Cops release daunting 911 calls from Fla. nursing home after Hurricane Irma

The 911 calls were calm at first.

The staff at the sweltering Florida nursing home soon panicked as patient after patient stopped breathing due to the facility’s catastrophic loss of air conditioning in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

“Oh, my God. This is crazy,” an overwhelmed nurse sighed, while struggling to look up a patient’s information on a computer.

She was downstairs and making the fifth exasperated emergency call from the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills on Sept. 13 as nurses on a floor above her tried desperately to save a woman in cardiac arrest.

Another employee could be heard muttering, “Whatta night.”

17 PHOTOS
Care facilities hit by Hurricane Irma
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Care facilities hit by Hurricane Irma
Two days after Hurricane Irma, Rodriquez Benjamin, 86, stands in the door of his room waiting for help to arrive, without power, food, or water at at Cypress Run, an assisted living facility, in Immokalee, Florida, U.S., September 12, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills is seen in Hollywood, north of Miami, Florida, U.S., September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Innerarity
Guillermo Nunez speaks to the media regarding the condition of Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills patient, Saga Garcia, the mother of his sister in law in front of the Center in Hollywood, north of Miami, Florida, U.S., September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Innerarity
Firefighters cross police tape with the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills in the background in Hollywood, north of Miami, Florida, U.S. September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Innerarity
Guillermo Nunez speaks to the media regarding the condition of Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills patient, Saga Garcia, the mother of his sister in law in front of the Center in Hollywood, north of Miami, Florida, U.S. September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Innerarity
City of Hollywood police officers were on hand for crowds of people and heavy traffic at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills in Hollywood, north of Miami, Florida, U.S., September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Innerarity
A street sign lies askew across the traffic circle from the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills in Hollywood, north of Miami, Florida, U.S., September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Innerarity
Two days after Hurricane Irma, Mary Mitchell, 82, lays on a hospital bed in her room, without power, food, or water at Cypress Run, an assisted living facility, in Immokalee, Florida, U.S., September 12, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
Two days after Hurricane Irma, William James, 83, sits without power, food or water, in his room at Cypress Run, an assisted living facility, in Immokalee, Florida, U.S., September 12, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
Two days after Hurricane Irma, an elderly resident stand in a dark hallway at Cypress Run, an assisted living facility without power, food, or water, in Immokalee, Florida, U.S., September 12, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
CAPE CORAL, FL -SEP 12: Barbara asked to be positioned near a large window to enjoy both the light and the slight breeze that came through the window hoping to get relief from the heat. -A visit to the Cape Coral Shores, a memory care facility, revealed difficult conditions for residents due to the fact that the home is still without power after Hurricane Irma. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
CAPE CORAL, FL -SEP 12: Bob had been wearing protective cloth sleeves for his skin condition but as temperatures rose he was hot and uncomfortable so the nursing staff removed them to help him cool down. -A visit to the Cape Coral Shores, a memory care facility, revealed difficult conditions for residents due to the fact that the home is still without power after Hurricane Irma. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
CAPE CORAL, FL -SEP 12: Russell is comforted by his guardian Liz Pendy as Russell and other residents endure uncomfortable conditions at the memory care facility that has no power. -A visit to the Cape Coral Shores, a memory care facility, revealed difficult conditions for residents due to the fact that the home is still without power after Hurricane Irma. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
CAPE CORAL, FL -SEP 12: Kathleen watches traffic go by and is quite bored at the Cape Coral Shores memory care facility. She'd prefer to be watching her favorite TV shows or listening to the radio but cannot due to the power outage. -A visit to the Cape Coral Shores, a memory care facility, revealed difficult conditions for residents due to the fact that the home is still without power after Hurricane Irma. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
CAPE CORAL, FL -SEP 12: Louis, who is an army veteran who fought in World War II, is among those living in difficult conditions at the Cape Coral Shores memory care facility. -A visit to the Cape Coral Shores, a memory care facility, revealed difficult conditions for residents due to the fact that the home is still without power after Hurricane Irma. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
CAPE CORAL, FL -SEP 12: Residents of the Cape Coral Shores memory care facility kill time because due to the power outage they can't watch TV or listen to the radio. They also have no air conditioning. -A visit to the Cape Coral Shores, a memory care facility, revealed difficult conditions for residents due to the fact that the home is still without power after Hurricane Irma. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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Calls released by the Hollywood Police Department on Monday show employees began calling at 3 a.m. and those pleas for help continued for another three hours. Nurses were reporting triple-digit fevers, respiratory distress and cardiac arrest for several elderly patients.

Operators at the Broward County Emergency Operation Center soon realized this was not an isolated incident after asking for the umpteempth time if additional personnel would be needed.

“You guys have a few other paramedics here, so I’m not sure,” the nursing home staffer replied.

The operators quickly dispatched for additional help, believing “something” was going on and that people had died.

“The call that came in was a little daunting,” the operator told a nearby hospital. “It looks like they need more assistance.”

The nursing home would lose eight patients that first day, and six more would die through early October. Their ages ranged from 57 to 99.

Police are conducting a criminal probe into the deaths and why about 150 of the home’s patients were never evacuated to Memorial Regional Hospital — which was across the street.

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NASA photos show islands before and after Hurricane Irma
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NASA photos show islands before and after Hurricane Irma

Virgin Islands on August 25, 2017

(Photo via NASA)

Virgin Islands on September 10, 2017

(Photo via NASA)

Virgin Gorda before and after Hurricane Irma

(Photo via NASA)

Barbuda and Antigua on August 21, 2017

(Photo via NASA)

Barbuda and Antigua on September 8, 2017

(Photo via NASA)

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No arrests have been made.

Since the mass deaths, the state has revoked the nursing home’s license and Gov. Rick Scott signed an executive order for similar facilities to install back-up generators for air conditioning.

The power had been off since Sept. 10, when the monster storm ravaged most of south Florida.

With News Wire Services

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