Gorka compares Hillary Clinton to pair of convicted spies who 'got the chair' 

Former White House adviser Sebastian Gorka has blasted Hillary Clinton for her alleged role in a Russian uranium deal when she was secretary of state, even going so far as to compare her to a couple who were executed for spying in the 50s. 

The comment was made on Fox News Thursday after host Sean Hannity said, “The Russians infiltrated our national security to corner the uranium market and they succeeded, and they knew all the crimes that were committed.” 

Gorka chimed in, saying, “If this had happened in the 1950s, there would be people up on treason charges right now.”

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Julius and Ethel Rosenberg
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Julius and Ethel Rosenberg
Condemned spy Julius Rosenberg sits manacled in a United States Marshal's van en route to the Federal House of Detention, New York. His wife Ethel sits behind him. Despite pleas for clemency the pair were executed. (Photo by � Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 2000: Ethel Greenglass Rosenberg in U.S. marshal's car after being convicted of stealing atomic secrets for Russia.The judge called the crime 'worse than murder.' (Photo by Eddie Jackson/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 19: Juilius and Ethel Rosenberg childen, Michael Rosenberg, 10 reads about his parents as brother Robert, 6, just stares at pages in home of friends in Toms River, New Jersey. (Photo by Leonard Detrick/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 17: Juilius and Ethel Rosenberg, son Michael Meeropol with bull horn at Federal Court building protesting. (Photo by Dan Jacino/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 20: Juilius and Ethel Rosenberg childen, Robert Rosenberg with grandmother Sophie Rosenberg and his brother Michael after grandmother won custody temporarily. (Photo by Fred Morgan/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
A soldier smiles from the backseat of a convertible as he proudly displays a newspaper announcing the impending executions of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg for espionage, Washington DC, June 19, 1953. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - NOVEMBER 05: A manacled Julius Rosenberg and his wife Ethel embrace outside of the U.S. Court House in Foley Square after being found guilty of espionage. (Photo by Ed Jackson/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
GERMANY - APRIL 21: April 21, 1976. During a visit to East Germany, Robert MEEROPOL (third to the right with the mustache), the son of Julius and Ethel ROSENBERG gives a press conference about the work being done by American liberals to bring about a revision of the trial which had led his parents to the electric chair in 1953. With him is Morton SOBELL (fifth to the right) who received a prison sentence during the ROSENBERG trial, and Marshal PERLIN (7th to the right), the ROSENBERG children's lawyer. The ROSENBERGS had been accused of giving secrets about atomic arms to the Soviet Union. The accusation was based on testimony by Ethel ROSENBERG'S brother, David GREENGLASS, who admitted having given stolen documents from the Los Alamos Atomic Center to his brother-in-law Julius. (Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 20: Front page of the Daily News dated June 20, 1953, Headline: SPIES DIE IN CHAIR, Execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg (Photo by NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 20: Crowd at a rally for Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. (Photo by Hal Mathewson/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 19: Julius and Ethel Rosenberg supporters on a train at Penn Station. (Photo by Joe Petrella/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 19: Juilius and Ethel Rosenberg childen, Robert Rosenberg, age 6 and his brother Michael Rosenberg, age 10, toy with piano in friends New Jersey home. (Photo by Leonard Detrick/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
A letter from Michael and Robert Rosenberg pleading for the life of their parents, spies Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, is viewed during a press preview at the National Archives on March 18, 2014 in Washington, DC. The National Archives previewed their new exhibit 'Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures' which features documents with signatures from Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, John Hancock, Michael Jackson and others. AFP PHOTO/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: Sophie Rosenberg, mother of Julius Rosenberg, a civilian engineer with the US Army Signal Corps, is surrounded in February 1954 in New York by her grandsons Michael (R) and Robert, eight months after the execution of they parents for espionage. Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, husband and wife, joined in 1939 the US Communist Party, and were in 1950 convicted of being part of a transatlantic spy ring uncovered after the trial of Klaus Fuchs in Britain. They were found guilty in a highly controversial trial of passing on atomic secrets to the Soviet Union and became the first US civilians to be executed for espionage in Sing Sing Prison 19 June 1953. Their sons were later adopted by the Meeropol family. (Photo credit should read AFP/AFP/Getty Images)
Arrest of Ethel Rosenberg, August 11, 1950, by the F.B.I, related by the New York 'Daily News', United States, 1950. (Photo by: Photo12/UIG via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 2001: Mrs. Ethel Rosenberg, convicted spy sentenced to death, mounts steps to Sing Sing Prison administration building between Deputy Marshals Sarah Goldstein and Anthony Pavone. She and her attorney denounced removal to death house as 'unnecessary and vindictive.' (Photo by Ossie Leviness/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
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“The Rosenbergs, okay? This is equivalent to what the Rosenbergs did and those people got the chair,” he added. “Think about it. Giving away nuclear capability to our enemies, that’s what we’re talking about.” 

Gorka was referring to Julius and Ethel Rosenberg who were put to death in the electric chair in 1953 for spying after her brother, a Manhattan Project employee, implicated them in a Soviet plot to gain classified information about the atomic bomb. 

Meanwhile, the uranium deal, signed in 2010 under the Obama administration, has been attracting renewed attention, with Republican representatives announcing the launch of an investigation into it, reports CNN.

The probe may have been prompted, at least in part, by a report from The Hill last week which stated “the FBI had gathered substantial evidence that Russian nuclear industry officials were engaged in bribery, kickbacks, extortion and money laundering designed to grow Vladimir Putin’s atomic energy business inside the United States, according to government documents and interviews.”

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Sebastian Gorka
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Sebastian Gorka

Sebastian Gorka, member of the national security advisory staff of the United States, was present for he Medal of Honor ceremony for former Specialist Five James C. McCloughan, U.S. Army in the East Room of the White House, on Monday, July 31, 2017.

(Photo by Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

White House Deputy Assistant To The President Sebastian Gorka speaks as he is interviewed by Fox News remotely from the White House June 22, 2017 in Washington, DC. Gorka discussed American Otto Warmbier's death after his return from North Korean detention.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Sebastian Gorka, Deputy Assistant to President Donald Trump, is interviewd outsside of the West Wing Portico (North Lawn) of the White House, on Friday, June 9, 2017.

(Photo by Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Deputy assistant to President Trump Sebastian Gorka participates in a discussion during the Conservative Political Action Conference at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center February 24, 2017 in National Harbor, Maryland. Hosted by the American Conservative Union, CPAC is an annual gathering of right wing politicians, commentators and their supporters.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Sean Hannity, Sebastian Gorka during the Conservative Political Action Conference at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center February 23, 2017 in National Harbor, Maryland. Hosted by the American Conservative Union, CPAC is an annual gathering of right wing politicians, commentators and their supporters.

(Photo by Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

White House Deputy Assistant To The President Sebastian Gorka speaks as he is interviewed by Fox News remotely from the White House June 22, 2017 in Washington, DC. Gorka discussed American Otto Warmbier's death after his return from North Korean detention.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Sean Hannity, Sebastian Gorka during the Conservative Political Action Conference at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center February 23, 2017 in National Harbor, Maryland. Hosted by the American Conservative Union, CPAC is an annual gathering of right wing politicians, commentators and their supporters.

(Photo by Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Former deputy assistant to the U.S. president, Sebastian Gorka, delivers remarks during the Value Voters Summit at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, U.S., October 14, 2017. REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert
Former deputy assistant to the U.S. president, Sebastian Gorka, delivers remarks during the Value Voters Summit at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, U.S., October 14, 2017. REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert
Former deputy assistant to the U.S. president, Sebastian Gorka, delivers remarks during the Value Voters Summit at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, U.S., October 14, 2017. REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert
Ex-Trump adviser Sebastian Gorka (L) and former vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin stand with Alabama Supreme Court Justice Tom Parker (R) as they campaign for U.S. Senate candidate Judge Roy Moore at the Historic Union Station Train Shed in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S., September 21, 2017. REUTERS/Tami Chappell
Ex-Trump adviser Sebastian Gorka (L) campaigns for U.S. Senate candidate Judge Roy Moore, with his wife Kayla Moore (R), at the Historic Union Station Train Shed in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S. September 21, 2017. REUTERS/Tami Chappell
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The piece goes on to say that, despite an ongoing Justice Department investigation, the Obama administration decided to move forward with “the partial sale of Canadian mining company Uranium One to the Russian nuclear giant Rosatom, giving Moscow control of more than 20 percent of America’s uranium supply.” 

Hillary Clinton has also been drawn into the controversy, with the New York Times reporting in 2015 that some of the people who had helped build Uranium One had contributed more than $2 million to the Clinton Foundation. 

The alleged transfer of money occurred during a time when Mrs. Clinton was head of the U.S. State Department, one of several agencies that had to weigh in on the sale.

Despite allegations of potential wrongdoing by Trump during the campaign, a PolitiFact investigation concluded, “While the connections between the Clinton Foundation and the Russian deal may appear fishy, there was simply no proof of any quid pro quo.” 

Furthermore, media outlets have pointed out that the sale required the approval of eight other agencies, and Clinton herself has called the allegations against her “baloney.”  

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