Poll: Most Republicans think their congressional leaders 'don't like' Trump

In a seemingly impromptu press conference, President Trump on Monday blamed Congress for inaction on key campaign promises like health care reform -- saying they are "not getting the job done."

According to a new poll, American Republicans may think Capitol Hill inaction within their own party is intentional.

The new poll from CBS News reveals 39 percent of Republicans feel congressional lawmakers of their own party "don't like" Trump and are actively trying to undermine him, while an additional 37 percent think congressional Republicans don't like President Trump "but pretend to" in order to try to get their agenda passed.

That's a total 76 percent of Republicans who believe GOP congressional leaders do not like the sitting president of their own party.

RELATED: President Trump hosts news conference in Rose Garden

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US President Donald Trump speaks to the press in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, October 16, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 16: U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) talk to reporters in the Rose Garden following a lunch meeting at the White House October 16, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump and McConnell tried to erase reporting that they were not on the same page with the GOP legislative agenda and priorities. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 16: U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) talk to reporters in the Rose Garden following a lunch meeting at the White House October 16, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump and McConnell tried to erase reporting that they were not on the same page with the GOP legislative agenda and priorities. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 16: U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) talk to reporters in the Rose Garden following a lunch meeting at the White House October 16, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump and McConnell tried to erase reporting that they were not on the same page with the GOP legislative agenda and priorities. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 16: U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) talk to reporters in the Rose Garden following a lunch meeting at the White House October 16, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump and McConnell tried to erase reporting that they were not on the same page with the GOP legislative agenda and priorities. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 16: U.S. President Donald Trump (R) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) talk to reporters in the Rose Garden following a lunch meeting at the White House October 16, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump and McConnell tried to erase reporting that they were not on the same page with the GOP legislative agenda and priorities. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 16: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters in the Rose Garden during a news conference with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) following a lunch meeting at the White House October 16, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump and McConnell tried to erase reporting that they were not on the same page with the GOP legislative agenda and priorities. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump, left, speaks as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican from Kentucky, listens during a news conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Oct. 16, 2017. Trump and McConnell appeared to give themselves some breathing room on their goal of completing a tax overhaul before year's end in remarks that emphasized the difficulty of passing major legislation. Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 16: U.S. President Donald Trump (L) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walk into the Rose Garden to talk to reporters following a lunch meeting at the White House October 16, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump and McConnell tried to erase reporting that they were not on the same page with the GOP legislative agenda and priorities. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump leaves after speaking to the press in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, October 16, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
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The poll also shows a slim 20 percent of Americans think that congressional Republicans should "do what the president wants" because he's their leader.

These findings come as tensions fuel between the 45th president and those Capitol Hill dissenters who voice opposition to Trump in legislative and personal ways. That list has previously included Sen. Bob Corker, Sen. John McCain, Sen. Lindsey Graham and even Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell himself.

Speaking out on the legislative branch's inability to move forward Trump's most central campaign pillars like a repeal and replace of Obamacare and U.S.-Mexico border wall, former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon said recently that he would back candidates challenging incumbent GOP officials -- a strategy McConnell was quick to shut down on Monday.

"You have to nominate people who can actually win. Winners make policy and losers go home," McConnell said. "Our operating approach will be to support our incumbents and in open seats, to seek to help nominate people who can actually win in November. That’s my approach ― that’s the way you keep a governing majority."

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