Poll: 42 percent say Trump’s legacy as president will be one of the worst in US history

With less than one year in office, President Trump’s legacy already appears to be in doubt.

In fact, according to a new Marist Poll, 42 percent of nearly 1,100 U.S. adults surveyed say he will be remembered as “one of the worst presidents in the nation’s history.” 

Meanwhile, an additional 16 percent have indicated that they view him as a “below average leader.” 

President Trump and Vice President Pence:

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Donald Trump and Mike Pence
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence (L) and U.S. President Donald Trump appear on stage at a rally in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. April 29, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. President Donald Trump talks with Vice President Mike Pence as he departs the White House to North Dakota, in Washington, U.S., September 6, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump waves after attending a briefing with Vice President Mike Pence (L) and first lady Melania Trump (R) on Hurricane Irma relief efforts in Fort Myers, Florida, U.S., September 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump stands with first lady Melania Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen (R) during a moment of silence in the wake of the the mass shooting in Las Vegas at the White House in Washington, U.S., October 2, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence escorts U.S. President Donald Trump back towards the table after Trump left before signing an executive order on healthcare at the White House in Washington, U.S., October 12, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump and U.S. Vice President Mike Pence stand on the ramp of Air Force One as Trump arrives in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 22, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump is joined by (L-R) Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, Vice President Mike Pence, senior advisor Steve Bannon, Communications Director Sean Spicer and National Security Advisor Michael Flynn as he speaks by phone with Russia's President Vladimir Putin in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 28, 2017. With the departure of Bannon from the White House on August 18, 2017 none of these men remain working with Trump at the White House except Vice President Pence. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo
Vice President Mike Pence laughs as U.S. President Donald Trump holds a baseball bat as they attend a Made in America product showcase event at the White House in Washington, U.S., July 17, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity chaired by Vice President Mike Pence (R) at the White House in Washington, U.S., July 19, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters with Vice President Mike Pence at his side at Trump's golf estate in Bedminster, New Jersey U.S. August 10, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence attend a National Day of Prayer event at the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington D.C., U.S., May 4, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
President Donald Trump, Vice-President Mike Pence and Attorney General Jeff Sessions attend the National Peace Officers Memorial Service on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., May 15, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump reacts as he is introduced by Vice President Mike Pence (L) during the signing of an executive order on "Energy Independence," eliminating Obama-era climate change regulations at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) headquarters in Washington, U.S., March 28, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Trump addresses Joint Session of Congress - Washington, U.S. - 28/02/17 - U.S. President Donald Trump speaks in front of Vice President Mike Pence (L) and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
U.S. President Donald Trump (C), Vice President Mike Pence (R) and White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus arrive to meet Harley Davidson executives at the South Lawn of the White House in Washington U.S., February 2, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump sings the U.S. National Anthem while accompanied by his wife Melania, Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen (R) during a prayer service at Washington National Cathedral the morning after his inauguration, in Washington, U.S., January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump with his wife Melania and Vice President Mike Pence with his wife Karen cut a cake at the Armed Services Ball in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence salute marchers during the inaugural parade in Washington, January 20, 2017. Donald Trump was sworn in earlier as the 45th President of the United States. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Mike Pence(L), Donald Trump (2nd L), U.S. President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden attend inauguration ceremonies swearing in Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States on the West front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
First Lady Melania Trump, President Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and Karen Pence wave goodbye to Barack and Michelle Obama on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. In today's inauguration ceremony Donald J. Trump becomes the 45th president of the United States. REUTERS/Rob Carr/Pool
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump (R) shakes hands with Indiana Governor Mike Pence (L) before addressing the crowd during a campaign stop at the Grand Park Events Center in Westfield, Indiana, July 12, 2016. REUTERS/John Sommers II
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump shakes hands with his running mate Governor Mike Pence (R) at the conclusion of the final session of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 21, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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“Deep into his first year as president, Donald Trump’s less than stellar approval rating has lowered expectations about how history will judge him. For history to treat him kinder, he will have to up his game,” Dr. Lee Miringoff with The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion said in a news release about the results.

However, the results are largely split along party lines, with 88 percent of Democrats expressing a likely negative historical view of his term while 48 percent of Republicans have predicted an above-average legacy or better.

The partisan divide is also reflected in participants’ current impressions of Trump. The poll found that 88 percent of Democrats have an unfavorable view, while 83 percent of Republicans have a favorable one. 

RELATED: 10 most common words used to describe Trump

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10 most common words used to describe Trump
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10 most common words used to describe Trump

"Incompetent"

 "Arrogant"

"Strong"

"Idiot"

"Egotistical"

 "Ignorant"

"Great"

"Racist"

"A**hole"

"Narcissistic"

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And, despite the recent controversies the administration has faced, the president’s overall favorable versus unfavorable rating has largely remained in the mid-30s and upper-50s, respectively, for the past few months.

The figures appear to be consistent with other polls. As of October 19, the statistical website FiveThirtyEight had Trump's approval rating as 38 percent and his disapproval at 55.8 percent. 

Based on the amount of time he has spent in office thus far, Trump’s net approval number is tracking below that of every U.S. president in modern history going back to Harry Truman. 

But, according to the Texas Tribune, its own recent survey with the University of Texas found that Trump is in good standing among state Republicans, with poll co-director Jim Henson saying, “His base is still very secure.” 

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