A 21-year-old who was shot in the chest during the Las Vegas shooting is suing the Mandalay Bay hotel

A victim of the Las Vegas shooting has filed a lawsuit against the Mandalay Bay hotel and resort. 

On Monday, Paige Gasper filed a lawsuit against Mandalay Bay and MGM Resorts International, Mandalay Bay's parent company.

The complaint alleges that the hotel was "negligent or grossly negligent" in failing to notice or take precautions against the shooter stockpiling guns, and that employees were not adequately trained to notice and report suspicious activity. 

RELATED: What we know about Las Vegas shooting suspect Stephen Paddock

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What we know about Las Vegas shooting suspect Stephen Paddock
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What we know about Las Vegas shooting suspect Stephen Paddock
Stephen Paddock, 64, allegedly opened fire from the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino on the Route 91 Harvest country music festival, leaving at least 59 people dead and hundreds injured.

(Social media/Handout via REUTERS)

He reportedly used a hammer-like tool to break out two windows at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.

(Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)

Stephen Paddock was reportedly a high-stakes gambler that lived in a retirement community in Mesquite, Nevada.

(REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus)

His father was Benjamin Hoskins Paddock, a bank robber and former FBI Most Wanted Fugitive.

(FBI/Handout via REUTERS)

Paddock killed himself before authorities breached his hotel room and investigators say he acted alone.

(REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus)

Paddock's girlfriend, Marilou Danley, was in the Philippines at the time of the shooting but he reportedly used her identification to check in at the Mandalay Bay hotel.

(Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department/Handout via REUTERS)

Stephen Paddock lived in this home in Melbourne, Florida from 2013 to 2015.

(Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)

Police said Paddock had no criminal record.

(Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)

NBC News reported that Paddock made several large gambling transactions in recent weeks, but that it wasn't clear if they were wins or losses.

(Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)

Paddock reportedly purchased firearms at  Guns & Guitars, a gun shop in Mesquite, Nevada. 

(Photo by Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images)

Paddock's brother, Eric, said his sibling belonged to no political or religious organizations, and had no history of mental illness.

 (Photo by Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Paddock's brother described him as a "wealthy guy" and said he liked to play video poker and go on cruises.

(Photo by Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images)

He worked as an accountant and had real estate investments, according to the Washington Post. 

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Paddock had his pilot license and owned at least one plane, according to Reuters.

(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)
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Concert organizer Live Nation Entertainment Inc., bump stock maker Slide Fire Solutions LP, and the estate of Stephen Paddock were also named in the complaint. 

Gasper was shot in the chest when Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock opened fire on 22,000 people attending a music festival. According to the complaint, the bullet shattered her ribs and lacerated her liver. Gasper was then reportedly trampled by fleeing concert goers, before a Good Samaritan helped her take cover and drove her to a hospital. 

Paddock stockpiled weapons in his Mandalay Bay hotel room before firing from the windows of his suite on the 32nd floor into the crowd, killing 59 people and wounding about 500 others.

RELATED: Las Vegas mass shooting survivors

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Las Vegas mass shooting survivors
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Las Vegas mass shooting survivors
Paola Bautista, 39, from Fontana, California, (R) sits in her hospital bed next to her sister Daisy Bautista at Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center after being shot at the Route 91 music festival mass shooting next to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Braden Matejka, 30, (L) and his girlfriend Amanda Homulos, 23, from British Columbia, Canada sit outside Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center after he was discharged after being shot at the Route 91 music festival mass shooting next to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: Kassidy Owen, 22, left, and Taylor Schmidt, 21, both of Las Vegas, NV, are photographed on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. Owen and Schmidt both survived the mass shooting on Sunday's evening. Sometimes I think it happened then the next second I say did that really happend,' Owen said. 'I keep hearing the shots in my head, people running and hear the ambulances,' she added. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: Veteran Steve Charshafian, 59, speaks about Sunday's night mass shooting and recalls helping wounded people on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. Charshafian survived the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival shooting with his wife when they hid inside their car. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Aaron Stalker is interviewed outside Dance Dynamics on Wednesday October 04, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Stalker helped to evacuate and care for victims during Sunday night's mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest Festival. Aaron was attending a hockey game when his girlfriend, Stephanie Melanson called him from the concert. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS - OCTOBER 3: Jonathan Smith was shot at least twice while trying to run back and save others in the crowd at the Route 91 Harvest festival in Las Vegas. (Photo by Heather Long/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 03: Brian Hopkins, the lead singer of the band Elvis Monroe, is interviewed by a tv reported on the south end of the Las Vegas Strip on the on October 3, 2017, after the mass shooting that killed 59 people and inured more than 500 people at the Route 91 Harvest Festival near Mandalay Bay on October 1, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. Hopkins took over 20 people into a freezer near the venue. Hopkins filmed himself during the shooting, still unsure of what the chaos was going on outside in the venue. (Photo by Doug Kranz/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - OCTOBER 2: With the presence of her family, Danny Alegria, from left, Evan Algeria and Lucy Alegria - Carmen Alegria recounts her harrowing experience surviving and escaping the mass shooting that killed 59 and injured more than 525 at the Route 91 Harvest Festival, in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Oct. 2, 2017. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
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"At all relevant times, Defendants MGM, and/or Mandalay Corp ... knew or should have known that it was reasonably foreseeable that a breach of their duties to keep their premises reasonably safe in the aforementioned manner might result in catastrophic injury perpetrated by a gun-toting guest with an extreme intention to harm others," the complaint reads. 

Gasper is seeking an excess of $15,000 in damages. Her case is the first reported lawsuit against MGM and Mandalay Bay, but it likely won't be the last. 

It's extremely likely that victims of the shooting will try to hold the Mandalay Bay accountable by bringing lawsuits against the company, seeking damages for things like medical expenses or disabilities resulting from the shooting, say legal experts who spoke with Business Insider.

RELATED: Donald and Melania Trump visit Las Vegas following music festival

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Donald and Melania Trump visit Las Vegas following music festival shooting
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Donald and Melania Trump visit Las Vegas following music festival shooting
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump depart for travel to Las Vegas, in the aftermath of the shooting there, from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S. October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Air Force One departs Las Vegas past the broken windows on the Mandalay Bay hotel, where shooter Stephen Paddock conducted his mass shooting along the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department with first responders who reacted to the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017.
U.S. President Donald Trump, with first lady Melania Trump, greets trauma center staff at the University Medical Center after meeting with victims in the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump meet with police at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department in the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. Las Vegas Location REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump step from Air Force One as they arrive in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump is greeted by Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo as he arrives to meet with officials and first responders in the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. Las Vegas Location REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump, with first lady Melania Trump, arrives to talk to reporters with University Medical Center Trauma Center Medical Director Dr. John Fildes (L), after meeting with victims in the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump is greeted by survivor family members Shelby Stalker and Stephanie Melanson (L) after meeting with Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman (C) and police at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department in the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks next to first lady Melania Trump after meeting with police at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department in the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Air Force One departs Las Vegas past the broken windows on the Mandalay Bay hotel where shooter Stephen Paddock conducted his mass shooting along the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: President Donald Trump, joined by first lady Melania Trump and medical staff, speaks to reporters at University Medical Center, October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Trump is scheduled to visit with victims and first responders from Sunday night's mass shooting during his trip to Las Vegas. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: President Donald Trump and Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo greet a room full of police officers and first responders at Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department headquarters, October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Trump is scheduled to visit with victims and first responders from Sunday night's mass shooting during his trip to Las Vegas. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
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Whether such a lawsuit would have merit would depend on many factors that remain unknown to the public. For example, on Monday, the Los Angeles Times reported that a Mandalay Bay casino security guard alerted security of the gunman before Paddock opened fire on the crowd — something MGM says may not be accurate. 

"This remains an ongoing investigation with a lot of moving parts. As evidenced by law enforcement briefings over the past week, many facts are still unverified and continue to change as events are under review," MGM Resorts spokesperson, Debra DeShong, said in a statement. "We cannot be certain about the most recent timeline that has been communicated publicly, and we believe what is currently being expressed may not be accurate."

The company did not immediately respond to an email from Business Insider about Gasper's lawsuit. 

A lawsuit against MGM may require courts to break legal ground in terms of assigning liability for mass shootings that are becoming more common. As mass shootings become more and more common, premises may be seen as legally liable to take preventative measures. 

"If Congress isn't regulating gun ownership, it is going to be private parties ... who end up regulating their own premises," Heidi Li Feldman, a professor at Georgetown Law School, told Business Insider. 

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SEE ALSO: The hotel where the Las Vegas gunman stockpiled weapons for 3 days has been quiet about what happened — and legal experts say it could be in hot water

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