‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ removed from Mississippi school district curriculum; Twitter enraged

A Mississippi school district has pulled “To Kill a Mockingbird” from eighth grade classrooms because the novel “makes people uncomfortable.”

According to The Sun Herald, the school board did not vote on the move, but rather it was an administrative and department decision made on Wednesday or Thursday.

“There were complaints about it. There is some language in the book that makes people uncomfortable, and we can teach the same lesson with other books,” Kenny Holloway, Biloxi School Board vice president told the paper. “It’s still in our library. But they’re going to use another book in the 8th grade course.”

The Harper Lee novel has repeatedly appeared on the American Library Association’s list of the most banned or challenged books due to repeated use of a racial slur and its exploration of racism and discrimination.

The Biloxi decision was met with widespread condemnation on social media.

Progress is built on a steep incline and we backslide fast. Books like To Kill A Mockingbird are there to lift us when we need it. Like now. 

Read original story ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Removed From Mississippi School District Curriculum; Twitter Enraged At TheWrap

Related: Lee throughout her life

14 PHOTOS
Harper Lee through the years
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Harper Lee through the years
circa 1960: American author Harper Lee smiling. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Author of To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee, in local courthouse while visiting her home town. (Photo by Donald Uhrbrock/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
Author of To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee, while visiting her home town. (Photo by Donald Uhrbrock/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
In an August 31, 2001, file image at the Stage Coach Cafe in Stockton, Ala., the author Harper Lee, who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird.' A recently-discovered sequel, 'Go Set a Watchman,' is due to be published in July 2015. (Terrence Antonio James/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 19: Writer Harper Lee attends the reception prior to the Library Foundation of Los Angeles 2005 Awards Dinner honoring Harper Lee at the Richard J. Riordan Central Library on May 19, 2005 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Stephen Shugerman/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 19: Writer Harper Lee (R) receives her award at the Library Foundation of Los Angeles 2005 Awards Dinner honoring Harper Lee at the City National Plaza on May 19, 2005 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Stephen Shugerman/Getty Images)
Harper Lee (Photo by Lee Celano/WireImage)
Author Harper Lee (center) signs an original edition of 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (Photo by Lee Celano/WireImage)
NEW YORK - MARCH 13: (U.S. TABS AND HOLLYWOOD REPORTER OUT) Playwright Horton Foote and writer Harper Lee listen to actor Dame Edna read a poem as Foote is honored by the Signature Theatre Company on the eve of his 90th birthday at the Ritz Carlton March 13, 2006 in New York City. (Photo by Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - NOVEMBER 05: U.S. President George W. Bush (L) hangs a Presidential Medal of Freedom on the neck of Harper Lee (C), Pulitzer Prize winner and the author of 'To Kill A Mockingbird,' during a presentation ceremony for the medal's 2007 recipients in the East Room of the White House November 5, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Medal of Freedom is given to those who have made remarkable contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, culture, or other private or public endeavors. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - NOVEMBER 05: U.S. President George W. Bush (R) takes Pulitzer Prize winner and 'To Kill A Mockingbird' author Harper Lee by the arm before presenting her with the 2007 Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House November 5, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Medal of Freedom is given to those who have made remarkable contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, culture, or other private or public endeavors. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - NOVEMBER 05: Pulitzer Prize winner and 'To Kill A Mockingbird' author Harper Lee smiles before receiving the 2007 Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House November 5, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Medal of Freedom is given to those who have made remarkable contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, culture, or other private or public endeavors. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Copies of Harper Lee's 'Go Set a Watchman' are on display as part of a global release at a bookstore in Seoul on July 14, 2015. Copies of Lee's eagerly awaited, but controversial second novel flew off the shelves more than half a century after the groundbreaking success of 'To Kill a Mockingbird.' AFP PHOTO / JUNG YEON-JE (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
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