Mysterious radiation found in air across Europe baffles scientists

A substance of mysterious origin is being found throughout Europe, as weather stations in several countries, including Germany, Italy, and France have detected spikes in airborne radiation. 

The radiation is caused by an isotope known as Ruthenium, and Germany’s Federal Office for Radiation Protection claims the particles originated in the Ural mountains, in western Russia.

A representative from the same organization says the source is unlikely to be from a nuclear power plant, but it's origins are unclear.

The Russian state atomic energy corporation Rosatom, rejected claims that the radiation comes from Russia. 

"The radiation situation around all Russian nuclear facilities is within the norm and corresponds to natural background radiation," Rosatom said according to RT

RELATED: Radioactive boars found in Japan 

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Radioactive boars in Japan
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Radioactive boars in Japan
A wild boar is seen in a booby trap near a residential area in an evacuation zone near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, February 28, 2017. Picture taken February 28, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
Wild boars are seen in a booby trap as a member of Tomioka Town's animal control hunters group, holds a pellet gun at a residential area in an evacuation zone near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 2, 2017. Picture taken March 2, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
Wild boars which killed by a pellet gun in a booby trap, are seen on a truck at a residential area in an evacuation zone near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 2, 2017. Picture taken March 2, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
Wild boars which killed by a pellet gun in a booby trap, are seen at a residential area in an evacuation zone near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 2, 2017. Picture taken March 2, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
A wild boar is seen at a residential area in an evacuation zone near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 1, 2017. Picture taken March 1, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
A member of Tomioka Town's animal control hunters group, holds a pellet gun to kill wild boars which are in a booby trap at a residential area in an evacuation zone near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 2, 2017. Picture taken March 2, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
Wild boars killed by a pellet gun are seen in a booby trap at a residential area in an evacuation zone near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 2, 2017. Picture taken March 2, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
Members of Tomioka Town's animal control hunters group hold a meeting before looking around booby traps for wild boars at a meeting place in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 2, 2017. Picture taken March 2, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
A wild boar walks on a street at a residential area in an evacuation zone near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 1, 2017. Picture taken March 1, 2017. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
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