Poll: Fewer than a third of Americans back Trump tax plan

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Fewer than a third of Americans support Donald Trump's tax-cut plan, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll released on Tuesday, as the U.S. president went to Capitol Hill looking for Republican backing for his proposal to slash tax rates for individuals and companies.

As the 2018 midterm congressional election campaigns grow nearer, the poll found that more than two-thirds of registered voters said reducing the U.S. federal budget deficit is more important than cutting taxes for the wealthy or for corporations.

Trump's plan would balloon the deficit and add to the $20 trillion national debt, according to critics and independent analysts, but Republicans say the tax cuts proposed in the plan would be offset by economic growth that would generate new tax revenue.

RELATED: Trump talks tax reform in Pennsylvania

13 PHOTOS
President Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
See Gallery
President Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
US President Donald Trump speaks on tax reform, at Harrisburg International Airport on October 11, 2017 in Middletown, Pennsylvania. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin waits for U.S. President Donald Trump to speak about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Donald Trump is obscured by a teleprompter as he speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Director of the National Economic Council Gary Cohn speaks on a mobile phone as U.S. President Donald Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
People listen as U.S. President Donald Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
US President Donald Trump steps out of a limousine to board off Air Force One before departing from Harrisburg International Airport on October 11, 2017 in Middletown, Pennsylvania. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks on tax reform inside a hangar at the Harrisburg International Airport on October 11, 2017 in Middletown, Pennsylvania. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks on tax reform, at Harrisburg International Airport on October 11, 2017 in Middletown, Pennsylvania. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks about tax reform in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
US President Donald Trump speaks on tax reform, at Harrisburg International Airport on October 11, 2017 in Middletown, Pennsylvania. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Among Republicans surveyed, 63 percent said deficit reduction should take priority over tax cuts for corporations, while 75 percent said deficit reduction should take priority over tax cuts for the wealthy.

Democrats oppose Trump's plan, unveiled on Sept. 27, and say it is unfair to the poor and the working class.

The plan is still only a nine-page "framework." It was drafted in secret by Trump administration and congressional leaders. Formal legislation is in development.

Congressional leaders and Trump are trying to lock in support for the plan from rank-and-file Republicans, who were uninvolved in the framework drafting process.

Trump, who has yet to score a major legislative win since taking office in January, wants his plan to become law before year's end, a timeframe that some policy analysts doubt is realistic.

SEE ALSO: Trump and Corker continue Twitter feud: '#AlertTheDaycareStaff'

More than half of the adults surveyed in the poll agreed that "cutting taxes for the poor is more important than reducing the federal deficit," with 68 percent of Democrats and 47 percent of Republicans in accord with that statement, the poll showed.

The Oct. 20-23 poll found that only 15 percent of registered voters said Republicans in Congress should prioritize tax reform over other issues. About a quarter of those polled, including 23 percent of Democrats and 30 percent of Republicans, agreed that Congress should continue working on a healthcare bill.

Of those adults who said they had heard of the "tax reform plan recently proposed by congressional Republicans," just 28 percent said they support it, while 41 percent said they oppose it and another 31 percent said they do not know.

The poll found opinions on Trump's plan were sharply divided along party lines, with 56 percent of Republicans and just 9 percent of Democrats supporting it.

Of those who had heard of the plan, 14 percent said it would cut their taxes, while 30 percent said it would increase their taxes. Another 35 percent said their taxes would not change and 20 percent said they did not know how it would impact them.

SEE ALSO: Trump the 'dangerous clown': Halloween comes early at the New Yorker

The Reuters/Ipsos poll was conducted online in English in all 50 states. It gathered responses from 1,862 people, including 1,079 people who said they were aware of the Republican tax plan. It has a credibility interval, a measure of accuracy, of 3 percentage points.

(Reporting by Amanda Becker and Chris Kahn; Editing by Kevin Drawbaugh and Bill Rigby)

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.