Report: Sen. Tom Cotton being considered for top CIA post

Apparent tensions between President Trump and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson have some expecting a shift in key government positions. 

According to Axios, Senator Tom Cotton figures prominently in that potential shuffle. 

The site reports that if Rex Tillerson should, for one reason or another, vacate his post, CIA Director Mike Pompeo is the person likely to fill that gap. 

"Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) was considered for CIA director (and SecDef) during the transition, and is a candidate for CIA again," Axios notes. "Cotton is one of the few senators with an easy relationship with Trump, talking to him a few times a week, giving him advice about top jobs (that Trump has taken), and planting the seed for the Iran policy announced Friday."

RELATED: A look at Sen. Tom Cotton

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HOT SPRINGS, AR - APRIL 26: U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton looks for questions in a crowd of supporters at a Republican headquarters office April 26, 2014 in Hot Springs, Ark. Sen. Pryor is in a tight reelection campaign with Republican opponent , U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton. (Photo by Stephen B. Thornton for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 31: Rep. Tom Cotton, Republican candidate for U.S. Senate challenging incumbent Sen. Mark Pryor, D-Ark., speaks during a campaign rally in Mountain View, Ark., on Friday, Oct. 31, 2014. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 30: Rep. Tom Cotton, Republican candidate for U.S. Senate challenging incumbent Sen. Mark Pryor, D-Ark., speaks with Conner Cadle, age 6, of Weiner, Ark., at the Jonesboro Victory Office before helping phone bank to get out the vote on Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014 in Jonesboro, Ark. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 31: Rep. Tom Cotton, Republican candidate for U.S. Senate challenging incumbent Sen. Mark Pryor, D-Ark., poses for photos after speaking at a campaign rally in Mountain View, Ark., on Friday, Oct. 31, 2014. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 31: Rep. Tom Cotton, Republican candidate for U.S. Senate challenging incumbent Sen. Mark Pryor, D-Ark., poses for photos after speaking at a campaign rally in Mountain View, Ark., on Friday, Oct. 31, 2014. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Rep. Tom Cotton (R-AR) Senator-Elect, appears on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Sunday Nov. 30, 2014. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 6: Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., his wife Anna and Vice President Joe Biden participate in the re-enactment swearing-in ceremony in the Old Senate Chamber on Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC MARCH 11: Senator Tom Cotton (R-Arkansas) is photographed in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, March 11, 2015. Cotton drafted the letter to Iran signed by GOP Senators. (Photo by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 13: Freshman GOP Senators pose for a group photo with Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kan., in front of the Ohio Clock in the Capitol on Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015. From left are Sens. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., David Perdue, R-Ga., Michael Rounds, R-S.D., Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, Steve Daines, R-Mont., Ben Sasse, R-Neb., Dan Sullivan, R-AK, Jerry Moran, R-Kan., Bill Cassidy, R-La., Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., Tom Cotton, R-Ark., and James Lankford, R-Okla. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
KIEV, UKRAINE - JUNE 20: U.S. Senator Tom Cotton (L) speaks during a joint press conference with U.S. Senators John Barrasso (R) and John McCain (not seen) in Kiev, Ukraine, on June 20, 2015. (Photo by Vladimir Shtanko/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Senator Tom Cotton (R-AR) speaks on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as its presidential nominee. Some 2,000 delegates descended on a tightly secured Cleveland arena where Trump's wife will take center stage later in the day to make a personal pitch to voters that her billionaire husband is the best candidate for the White House. / AFP / ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Senator Tom Cotton, a Republican from Arkansas, right, stands inside the Quicken Loans Arena 'The Q' ahead of the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Sunday, July 17, 2016. A key Republican National Convention committee crushed a long-shot attempt by rogue delegates to block Donald Trump's nomination, as internal strife that's roiled the party for much of the past decade was on full display Thursday amid fights over governing rules for the next four years. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 1: Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., participates in Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's media availability in the U.S. Capitol with Republican members of the Senate Veterans' Affairs and Armed Services Committees to discuss cloture vote on the Milcon/VA appropriations bill cloture vote and next week's National Defense Authorization Act Conference Report on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Senator Tom Cotton, a Republican from Arkansas, waves before speaking during the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Monday, July 18, 2016. Republican factions trying to stop Donald Trump's nomination noisily disrupted a vote on party convention rules, displaying the fissures in the party on the first day of its national convention. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Senator Tom Cotton, a Republican from Arkansas, speaks during the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Monday, July 18, 2016. Republican factions trying to stop Donald Trump's nomination noisily disrupted a vote on party convention rules, displaying the fissures in the party on the first day of its national convention. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Before becoming a U.S. Senator, Cotton graduated from Harvard, worked for a highly-regarded law firm, and served in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Over the past months, he has emerged as one of Trump’s most consistent defenders. 

While many have found the president’s blunt manner rather cringe-worthy, in June, Cotton told the New York Times, "What you see is what you get with the president. I think that’s a good measure of a man."

Just last week amid talk of department chiefs who strongly disagree with Trump’s desire to change terms of the nuclear deal with Iran, Cotton voiced support for the President. 

“When you’re a Cabinet member [and]…you think the president is wrong, you have a duty to try to present to him the best facts and the best thinking to help him see it in a different light. Maybe you can, but if he doesn’t, and he says, ‘No, I want to do it my way,’ then your job is to move out and execute. And if you feel strongly enough, then you have to resign," he said during a Politico podcast.

RELATED: Current CIA Director Mike Pompeo

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CIA director Mike Pompeo
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CIA director Mike Pompeo

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., holds a meeting with CIA Director nominee Rep. Mike Pompeo, R-Kan., in his Capitol office on Monday, Dec. 5, 2016.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Mike Pompeo (L) is sworn in as CIA Director by Vice President Mike Pence (R) as wife Susan Pompeo (2nd L) looks on at Eisenhower Executive Office Building January 23, 2017 in Washington, DC. Pompeo was confirmed for the position by the Senate this evening.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

UNITED STATES - JUNE 28: Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., right, chairman of the Select Committee on Benghazi, conducts a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center, June 28, 2016, to announce the Committee's report on the 2012 attacks in Libya that killed four Americans. Rep. Mike Pompeo, R-Kan., also appears. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Representative Mike Pompeo, a Republican from Kansas and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) director nominee for President-elect Donald Trump, swears in to a Senate Intelligence Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017. Pompeo is seeking to reassure senators that he can shift from an outspoken policymaker to an objective spy chief if confirmed.

(Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., holds a meeting with CIA Director nominee Rep. Mike Pompeo, R-Kan., in his Capitol office on Monday, Dec. 5, 2016.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Representative Mike Pompeo (R-KS) arrives to testify before a Senate Intelligence hearing on his nomination of to be become director of the CIA at Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 12, 2017.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence (R) finishes swearing in Mike Pompeo, flanked by his wife Susan Pompeo, to be director of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in the vice president's ceremonial office in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 23, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Mike Pompeo gets a hug from supporter Jennifer O'Connor after arriving at the Sedgwick County Republican headquarters at Market Centre in Wichita, Kansas, on Tuesday, November 6, 2012.

(Fernando Salazar/Wichita Eagle/MCT via Getty Images)

Adam Schiff (D-CA) left, Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-KS) center, and moderator Chuck Todd, right, appear on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Sunday, Oct. 18, 2015.

(William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's nominee for the director of the CIA, Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-KS) attends his confirmation hearing before the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee on January 12, 2017 in Washington, DC. Mr. Pompeo is a former Army officer who graduated first in his class from West Point.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-KS) listens as Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS) speaks during his confirmation hearing to be the director of the CIA before the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee on January 12, 2017 in Washington, DC. Mr. Pompeo is a former Army officer who graduated first in his class from West Point.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Rep. Mike Pompeo, R-Kan., speaks during the news conference before a group of House Republican freshmen walked to the Senate to deliver a letter to Majority Leader Harry Reid on Wednesday, March 30, 2011. The letter called on the Senate to pass a long term continuing resolution with spending cuts.

(Photo By Bill Clark/Roll Call)

US Congressman Mike Pompeo (C), R-Kansas, sits in the dark after a power failure with US Senator Pat Roberts (L), a former Chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, and former US Senator Bob Dole (R), R-Kansas, as he prepares to testify before the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, January 12, 2017, on his nomination to be director of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in the Trump administration.

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Rep. Mike Pompeo, R-Kan., center, nominee for director of the Central Intelligence Agency, is introduced by former Sen. Bob Dole, R-Kan., right, and Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., during Pompeo's Senate Select Intelligence Committee confirmation hearing in Dirksen Building, January 12, 2017. The hearing was moved from Hart Building due to a peer outage.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Incoming Trump administration cabinet secretary nominees including Secretary of State nominee Rex Tillerson (L-R), Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) Director nominee Mike Pompeo and Defense Secretary nominee James Mattis arrive for meetings at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 13, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Mike Pompeo (2nd L), flanked by his wife Susan Pompeo (2nd R) and their son Nick Pompeo (R), signs his affidavit of appointment after being sworn in as director of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) by U.S. Vice President Mike Pence (L) in Pence's ceremonial office in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 23, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

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