Florida confirms its first locally transmitted Zika case of 2017

Florida has seen its first locally transmitted case of the Zika virus in 2017, state health officials confirmed this week.

According to a press release from the Florida Department of Health, it appears one partner in a couple contracted the virus while the pair traveled to Cuba, and was then bitten by a mosquito after returning home to Manatee County, Florida. That mosquito is then believed to have transmitted Zika to the other partner. Testing conducted this week showed a link between the two partners' Zika infections.

The case marks Florida's only local Zika transmission so far this year, though there have been 187 cases statewide in 2017, the vast majority of which have been travel-related. The state reported nearly 300 locally acquired Zika infections in 2016, according to the Orlando Sentinel.

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First twins born with Zika
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First twins born with Zika
Raquel Barbosa poses with her twin daughters Heloa and Heloisa, both 10 months old and both born with microcephaly, in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil, February 8, 2017. Picture taken February 8, 2017. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Raquel Barbosa bathes her daughter Heloisa, who has a twin sister named Heloa, both 10 months old and both born with microcephaly, at her house in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil, February 8, 2017. Picture taken February 8, 2017. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Marcelo da Silva carries his daughter Heloa, who has a twin sister named Heloisa, both 10 months old and both born with microcephaly, in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil, February 8, 2017. Picture taken February 8, 2017. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Heloisa, who has a twin sister named Heloa, both 10 months old and both born with microcephaly, is pictured at her house in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil, February 8, 2017. Picture taken February 8, 2017. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Raquel Barbosa walks with her twin daughters Heloa and Heloisa, both 10 months old and both born with microcephaly, in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil, February 8, 2017. Picture taken February 8, 2017. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Raquel Barbosa poses with her daughter Heloisa, who has a twin sister named Heloa, both 10 months old and both born with microcephaly, at her house in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil, February 8, 2017. Picture taken February 8, 2017. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Raquel Barbosa (R) and her mother Maria Jose pose with twins Heloisa and Heloa, both 10 months old and both born with microcephaly, in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil, February 8, 2017. Raquel Barbosa is mother of the twins. Picture taken February 8, 2017. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Raquel Barbosa (L) and her husband Marcelo da Silva pose with their twins children Heloisa and Heloa, both 10 months old and both born with microcephaly, in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil, February 8, 2017. Picture taken February 8, 2017. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Maria Jose carries her granddaughter Heloa, who has a twin sister named Heloisa, both 10 months old and both born with microcephaly, in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil, February 8, 2017. Picture taken February 8, 2017. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Maria Jose poses with her granddaughter Heloa, who has a twin sister named Heloisa, both 10 months old and both born with microcephaly, in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil, February 8, 2017. Picture taken February 8, 2017. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
Twins Heloisa (L) and Heloa, both 10 months old and both born with microcephaly, are pictured at their house in Areia, Paraiba state, Brazil, February 8, 2017. Picture taken February 8, 2017. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Florida health officials said there is "no evidence of ongoing, active transmission of Zika," and that mosquito-reduction activities were being conducted to prevent further spread of the virus.

Zika can be passed on by a mosquito as well as by sexual activity. It causes only minor flu-like symptoms in adults – if any symptoms at all – but can cause severe birth defects in babies whose mothers become infected while pregnant.

 

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