an expected U.S. attack on Afghanistan. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
394704 03: (SYDSVENSKA DAGBLADET OUT) Youths supporting Osama Bin Laden and the Taliban movement look at a newspaper cover of Bin Laden September 20, 2001 outside Jamia Islamia mosque in central Rawalpindi, Pakistan about 15 kilometers outside Islamabad. Most of the youths attend Sipah-e Sahaba, a religious school in the area known for educating future Taliban members. (Photo by Per-Anders Pettersson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 11: President George W. Bush speaks to reporters during his first prime-time news conference since taking office in the East Room of the White House. Bush said that he doesn't know whether Osama Bin Laden is dead or alive, but offered to halt the war in Afghanistan if the Taliban turns over 'the evil one' and fellow 'parasites that hide in their country.' (Photo by Harry Hamburg/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: New York Yankee fans hold up an anti-Osama bin Laden sign during the American League Division Series game one between the Oakland Athletics and the Yankees 10 October, 2001, at Yankee Stadium in New York. The Athletics won the game 5-3. AFP PHOTO/Timothy CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
395648 09: Sikhs attend a community service to remember victims of terrorist attacks, October 10, 2001 in Santa Ana, CA. Although Sikhs are not Muslims and come from India, they have been targeted in recent hate crimes because the men wear turbans and beards similar to terrorist suspect Osama bin Laden. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
395589 11: (FILE PHOTO) Osama bin Laden sits in front of a map in this undated still frame from a recruitment video for his extremist Al-Qaida network. (Photo by Al Rai Al Aam/Feature Story News/Getty Images)
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CIA officials say the files also give a glimpse at bin Laden’s bid to keep factions of al Qaeda together, as well as reshape the terror group’s tainted reputation among Muslims.

The agency last opened documents in January 2017, following releases in 2015 and 2016.

Mike Pompeo, head of the agency, on Wednesday said releasing the files “provides the opportunity for the American people to gain further insights into the plans and workings of this terrorist organization.”

In September, Pompeo said the agency won’t release the once most-wanted terrorist’s pornography collection.

CIA officials previously turned down a 2015 Freedom of Information Act request by BroBible to access the lewd material.

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