NYC subway riders trounce racist man on train

It was soup to nuts.

A subway bigot picked the wrong train to spout his hate, when a group of L train riders lectured the lout, splashed him with soup and tossed him off the train.

The Lime-A-Rita-swilling loser was caught on video Saturday yelling racist slurs and touting the First Amendment.

“I talk sh-- because I know I can! I’m a lawyer! I went to NYU Law! F--- you!” he says, before yelling out “Who cares?”

He then hops and dances and sings the N-word repeatedly. What he forgot is the Bill of Rights works both ways.

A crowd of straphangers then surrounds him, schools him and prevents him from getting to his bag.

The group shoves him out of the train when the doors open and then kicks him to keep him out.

As he attempts to get back into the car, a woman lobs a container of thick, orange Au Bon Pain soup at him.

“I don’t condone the violence, but by the same token, I’m not gonna lose sleep over what happened to this guy,” said Joshua Pyne, who took the video and posted it to his Facebook page.

“I think he deserved what he got.”

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A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he marches during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of a white supremacy group gives the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES) REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group shouts during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group stands behind a flag with a swastika during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of the Ku Klux Klan who says his name is Gary Munker poses for a photo during an interview with AFP in Hampton Bays, New York on November 22, 2016. Munker says his local branch of the KKK, which has recently placed recruitment flyers on car windshields on Long Island, has seen around 1,000 enquiries from people interested in joining since the election of Donald Trump. / AFP / William EDWARDS (Photo credit should read WILLIAM EDWARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of a white supremacy group give the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A supporter of the Ku Klux Klan is seen with his tattoos during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he listens to the crowd while carrying a Confederate flag during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan yells during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week.REUTERS/Chris Keane
Members of the Ku Klux Klan yell as they fly Confederate flags during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane? TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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