The arm of a bronze statue was discovered at the underwater ruins of Antikythera

Divers have returned to the site of the Antikythera shipwreck and discovered a new treasure trove, this time of bronze and marble statue fragments. 

The “Return To Antikythera” team found items like a bronze arm that leads scientists to believe there are more statues buried around the wrecked vessel. 

The divers in partnership with the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports recovered the ancient relics at the site between September 4th and 20th.

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TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SOPHIE MAKRIS - A picture taken at the Archaeological Museum in Athens on September 14, 2014 shows a piece of the so-called Antikythera Mechanism, a 2nd-century BC device known as the world's oldest computer, which was discovered by sponge divers in 1900 off a remote Greek island in the Aegean,. The mechanism is a complex mechanical computer which tracked astronomical phenomena and the cycles of the Solar System . AFP PHOTO / LOUISA GOULIAMAKI (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SOPHIE MAKRIS - A picture taken at the Archaeological Museum in Athens on September 14, 2014 shows pieces of the so-called Antikythera Mechanism, a 2nd-century BC device known as the world's oldest computer, which was discovered by sponge divers in 1900 off a remote Greek island in the Aegean,. The mechanism is a complex mechanical computer which tracked astronomical phenomena and the cycles of the Solar System . AFP PHOTO / LOUISA GOULIAMAKI (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SOPHIE MAKRIS - A picture taken at the Archaeological Museum in Athens on September 14, 2014 shows pieces of the so-called Antikythera Mechanism, a 2nd-century BC device known as the world's oldest computer, which was discovered by sponge divers in 1900 off a remote Greek island in the Aegean,. The mechanism is a complex mechanical computer which tracked astronomical phenomena and the cycles of the Solar System . AFP PHOTO / LOUISA GOULIAMAKI (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Visitors look at the displayed fragments of the ancient Antikythera Mechanism at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Greece June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis/File photo
Fragments of the ancient Antikythera Mechanism are displayed at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Greece June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis
Fragments of the ancient Antikythera Mechanism are displayed at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Greece June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis/File photo
Detail of a fragment of the ancient Antikythera Mechanism displayed at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Greece June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis
Visitors look at the displayed fragments of the ancient Antikythera Mechanism at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Greece June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis
A fragment of the ancient Antikythera Mechanism is displayed at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Greece June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis
Fragments of the ancient Antikythera Mechanism are displayed at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Greece June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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Experts believe the ship carried a large quantity of luxury items, hundreds of which were recovered by legendary underwater explorer Jacques Cousteau in 1976.

Perhaps the most interesting find to come from the wreck is the celestial calculator known as the Antikythera mechanism which is believed to have been able to display dates, planetary cycles and eclipses among other uses. 

While the finds so far have been eye-opening, the researchers plan to return in the spring to uncover more of the sites watery ruins.

 

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