Republicans want tax reform, and they want it now

For Republicans, passing tax reform is now a top priority. Party leadership wants a bill to get through Congress before Thanksgiving and on President Donald Trump's desk by Christmas.

That's not a lot of time. To make it more of a challenge, the GOP is once again trying to pass its bill along party lines.

The House approved the Senate's nonbinding budget resolution Thursday, allowing the upper chamber to pass tax reform with 51 votes rather than 60.

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But even passing the budget, a first step toward tax reform, was a close call.

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President Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
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President Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
US President Donald Trump speaks on tax reform, at Harrisburg International Airport on October 11, 2017 in Middletown, Pennsylvania. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin waits for U.S. President Donald Trump to speak about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Donald Trump is obscured by a teleprompter as he speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Director of the National Economic Council Gary Cohn speaks on a mobile phone as U.S. President Donald Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
People listen as U.S. President Donald Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
US President Donald Trump steps out of a limousine to board off Air Force One before departing from Harrisburg International Airport on October 11, 2017 in Middletown, Pennsylvania. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks on tax reform inside a hangar at the Harrisburg International Airport on October 11, 2017 in Middletown, Pennsylvania. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks on tax reform, at Harrisburg International Airport on October 11, 2017 in Middletown, Pennsylvania. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
US President Donald Trump speaks on tax reform, at Harrisburg International Airport on October 11, 2017 in Middletown, Pennsylvania. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
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Twenty House Republicans voted against it, more than half due to concern the eventual tax bill would eliminate a deduction for state and local taxes, commonly called SALT.

Getting rid of those SALT deductions would save the government between $1.3 trillion and $1.8 trillion over the next 10 years, but people in certain states would have to pay more each year.

The budget blueprint lets Congress add to the deficit, allowing for $1.5 trillion in tax cuts over a decade. The House Ways and Means Committee plans to introduce a tax reform bill Nov. 1.

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