Ancient Roman theater unearthed in Jerusalem

A dramatic archaeological discovery was made near Jerusalem’s Western Wall.

Archaeologists unearthed a well-preserved ancient Roman theater.

They found it underneath the Western Wall.

It’s believed to date back to the 2nd century when Jerusalem was a Roman colony.

16 PHOTOS
Ancient theater discovered near Western Wall
See Gallery
Ancient theater discovered near Western Wall
Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologist Dr. Joe Uziel stands inside a theatre-like structure during a media tour to reveal the structure which was discovered during excavation works underneath Wilson's Arch in the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City October 16, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologist Tehillah Lieberman walks atop stones lying besides a part of the Western Wall, during a media tour revealing a theatre-like structure which was discovered during excavation works underneath Wilson's Arch in the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City October 16, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologist Tehillah Lieberman stands inside a theatre-like structure during a media tour to reveal the structure which was discovered during excavation works underneath Wilson's Arch in the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City October 16, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologist Tehillah Lieberman stands next to a part of the Western Wall, during a media tour revealing a theatre-like structure which was discovered during excavation works underneath Wilson's Arch, in the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City October 16, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
A worker from the Israeli Antiquity A uthority site at the recently discovered ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary that was found at the foot of the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Reporters visit the recently discovered ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary that was found by the Israeli Antiquity Authority at the foot of the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Joe Uziel, an archeologist from the Israeli Antiquity Authority, works on a recently discovered ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary that was found at the foot of the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers restore a ceiling of the Western Wall tunnels near the site where Israeli Antiquity Authority recently discovered an ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Tehillah Lieberman, an archeologist of the Israeli Antiquity Authority, shows journalists a recently discovered new part of the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA / The erroneous mention[s] appearing in the metadata of this photo by MENAHEM KAHANA has been modified in AFP systems in the following manner: [the recently discovered of new part of Western Wall ] instead of [a recently discovered ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary]. Please immediately remove the erroneous mention[s] from all your online services and delete it (them) from your servers. If you have been authorized by AFP to distribute it (them) to third parties, please ensure that the same actions are carried out by them. Failure to promptly comply with these instructions will entail liability on your part for any continued or post notification usage. Therefore we thank you very much for all your attention and prompt action. We are sorry for the inconvenience this notification may cause and remain at your disposal for any further information you may require. (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Tehillah Lieberman, an archeologist of the Israeli Antiquity Authority, shows journalists a recently discovered ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary that was found at the foot of the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Tehillah Lieberman, an archeologist of the Israeli Antiquity Authority, shows journalists a recently discovered ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary that was found at the foot of the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Joe Uziel, an archeologist from the Israeli Antiquity Authority, works on a recently discovered ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary that was found at the foot of the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
A journalist looks at part of a recently discovered ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary that was found by the Israeli Antiquity Authority at the foot of the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Joe Uziel, an archeologist from the Israeli Antiquity Authority, shows journalists a recently discovered ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary that was found at the foot of the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Tehillah Lieberman, an archeologist of the Israeli Antiquity Authority, shows journalists a recently discovered new part of the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA / The erroneous mention[s] appearing in the metadata of this photo by MENAHEM KAHANA has been modified in AFP systems in the following manner: [the recently discovered of new part of Western Wall ] instead of [a recently discovered ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary]. Please immediately remove the erroneous mention[s] from all your online services and delete it (them) from your servers. If you have been authorized by AFP to distribute it (them) to third parties, please ensure that the same actions are carried out by them. Failure to promptly comply with these instructions will entail liability on your part for any continued or post notification usage. Therefore we thank you very much for all your attention and prompt action. We are sorry for the inconvenience this notification may cause and remain at your disposal for any further information you may require. (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Researchers believe the 200 seat theater was designed for acoustic performances or city council meetings.

However, evidence suggests that construction stopped and it was actually never used.

That could have been caused by the Bar Kokhba revolt against the Romans.

Archaeologists say the discovery helps contribute to a better understanding of Jerusalem.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.