The recently freed Taliban captive initially didn't believe Donald Trump was president

A Canadian man who was recently freed after five years in Taliban captivity initially didn't believe Donald Trump was elected US president.

Joshua Boyle, who returned home to Canada on Friday evening after a five year ordeal, was told by one of the captors that Trump had been elected president late last year prior to filming a "proof-of-life" video.

"It didn’t enter my mind that he was being serious," Boyle told The Toronto Star, in a wide-ranging interview from Boyle's parents house outside of Toronto.

Boyle, and his wife, Caitlan Coleman, were kidnapped by the Taliban-allied Haqqani network after traveling to Kabul, Afghanistan in 2012.

The couple was held in a series of tiny, underground cells along the Afghanistan-Pakistan with little access to television, radio, or any reading materials.

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Caitlan Coleman and Joshua Boyle, held by Taliban affiliate
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Caitlan Coleman and Joshua Boyle, held by Taliban affiliate

Caitlan Coleman, Joshua Boyle and their children.

(Screenshot from Taliban Video)

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 23: Caitlan Coleman, the wife of Canadian Joshua Boyle, holds her infant daughter as she speaks to the Star from the grounds of a hospital in Ottawa, in her first interview since the family's rescue from Taliban- linked militants in Pakistan. (Michelle Shephard/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
Freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle and one of his children walk outside the Boyle's family home in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on October 14, 2017. Boyle, whose family was freed from captivity in Pakistan last week, arrived back home early October 14. He accused his kidnappers of murdering his baby daughter and raping his wife during his family's years-long captivity by the Haqqani network, a Taliban-affiliated group operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Boyle leveled the accusations in a terse statement he read on arrival in Toronto late October 13 with his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, and three children, who were freed on October 11 by Pakistani troops. / AFP PHOTO / Mike CARROCCETTO (Photo credit should read MIKE CARROCCETTO/AFP/Getty Images)

Joshua Boyle speaks to the media after arriving with his wife and three children to Toronto Pearson International Airport, nearly 5 years after he and his wife were abducted in Afghanistan in 2012 by the Taliban-allied Haqqani network, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, October 13, 2017.

(REUTERS/Mark Blinch)

Linda Boyle, mother of freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle, arrives with grocery bags at the Boyle family home in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on October 14, 2017. Freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle, who arrived back home early October 14 morning, accused his kidnappers of murdering his baby daughter and raping his wife during his family's years-long captivity by the Haqqani network, a Taliban-affiliated group operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Boyle leveled the accusations in a terse statement he read on arrival in Toronto late October 13 with his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, and three children, who were freed on October 11 by Pakistani troops. / AFP PHOTO / Mike Carroccetto (Photo credit should read MIKE CARROCCETTO/AFP/Getty Images)
Freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle watches as one of his children plays outside the Boyle's family home in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on October 14, 2017. Boyle, whose family was freed from captivity in Pakistan last week, arrived back home early October 14. He accused his kidnappers of murdering his baby daughter and raping his wife during his family's years-long captivity by the Haqqani network, a Taliban-affiliated group operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Boyle leveled the accusations in a terse statement he read on arrival in Toronto late October 13 with his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, and three children, who were freed on October 11 by Pakistani troops. / AFP PHOTO / Mike CARROCCETTO (Photo credit should read MIKE CARROCCETTO/AFP/Getty Images)
Joshua Boyle speaks to the media after arriving with his wife and three children at Toronto Pearson International Airport, nearly 5 years after he and his wife were abducted in Afghanistan in 2012 by the Taliban-allied Haqqani network, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, October 13, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Blinch
Security guards outside freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle's family home in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on October 14, 2017. Freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle, who arrived back home early October 14 morning, accused his kidnappers of murdering his baby daughter and raping his wife during his family's years-long captivity by the Haqqani network, a Taliban-affiliated group operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Boyle leveled the accusations in a terse statement he read on arrival in Toronto late October 13 with his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, and three children, who were freed on October 11 by Pakistani troops. / AFP PHOTO / Mike Carroccetto (Photo credit should read MIKE CARROCCETTO/AFP/Getty Images)
SMITHS FALLS, ON - OCT. 12: Boyle-room: The room in the Boyle's Smith Falls, Ont. home that has been set up for the return of Joshua Boyle's three children, born in captivity during their five years held hostage. (Michelle Shephard/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
Linda Boyle, mother of freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle, arrives at the Boyle family home in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on October 14, 2017. Freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle, who arrived back home early October 14 morning, accused his kidnappers of murdering his baby daughter and raping his wife during his family's years-long captivity by the Haqqani network, a Taliban-affiliated group operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Boyle leveled the accusations in a terse statement he read on arrival in Toronto late October 13 with his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, and three children, who were freed on October 11 by Pakistani troops. / AFP PHOTO / Mike Carroccetto (Photo credit should read MIKE CARROCCETTO/AFP/Getty Images)
SMITHS FALLS, ON - OCT. 12: Patrick Boyle, his wife Linda and security consultant Andy Ellis talk to Canadian and U.S. officials about the release of Joshua Boyle, his wife Caitlan Coleman and their three children. The couple had been held hostage for five years by the Haqqani network. Their three children were born in captivity. (Michelle Shephard/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
SMITHS FALLS, ON - OCT. 12: Joshua Boyle's sister sits with their family dog, with a crib in the foreground that family is getting ready for her 2-month-old niece. (Michelle Shephard/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 12 - Linda and Patrick Boyle in their Smith Falls, ON. home awaiting the arrival of their son, daughter-in-law and three grandchildren who were rescued by the Pakistani army on Oct. 11. Joshua Boyle, 34, Caitlan Coleman, 31 were held hostage by the Haqqani network for five years. All three of their children, two sons 4 an 2 and a 2-month-old daughter were born in captivity. (Randy Risling/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
Joshua Boyle walks through the airport after arriving with his wife and three children at Toronto Pearson International Airport, nearly 5 years after he and his wife were abducted in Afghanistan in 2012 by the Taliban-allied Haqqani network, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, October 13, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Blinch
Patrick Boyle, father of freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle walks outside his home in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on October 14, 2017. Joshua Boyle, whose family was freed from captivity in Pakistan last week, arrived back home early October 14. He accused his kidnappers of murdering his baby daughter and raping his wife during his family's years-long captivity by the Haqqani network, a Taliban-affiliated group operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Boyle leveled the accusations in a terse statement he read on arrival in Toronto late October 13 with his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, and three children, who were freed on October 11 by Pakistani troops. / AFP PHOTO / Mike CARROCCETTO (Photo credit should read MIKE CARROCCETTO/AFP/Getty Images)
Joshua Boyle stands with his father Patrick Doyle (L) after arriving with his wife and three children to Toronto Pearson International Airport, nearly 5 years after he and his wife were abducted in Afghanistan in 2012 by the Taliban-allied Haqqani network, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, October 13, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Blinch
TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 12 - Linda and Patrick Boyle in their Smith Falls, ON. home awaiting the arrival of their son, daughter-in-law and three grandchildren who were rescued by the Pakistani army on Oct. 11. Joshua Boyle, 34, Caitlan Coleman, 31 were held hostage by the Haqqani network for five years. All three of their children, two sons 4 an 2 and a 2-month-old daughter were born in captivity. (Randy Risling/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
Freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle talks on the phone outside the Boyle family home in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on October 14, 2017. Boyle, whose family was freed from captivity in Pakistan last week, arrived back home early October 14. He accused his kidnappers of murdering his baby daughter and raping his wife during his family's years-long captivity by the Haqqani network, a Taliban-affiliated group operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Boyle leveled the accusations in a terse statement he read on arrival in Toronto late October 13 with his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, and three children, who were freed on October 11 by Pakistani troops. / AFP PHOTO / Mike CARROCCETTO (Photo credit should read MIKE CARROCCETTO/AFP/Getty Images)
Freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle talks on the phone as one of his children plays outside the Boyle's family home in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on October 14, 2017. Boyle, whose family was freed from captivity in Pakistan last week, arrived back home early October 14. He accused his kidnappers of murdering his baby daughter and raping his wife during his family's years-long captivity by the Haqqani network, a Taliban-affiliated group operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Boyle leveled the accusations in a terse statement he read on arrival in Toronto late October 13 with his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, and three children, who were freed on October 11 by Pakistani troops. / AFP PHOTO / Mike CARROCCETTO (Photo credit should read MIKE CARROCCETTO/AFP/Getty Images)
Joshua Boyle speaks to the media after arriving with his wife and three children to Toronto Pearson International Airport, nearly 5 years after he and his wife were abducted in Afghanistan in 2012 by the Taliban-allied Haqqani network, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, October 13, 2017. REUTERS/Mark Blinch
Freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle talks on the phone outside the Boyle family home in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on October 14, 2017. Boyle, whose family was freed from captivity in Pakistan last week, arrived back home early October 14. He accused his kidnappers of murdering his baby daughter and raping his wife during his family's years-long captivity by the Haqqani network, a Taliban-affiliated group operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Boyle leveled the accusations in a terse statement he read on arrival in Toronto late October 13 with his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, and three children, who were freed on October 11 by Pakistani troops. / AFP PHOTO / Mike CARROCCETTO (Photo credit should read MIKE CARROCCETTO/AFP/Getty Images)
Journalists wait outside freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle's family home in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on October 14, 2017. Freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle, who arrived back home early October 14 morning, accused his kidnappers of murdering his baby daughter and raping his wife during his family's years-long captivity by the Haqqani network, a Taliban-affiliated group operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Boyle leveled the accusations in a terse statement he read on arrival in Toronto late October 13 with his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, and three children, who were freed on October 11 by Pakistani troops. / AFP PHOTO / Mike Carroccetto (Photo credit should read MIKE CARROCCETTO/AFP/Getty Images)
Journalists work outside freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle's family home in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on October 14, 2017. Freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle, who arrived back home early October 14 morning, accused his kidnappers of murdering his baby daughter and raping his wife during his family's years-long captivity by the Haqqani network, a Taliban-affiliated group operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Boyle leveled the accusations in a terse statement he read on arrival in Toronto late October 13 with his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, and three children, who were freed on October 11 by Pakistani troops. / AFP PHOTO / Mike Carroccetto (Photo credit should read MIKE CARROCCETTO/AFP/Getty Images)
Security guards outside freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle's family home in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on October 14, 2017. Freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle, who arrived back home early October 14 morning, accused his kidnappers of murdering his baby daughter and raping his wife during his family's years-long captivity by the Haqqani network, a Taliban-affiliated group operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Boyle leveled the accusations in a terse statement he read on arrival in Toronto late October 13 with his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, and three children, who were freed on October 11 by Pakistani troops. / AFP PHOTO / Mike Carroccetto (Photo credit should read MIKE CARROCCETTO/AFP/Getty Images)
Patrick Boyle, father of freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle, puts up a bedsheet to block the view of journalists camped outside the Boyle family home in Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada, on October 14, 2017. Freed Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle, who arrived back home early October 14 morning, accused his kidnappers of murdering his baby daughter and raping his wife during his family's years-long captivity by the Haqqani network, a Taliban-affiliated group operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Boyle leveled the accusations in a terse statement he read on arrival in Toronto late October 13 with his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, and three children, who were freed on October 11 by Pakistani troops. / AFP PHOTO / Mike Carroccetto (Photo credit should read MIKE CARROCCETTO/AFP/Getty Images)
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Boyle told The Star that some of the cells they were held in were no larger than a bathtub, and the only entertainment they were provided was a piece of chalk and a slate.

He also recounted horrific details of the ordeal, alleging that his wife had been raped by the captors and was forced to abort a baby.

Coleman and Boyle had three children in captivity, who are now adjusting to life in Canada. Coleman was five months pregnant when she was kidnapped, and the couple told The Star they kept Coleman's second pregnancy secret, right up until the moment of birth.

The family was freed by Pakistani security officers, operating on US intelligence, in a bloody shootout that left their captors dead.

Boyle was initially reluctant to get on a US transport plane after being freed. One US official told The Associated Press that Boyle had been nervous about being in "custody" because of his background, though another official clarified that the family was not formally in US custody.

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President Donald Trump's inaugural parade
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President Donald Trump's inaugural parade

U.S. President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and son Barron walk during the inaugural parade from the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Pool)

Washington D.C. motorcycle police lead the inaugural parade for U.S. President Donald Trump after he was sworn in at the Capitol (background) in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

U.S. President Donald Trump (R) waves to supporters as he walks the parade route with first lady Melania Trump during the Inaugural Parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Donald J. Trump was sworn in today as the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

The family of US President Donald Trump arrives at the reviewing stand at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2107 following swearing-in ceremonies on Capitol Hill earlier today. From (L-R): son Barron, son Eric and wife Lara, daughters Ivanka and Tiffany and daughter-in-law Vanessa (extreme R).

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Newly inaugurated U.S. Vice President Mike Pence looks out the window of his limousine during the inauguration parade in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

The U.S. Army band "Pershing's Own" marches in the parade carrying U.S. President Donald Trump following his inauguration in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

U.S. President Donald Trump waves as he and his wife Melania walk during the inaugural Parade in Washington, January 20, 2017. Donald Trump was sworn in earlier as the 45th President of the United States.

(REUTERS/Lucas Jackson)

U.S. President Donald Trump waves from inside his limousine as he participates in the inaugural parade after his swearing in at the Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Ivanka Trump walks with her son Theo during the inaugural parade in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2107.� US President Donald Trump on Friday stepped out of his limousine along the inaugural parade route, briefly walking on Pennsylvania Avenue and waving to supporters with his wife Melania and young son Barron. Earlier, the president drove past a crowd of protesters chanting anti-Trump slogans and waving banners.

(DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and son Barron walk during the inaugural parade from the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Pool)

US President Donald Trump stands with First Lady Melania Trump at the Capitol Building before departing for the parade after Trump is sworn in on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/John Angelillo/Pool)

Supporters cheer as the presidential limousine drives up Pennsylvania Avenue to the White House surrounded by security detail after inauguration ceremonies for US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington,

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. President Donald Trump waves to supporters as he walks the parade route with first lady Melania Trump and son Barron Trump past the main reviewing stand in front of the White House during the Inaugural Parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Donald J. Trump was sworn in today as the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

US President Donald Trump walks his wife Melania surrounded by Secret Service officers outside the White House as the presidential inaugural parade winds through the nation's capital on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

Marchers take part in the inaugural parade of U.S. President Donald Trump in Washington, January 20, 2017. Donald Trump was sworn in as 45th President of the United States.

(REUTERS/Lucas Jackson)

The family of US President Donald Trump arrives at the reviewing stand at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2107 following swearing-in ceremonies on Capitol Hill earlier today. From (L-R): First Lady Melania Trump, son Barron, son Eric and wife Lara, daughters Ivanka and Tiffany and daughter-in-law Vanessa (extreme R).

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. President Donald Trump's Housing and Urban Development Secretary nominee Ben Carson arrives to take his seat for the inaugural parade in Washington, January 20, 2017. Donald Trump was sworn in as 45th President of the United States.

(REUTERS/Lucas Jackson)

US Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen wave as they arrive in front of the White House for the presidential inaugural parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Former Texas Governor Rick Perry arrives for the presidential inaugural parade in front of the White House on January 20, 2017, in Washington, DC. Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States.

(NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

A view of atmosphere at the Presidential Inaugural Parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images)

Participants march in period costume during the inaugural parade following U.S. President Donald Trump's swearing in at the Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Newly inaugurated U.S. President Donald Trump salutes as he presides over a military parade during Trump's swearing ceremony in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Mike Segar)

A view of atmosphere at the Presidential Inaugural Parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images)

US Defense Secretary nominee James Mattis arrives for the presidential inaugural parade in front of the White House on January 20, 2017, in Washington, DC. Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the Uniited States.

(NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

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The family took a commercial flight back to Canada.

Boyle's trip to Afghanistan raised eyebrows. He was formerly married to Zaynab Khadr, the older sister of Omar Khadr, a former Guantanamo Bay detainee, and the son of a prominent Al-Qaeda financier. Omar Khadr — then only 15 years old — was captured by US forces following a firefight that left a US Army Sergeant dead in 2002.

And Coleman's father, Jim Coleman, told "Good Morning America" on Friday: "Taking your pregnant wife to a very dangerous place, to me, and the kind of person I am, it's unconscionable."

Boyle responded, saying that he is a "harmless hippie," and that he and Coleman went to Afghanistan for humanitarian reasons.

"Anybody who knows me would laugh at the notion that I went with designs on becoming a combatant," Boyle told The Star.

As for his captors, Boyle told The Star the Haqqani network "are people who have no relationships in life that are not purely mercenary."

"They have no real friends, only cohorts. They have no wives, children. Those we met who were not orphans spoke of hating their parents," Boyle added.

For now, Boyle said he's looking forward to spending quality time with his kids. Boyle told The Star his oldest child, Jonah, aged 4, was "so excited" to be free "he just wanted to sit on his pile of toys with a gigantic smile on his face."

"He wanted to sit there and bask in being 'no bandi' after all of this time," Boyle said. "Bandi," according to the Star, is what Haqqani captors call their hostages.

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SEE ALSO: The recently freed Canadian captive says the Taliban raped his wife and killed his daughter

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