Sgt. LaDavid Johnson's widow demands answers on husband's death, confirms Trump forgot his name during call

The widow of slain Army Sgt. LaDavid Johnson on Monday demanded answers about her husband’s death in Africa, as she refuted President Trump’s claims about his controversial condolence call to her.

“I don’t know how he got killed, where he got killed or anything,” Myeshia Johnson told ABC News’ “Good Morning America” in her first interview since the sergeant’s death. “They never told me and that’s what I’ve been trying to find out since.”

LaDavid Johnson was one of four Army soldiers killed in the attack outside Tongo Tongo, Niger, on Oct. 4. His body wasn’t discovered for roughly 48 hours, which has irked his widow among others.

RELATED: A look at the soldiers killed in Niger ambush 

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A combination photo of U.S. Army Special Forces Sergeant Jeremiah Johnson (L to R), U.S. Special Forces Sgt. Bryan Black, U.S. Special Forces Sgt. Dustin Wright and U.S. Special Forces Sgt. La David Johnson killed in Niger, West Africa on October 4, 2017, in these handout photos released October 18, 2017. Courtesy U.S. Army Special Operations Command/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY
A U.S. Army carry team transfers the remains of Army Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright of Lyons, Georgia, at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware, U.S. on October 5, 2017. Courtesy Aaron J. Jenne/U.S. Air Force/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.
U.S. Army Sergeant La David Johnson, who was among four special forces soldiers killed in Niger, West Africa on October 4, 2017, poses in a handout photo released October 18, 2017. Courtesy U.S. Army Special Operations Command/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.

Staff Sergeant Dustin Wright, 29, of Lyons, Georgia

(Photo via U.S. Army)

Staff Sergeant Jeremiah Johnson, 39, of Springboro, Ohio

(Photo via U.S. Army)

Staff Sergeant Bryan Black, 35, of Puyallup, Washington

(Photo via U.S. Army)
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Johnson said she wasn’t even allowed to see her husband’s body before his funeral Saturday.

“I don’t know what’s in that box,” she said. “It could be empty for all I know. I haven’t seen him since he came home.”

Her condolence call with the President has been the eye of a White House firestorm over the last week.

Rep. Frederica Wilson (D-Fla.) claimed she heard part of the call on speakerphone, during which Trump told the pregnant Johnson her husband “knew what he signed up for.”

Trump has vehemently denied that, slamming Wilson’s account as “fabricated” and calling the lawmaker “whacky.”

But Johnson confirmed Wilson’s series of events, which happened as she was en route to receive her husband’s body at Dover Air Base.

“Whatever Ms. Wilson said was not fabricated,” Johnson told “GMA” on Monday. “What she said was 100% correct.”

She said Trump called the cellphone of a master sergeant in the car. Johnson asked him to put the call on speaker so her aunt and uncle, also in the car, could hear the call.

Johnson said she cried for several reasons, especially because Trump seemingly forgot the sergeant’s name. The only reason he remembered it was because of a report in front of him, she said.

“I heard him stumbling on trying to remember my husband’s name,” Johnson told “GMA.” “And that’s what made me upset and cry even more because my husband was an awesome soldier.”

RELATED: US forces lead training missions in Niger

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US special forces lead training mission for African militaries in Niger
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US special forces lead training mission for African militaries in Niger
A U.S. special forces soldier demonstrates how to detain a suspect during Flintlock 2014, a U.S.-led international training mission for African militaries, in Diffa, March 4, 2014. On a dusty training ground in Niger, U.S. Special Forces teach local troops to deal with suspects who resist arrest. The drill in the border town of Diffa is part of Operation Flintlock, a counter-terrorism exercise for nations on the Sahara's southern flanks that the United States organises each year. Washington's aim is to tackle Islamist militants in the Sahel region while keeping its military presence in Africa light. A growing number of European nations taking part shows their increasing concern about security in West Africa. Central to the international effort is a blossoming relationship between the United States and France, the former colonial power and traditional "policeman" of the turbulent region. Picture taken March 4, 2014. To match Analysis AFRICA-USA/SECURITY REUTERS/Joe Penney (NIGER - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS)
Nigerian soldiers walk in a line during Flintlock 2014, a U.S.-led international training mission for African militaries, in Diffa, March 3, 2014. On a dusty training ground in Niger, U.S. Special Forces teach local troops to deal with suspects who resist arrest. The drill in the border town of Diffa is part of Operation Flintlock, a counter-terrorism exercise for nations on the Sahara's southern flanks that the United States organises each year. Washington's aim is to tackle Islamist militants in the Sahel region while keeping its military presence in Africa light. A growing number of European nations taking part shows their increasing concern about security in West Africa. Central to the international effort is a blossoming relationship between the United States and France, the former colonial power and traditional "policeman" of the turbulent region. Picture taken March 3, 2014. To match Analysis AFRICA-USA/SECURITY REUTERS/Joe Penney (NIGER - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS)
Chadian soldiers place pieces of cloth on the ground during Flintlock 2014, a U.S.-led international training mission for African militaries, in Diffa, March 3, 2014. On a dusty training ground in Niger, U.S. Special Forces teach local troops to deal with suspects who resist arrest. The drill in the border town of Diffa is part of Operation Flintlock, a counter-terrorism exercise for nations on the Sahara's southern flanks that the United States organises each year. Washington's aim is to tackle Islamist militants in the Sahel region while keeping its military presence in Africa light. A growing number of European nations taking part shows their increasing concern about security in West Africa. Central to the international effort is a blossoming relationship between the United States and France, the former colonial power and traditional "policeman" of the turbulent region. Picture taken March 3, 2014. To match Analysis AFRICA-USA/SECURITY REUTERS/Joe Penney (NIGER - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS)
Chadian soldiers run during a mock ambush during Flintlock 2014, a U.S.-led international training mission for African militaries, in Diffa, March 6, 2014. On a dusty training ground in Niger, U.S. Special Forces teach local troops to deal with suspects who resist arrest. The drill in the border town of Diffa is part of Operation Flintlock, a counter-terrorism exercise for nations on the Sahara's southern flanks that the United States organises each year. Washington's aim is to tackle Islamist militants in the Sahel region while keeping its military presence in Africa light. A growing number of European nations taking part shows their increasing concern about security in West Africa. Central to the international effort is a blossoming relationship between the United States and France, the former colonial power and traditional "policeman" of the turbulent region. Picture taken March 6, 2014. To match Analysis AFRICA-USA/SECURITY REUTERS/Joe Penney (NIGER - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS)
Nigerien soldiers do push-ups during Flintlock 2014, a U.S.-led international training mission for African militaries, in Diffa, March 5, 2014. On a dusty training ground in Niger, U.S. Special Forces teach local troops to deal with suspects who resist arrest. The drill in the border town of Diffa is part of Operation Flintlock, a counter-terrorism exercise for nations on the Sahara's southern flanks that the United States organises each year. Washington's aim is to tackle Islamist militants in the Sahel region while keeping its military presence in Africa light. A growing number of European nations taking part shows their increasing concern about security in West Africa. Central to the international effort is a blossoming relationship between the United States and France, the former colonial power and traditional "policeman" of the turbulent region. Picture taken March 5, 2014. To match Analysis AFRICA-USA/SECURITY REUTERS/Joe Penney (NIGER - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS)
Nigerian soldiers receive military theory training from British soldiers (not pictured) during Flintlock 2014, a U.S.-led international training mission for African militaries, in Diffa, March 3, 2014. On a dusty training ground in Niger, U.S. Special Forces teach local troops to deal with suspects who resist arrest. The drill in the border town of Diffa is part of Operation Flintlock, a counter-terrorism exercise for nations on the Sahara's southern flanks that the United States organises each year. Washington's aim is to tackle Islamist militants in the Sahel region while keeping its military presence in Africa light. A growing number of European nations taking part shows their increasing concern about security in West Africa. Central to the international effort is a blossoming relationship between the United States and France, the former colonial power and traditional "policeman" of the turbulent region. Picture taken March 3, 2014. To match Analysis AFRICA-USA/SECURITY REUTERS/Joe Penney (NIGER - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS)
Nigerian soldiers sleep after a training session during Flintlock 2014, a U.S.-led international training mission for African militaries, in Diffa, March 4, 2014. On a dusty training ground in Niger, U.S. Special Forces teach local troops to deal with suspects who resist arrest. The drill in the border town of Diffa is part of Operation Flintlock, a counter-terrorism exercise for nations on the Sahara's southern flanks that the United States organises each year. Washington's aim is to tackle Islamist militants in the Sahel region while keeping its military presence in Africa light. A growing number of European nations taking part shows their increasing concern about security in West Africa. Central to the international effort is a blossoming relationship between the United States and France, the former colonial power and traditional "policeman" of the turbulent region. Picture taken March 4, 2014. To match Analysis AFRICA-USA/SECURITY REUTERS/Joe Penney (NIGER - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS)
Chadian soldiers march during Flintlock 2014, a U.S.-led international training mission for African militaries, in Diffa, March 3, 2014. On a dusty training ground in Niger, U.S. Special Forces teach local troops to deal with suspects who resist arrest. The drill in the border town of Diffa is part of Operation Flintlock, a counter-terrorism exercise for nations on the Sahara's southern flanks that the United States organises each year. Washington's aim is to tackle Islamist militants in the Sahel region while keeping its military presence in Africa light. A growing number of European nations taking part shows their increasing concern about security in West Africa. Central to the international effort is a blossoming relationship between the United States and France, the former colonial power and traditional "policeman" of the turbulent region. Picture taken March 3, 2014. To match Analysis AFRICA-USA/SECURITY REUTERS/Joe Penney (NIGER - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A poster for Flintlock 2014, a U.S.-led international training mission for African militaries, is seen on the door of a Nigerien military office in Diffa, March 4, 2014. On a dusty training ground in Niger, U.S. Special Forces teach local troops to deal with suspects who resist arrest. The drill in the border town of Diffa is part of Operation Flintlock, a counter-terrorism exercise for nations on the Sahara's southern flanks that the United States organises each year. Washington's aim is to tackle Islamist militants in the Sahel region while keeping its military presence in Africa light. A growing number of European nations taking part shows their increasing concern about security in West Africa. Central to the international effort is a blossoming relationship between the United States and France, the former colonial power and traditional "policeman" of the turbulent region. Picture taken March 4, 2014. To match Analysis AFRICA-USA/SECURITY REUTERS/Joe Penney (NIGER - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS)
Chadian soldiers take a break during Flintlock 2014, a U.S.-led international training mission for African militaries, in Diffa, March 4, 2014. On a dusty training ground in Niger, U.S. Special Forces teach local troops to deal with suspects who resist arrest. The drill in the border town of Diffa is part of Operation Flintlock, a counter-terrorism exercise for nations on the Sahara's southern flanks that the United States organises each year. Washington's aim is to tackle Islamist militants in the Sahel region while keeping its military presence in Africa light. A growing number of European nations taking part shows their increasing concern about security in West Africa. Central to the international effort is a blossoming relationship between the United States and France, the former colonial power and traditional "policeman" of the turbulent region. Picture taken March 4, 2014. To match Analysis AFRICA-USA/SECURITY REUTERS/Joe Penney (NIGER - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
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