Ohio State University sued for refusing Richard Spencer event


Ohio State University is facing a lawsuit after the school said it wouldn't provide space on campus for white nationalist Richard Spencer to speak.

The suit was filed in federal court Sunday after the university refused to let Cameron Padgett rent space for an event with Spencer.

Padgett is a Georgia State University graduate student who has helped Spencer organize his college campus speaking engagements.

See photos of protests outside Richard Spencer's UF event

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Protests for and against Richard Spencer's UF appearance
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Protests for and against Richard Spencer's UF appearance
A man walks with a bloody lip as demonstrators yell at him outside the location where Richard Spencer, an avowed white nationalist and spokesperson for the so-called alt-right movement, is delivering a speech on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, U.S., October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Demonstrators rally before the speech by Richard Spencer, an avowed white nationalist and spokesperson for the so-called alt-right movement, on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, U.S., October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Demonstrators stand before the speech by Richard Spencer, an avowed white nationalist and spokesperson for the so-called alt-right movement, on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, U.S., October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Demonstrators rally before the speech by Richard Spencer, an avowed white nationalist and spokesperson for the so-called alt-right movement, on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, U.S., October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Tyler Tenbrink, a self proclaimed White Nationalist who drove from Texas, poses for a portrait before the speech by Richard Spencer, an avowed white nationalist and spokesperson for the so-called alt-right movement, on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, U.S., October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Tyler Tenbrink, a self proclaimed White Nationalist who drove from Texas, is stopped by the police before the speech by Richard Spencer, an avowed white nationalist and spokesperson for the so-called alt-right movement, on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, U.S., October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Demonstrators rally before the speech by Richard Spencer, an avowed white nationalist and spokesperson for the so-called alt-right movement, on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, U.S., October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Demonstrators rally before the speech by Richard Spencer, an avowed white nationalist and spokesperson for the so-called alt-right movement, on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, U.S., October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
A flier is seen on a pole the day before a speech by Richard Spencer, an avowed white nationalist and spokesperson for the so-called alt-right movement, on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, U.S., October 18, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Demonstrators rally before the speech by Richard Spencer, an avowed white nationalist and spokesperson for the so-called alt-right movement, on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, U.S., October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
A student walks past a banner and slogan the day before a speech by Richard Spencer, an avowed white nationalist and spokesperson for the so-called alt-right movement, on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, U.S., October 18, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: White nationalist Richard Spencer, who popularized the term 'alt-right' speaks during a press conference at the Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. Spencer delivered a speech on the college campus, his first since he and others participated in the 'Unite the Right' rally, which turned violent in Charlottesville, Virginia. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: White nationalist Richard Spencer, who popularized the term 'alt-right' speaks during a press conference at the Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. Spencer delivered a speech on the college campus, his first since he and others participated in the 'Unite the Right' rally, which turned violent in Charlottesville, Virginia. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: White nationalist Richard Spencer, who popularized the term 'alt-right' speaks during a press conference at the Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. Spencer delivered a speech on the college campus, his first since he and others participated in the 'Unite the Right' rally, which turned violent in Charlottesville, Virginia. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: White nationalist Richard Spencer, who popularized the term 'alt-right' speaks during a press conference at the Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. Spencer delivered a speech on the college campus, his first since he and others participated in the 'Unite the Right' rally, which turned violent in Charlottesville, Virginia. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: Police monitor the scene at the site of a planned speech by white nationalist Richard Spencer, who popularized the term 'alt-right', at the University of Florida campus on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. A state of emergency was declared on Monday by Florida Gov. Rick Scott to allow for increased law enforcement due to fears of violence. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: Police check the bags of journalists entering the site of a planned speech by white nationalist Richard Spencer, who popularized the term 'alt-right', at the University of Florida campus on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. A state of emergency was declared on Monday by Florida Gov. Rick Scott to allow for increased law enforcement due to fears of violence. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: Police monitor the scene at the site of a planned speech by white nationalist Richard Spencer, who popularized the term 'alt-right', at the University of Florida campus on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. A state of emergency was declared on Monday by Florida Gov. Rick Scott to allow for increased law enforcement due to fears of violence. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: Members of Richard Spencer's security team, in white, stand behind police and decide who gets tickets to a speech by white nationalist Richard Spencer, who popularized the term 'alt-right', at the University of Florida campus on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. A state of emergency was declared on Monday by Florida Gov. Rick Scott to allow for increased law enforcement due to fears of violence. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: A self-proclaimed white nationalist speaks to members of the media near the site of a planned speech by white nationalist Richard Spencer, who popularized the term 'alt-right', at the University of Florida campus on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. A state of emergency was declared on Monday by Florida Gov. Rick Scott to allow for increased law enforcement due to fears of violence. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: A woman cries and is comforted by a demonstrator after she was refused entry into a planned speech by Richard Spencer, a white nationalist who popularized the term 'alt-right', at the University of Florida campus on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. A state of emergency was declared on Monday by Florida Gov. Rick Scott to allow for increased law enforcement due to fears of violence. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: A woman protests as she is guided out by members of the Florida Highway Patrol after she was refused entry into a planned speech by Richard Spencer by members of Spencer's security team, not pictured, prior to a speech by Spencer, a white nationalist who popularized the term 'alt-right', at the University of Florida campus on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. A state of emergency was declared on Monday by Florida Gov. Rick Scott to allow for increased law enforcement due to fears of violence. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: Demonstrators gather at the site of a planned speech by white nationalist Richard Spencer, who popularized the term 'alt-right', at the University of Florida campus on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. A state of emergency was declared on Monday by Florida Gov. Rick Scott to allow for increased law enforcement due to fears of violence. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: A man protests as he is carried away by members of the Florida Highway Patrol from the entrance to a planned speech by white nationalist Richard Spencer, who popularized the term 'alt-right', after being refused tickets by members of Spencer's security team, not pictured, at the University of Florida campus on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. A state of emergency was declared on Monday by Florida Gov. Rick Scott to allow for increased law enforcement due to fears of violence. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: Demonstrators gather at the site of a planned speech by white nationalist Richard Spencer, who popularized the term 'alt-right', at the University of Florida campus on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. A state of emergency was declared on Monday by Florida Gov. Rick Scott to allow for increased law enforcement due to fears of violence. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
GAINESVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 19: Demonstrators gather at the site of a planned speech by white nationalist Richard Spencer, who popularized the term 'alt-right', at the University of Florida campus on October 19, 2017 in Gainesville, Florida. A state of emergency was declared on Monday by Florida Gov. Rick Scott to allow for increased law enforcement due to fears of violence. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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A lawyer representing Ohio State said in a letter Friday the university couldn't accommodate Padgett's request to rent space "due to substantial risk to public safety, as well as material and substantial disruption."

SEE MORE: Charlottesville Man Reflects On White Nationalist Rally In His Town

Ohio State's attorney said the school made the decision after talking with law enforcement and considering what happened during Spencer's speech at the University of Florida last week.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency ahead of the event. Spencer's appearance sparked numerous protests on campus. Three men were arrested and charged with attempted homicide in connection to a shooting that happened after Spencer's speech.

But it's possible Ohio State might have to honor Padgett's request after all. Attorney Kyle Bristow successfully sued Auburn University to let Spencer speak on its campus. And he's also filed lawsuits against Michigan State University and Penn State University.

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