The Milwaukee Marathon got the distance wrong again, and it could have big implications for some runners

For the second year in a row, the course distance for the PNC Milwaukee Marathon wasn't properly measured, according to Lori Nickel of The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel.

In 2016, the course was reportedly too long, forcing some runners to go half-a-mile longer than necessary, with a few dozen runners going even further.

This year, the course was about eight-tenths of a mile, or approximately 4,200 feet, too short.

According to Nickel, the race changed ownership, but the course, which changed from last year, was measured by the same organizers, who once again got it wrong.

The race director said there was an error on the route certification map, causing the turn around to be marked in the wrong spot, and thus, making the course too short.

Joe Zimmerman, the president of the marathon, said in a statement, "We deeply regret that this human error by experienced professionals happened and are notifying all concerned."

According to Nickel, it could have real implications for runners trying to qualify for other marathons like the Boston Marathon. USA Track and Field said the course failed to meet their standards, which means runners may not be able to use their times to qualify for the Boston Marathon.

See scenes from this year's Boston Marathon:

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Boston Marathon 2017
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The elite women's runners leave the starting line for the 121st running of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, U.S. April 17, 2017. REUTERS/Lisa Hornak
Apr 17, 2017; Hopkinton, MA, USA; The elite men at the start line of the 2017 Boston Marathon. Mandatory Credit: Paul Rutherford-USA TODAY Sports
Apr 17, 2017; Boston, MA, USA; General view of the pack of elite women near the start of the 2017 Boston Marathon. Mandatory Credit: Greg M. Cooper-USA TODAY Sports
Apr 17, 2017; Boston, MA, USA; A general view as the elite men lead the field in the 2017 Boston Marathon. Mandatory Credit: Greg M. Cooper-USA TODAY Sports
The women's wheelchair competitors leave the starting line for the 121st running of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, U.S. April 17, 2017. REUTERS/Lisa Hornak
Apr 17, 2017; Boston, MA, USA; Marcel Hug and Manuela Schar both from Switzerland celebrate winning the wheelchair divisions 2017 Boston Marathon. Mandatory Credit: Winslow Townson-USA TODAY Sports
ASHLAND, MA - APRIL 17: A field of elite women's runners make their way along the course during the running of the 121st Boston Marathon in Ashland, MA, April 17, 2017. (Photo by Keith Bedford/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON - APRIL 17: Edna Kiplagat of Kenya looks back as she pulls away from the pack during the running of the 121st Boston Marathon in Boston, MA, April 17, 2017. (Photo by Keith Bedford/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 17: Edna Kiplagat of Kenya runs the course after pulling away from the pack during the running of the 121st Boston Marathon in Boston, MA, April 17, 2017. (Photo by Keith Bedford/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
HOPKINTON, MA - APRIL 17: A runner jumps for joy at the start of the Boston Marathon from Hopkinton, Mass. on April. 17, 2017. (Photo by Bill Greene/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
HOPKINTON, MA - APRIL 17: Wave 1 runners leave the starting line of the 121st Boston Marathon from Hopkinton, Mass., on April. 17, 2017. (Photo by Bill Greene/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
NEWTON, MA - APRIL 17: Kenyan Geoffrey Kirui leads the pack up Heartbreak Hill on Commonwealth Avenue in Newton, MA during the 121st running of the Boston Marathon on Apr. 17, 2017. (Photo by Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Apr 17, 2017; Boston, MA, USA; Geoffrey Kirui (KEN) and Galen Rupp (USA) race during the 2017 Boston Marathon. Kirui won with a time of 2:09:37. Mandatory Credit: Greg M. Cooper-USA TODAY Sports
Apr 17, 2017; Boston, MA, USA; Geoffrey Kirui runs down Boylston Street towards the finish line of the 2017 Boston Marathon. Kirui won the men's division. Mandatory Credit: Brian Fluharty-USA TODAY Sports
Geoffrey Kirui of Kenya crosses the finish line to win the men?s division of the 121st Boston Marathon in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., April 17, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Apr 17, 2017; Boston, MA, USA; Geoffrey Kirui crosses the finish line of the 2017 Boston Marathon winning the men's division. Mandatory Credit: Brian Fluharty-USA TODAY Sports
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According to Nickel, last year, race organizers adjusted the times for runners who went over the 26.2 miles, but the Boston Marathon would only accept the standard qualifying times, even if runners had gone over 26.2 miles. Nickel estimates that times won't be accepted this year either, even if they are adjusted upward.

Some runners said they were alarmed when their fitness trackers said they were short of the standard marathon distance.

Chris Ponteri, the creator of the race, told Nickel: "Runners are pretty forgiving when it happens once. They don’t forget, but they forgive. When it happens a second time ... I'm not sure there will be the same forgiveness."

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