Firefighter fired for gifting watermelon to mostly black station

At least it matched his pink slip.

A 41-year-old probationary firefighter brought along a giant watermelon topped with a bow as he hoped to introduce himself to his peers at a Detroit firehouse.

Not to be confused with "Twilight" actor Robert Pattinson, Robert Pattison was apparently aware that 90 percent of the people at Engine 55 were black, FOX 2 reports.

"When you get your first detail at a firehouse, you pretty much know what you are getting yourself into," said Engine 55 firefighter Patrick Trout. "So you would have to say it was probably a bad call."

Regardless, Pattison claims the gesture was not a joke and that he didn't mean any offense, but he was still summarily dismissed.

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"There is zero tolerance for discriminatory behavior inside the Detroit Fire Department," said Fire Commissioner Eric Jones in a statement. "On Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017, at Engine 55, a trial firefighter engaged in unsatisfactory work behavior which was deemed offensive and racially insensitive to members of the Detroit Fire Department."

Some black firefighters were reportedly offended by Pattison's decision in light of the prevalent stereotype linking African-Americans with watermelons that dates back to the era of slavery in the United States.

Disagreeing with the action that was taken, Second Battallion Chief Shawn McCarty doesn’t think the Fenton, Mich., native should’ve lost his job over the watermelon.

Said McCarty, "Between what he did and losing his job, there were a few things that could have been done."

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