Hundreds of mysterious ancient stone structures spotted in Saudi Arabia

Google Earth is a handy tool for all sorts of endeavors, and it appears finding ancient structures is among them.

Using the feature, University of Western Australia archaeologist David Kennedy and his colleagues discovered roughly 400 stone gates built on the edge of Saudi Arabian lava domes near Medina, reports LiveScience.

It’s estimated the walls could be as many as 7,000 years old. 

The Daily Mail notes that in a paper to be published in November’s Arabian Archaeology and Epigraphy, Kennedy describes the gates as, “stone-built…roughly made and low,” and appearing, “‘to be the oldest man-made structures in the landscape.” 

RELATED: Ancient Aztec temple unearthed in Mexico City

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Ancient Aztec temple unearthed in Mexico City
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Ancient Aztec temple unearthed in Mexico City

A new Aztec discovery of the remains of the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, is seen during a tour of the area, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017.

(REUTERS/Henry Romero)

A new Aztec discovery of the remains of the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, is seen during a tour of the area, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017.

(REUTERS/Henry Romero)

Raul Barrera, an archaeologist from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) speaks to the media about new Aztec discoveries including the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, as well as an adjacent ritual ball court, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Henry Romero)

Raul Barrera, an archaeologist from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) speaks to the media about new Aztec discoveries including the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, as well as an adjacent ritual ball court, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Henry Romero)

Raul Barrera, an archaeologist from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) shows to the media a new Aztec discovery a ritual ball court, during a tour of the area, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Henry Romero)

A new Aztec discovery of the remains of the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, is seen during a tour of the area, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017.

(REUTERS/Henry Romero)

A new Aztec discovery of the remains of the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, is seen during a tour of the area, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero

A new Aztec discovery of the remains of the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, is seen during a tour of the area, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Henry Romero)

A model of the major structures of the ceremonial precinct of the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan, including the temple to the wind god and ball court, as seen outside the ruins of the Templo Mayor in downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Henry Romero)

A new Aztec discovery of the remains of the main temple of the wind god Ehecatl, a major deity, is seen during a tour of the area, located just off the Zocalo plaza in the heart of downtown Mexico City, Mexico June 7, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Henry Romero)

View of the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City on June 7, 2017.

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexican archaeologist Raul Barerra gives an explanation during a tour by the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City, on June 7, 2017. 

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexican archaeologist Raul Barerra gives an explanation during a tour by the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City, on June 7, 2017. 

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

View of the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City on June 7, 2017.

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexican archaeologist Raul Barerra (R) gives an explanation during a tour by the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City, on June 7, 2017.

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

View of the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City on June 7, 2017. 

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexican archaeologist Raul Barerra (R) gives an explanation during a tour by the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City, on June 7, 2017. 

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexican archaeologist Eduardo Matos Moctezuma gives an explanation during a press conference on the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City, on June 7, 2017.

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

View of the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City on June 7, 2017. 

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

Mexican archaeologist Eduardo Matos Moctezuma gives an explanation during a press conference on the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City, on June 7, 2017. 

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

Journalists work during a tour by the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City, on June 7, 2017. 

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

View of the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City on June 7, 2017. 

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

View of the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City on June 7, 2017.

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

View of the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City on June 7, 2017. 

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

View of the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City on June 7, 2017. 

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

View of the archaeological site of the ancient Aztec temple of Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl and ritual Ball Game recently discovered in downtown Mexico City on June 7, 2017. 

(ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images)

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Arrangements vary, with a number standing alone and others grouped into rectangular formations. 

Kennedy notes the structures, “are found almost exclusively in bleak, inhospitable lava fields with scant water or vegetation, places seemingly amongst the most unwelcoming to our species.” 

What purpose they served remains unknown.

According to Kennedy, learning more about the gates will require fieldwork. 

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