Casino mogul Steve Wynn says Las Vegas shooter would have triggered alarms at his hotels

Las Vegas casino mogul Steve Wynn identified Las Vegas as a target city nearly two years ago, and he told Fox News anchor Chris Wallace on Sunday that he increased spending on security at his hotels by “tens of millions of dollars” in attempt to “identify and preempt any kind of terroristic or violent threat.”

Wynn suggested that the training and steps implemented at his properties would have set off alarm bells if Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock had tried to launch his mass murder scheme from one of them.

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What we know about Las Vegas shooting suspect Stephen Paddock
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What we know about Las Vegas shooting suspect Stephen Paddock
Stephen Paddock, 64, allegedly opened fire from the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino on the Route 91 Harvest country music festival, leaving at least 59 people dead and hundreds injured.

(Social media/Handout via REUTERS)

He reportedly used a hammer-like tool to break out two windows at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.

(Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)

Stephen Paddock was reportedly a high-stakes gambler that lived in a retirement community in Mesquite, Nevada.

(REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus)

His father was Benjamin Hoskins Paddock, a bank robber and former FBI Most Wanted Fugitive.

(FBI/Handout via REUTERS)

Paddock killed himself before authorities breached his hotel room and investigators say he acted alone.

(REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus)

Paddock's girlfriend, Marilou Danley, was in the Philippines at the time of the shooting but he reportedly used her identification to check in at the Mandalay Bay hotel.

(Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department/Handout via REUTERS)

Stephen Paddock lived in this home in Melbourne, Florida from 2013 to 2015.

(Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)

Police said Paddock had no criminal record.

(Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)

NBC News reported that Paddock made several large gambling transactions in recent weeks, but that it wasn't clear if they were wins or losses.

(Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)

Paddock reportedly purchased firearms at  Guns & Guitars, a gun shop in Mesquite, Nevada. 

(Photo by Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images)

Paddock's brother, Eric, said his sibling belonged to no political or religious organizations, and had no history of mental illness.

 (Photo by Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Paddock's brother described him as a "wealthy guy" and said he liked to play video poker and go on cruises.

(Photo by Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images)

He worked as an accountant and had real estate investments, according to the Washington Post. 

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Paddock had his pilot license and owned at least one plane, according to Reuters.

(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)
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Specific training techniques include Wynn hotels housekeeping staffs, room service staffs and anybody else who enters a guest room doing visual inspections every time. He added that a room with a “Do Not Disturb” sign displayed on its door for longer than 12 hours is investigated.

“The scenario that we’re aware of would have indicated that [Paddock] didn’t let anyone in the room for two or three days,” Wynn told “Fox News Sunday.” “That would have triggered a whole bunch of alarms here.”

RELATED: Somber photos of Las Vegas emerge after the city cut its lights for 11 minutes

Wynn said guns are not allowed in his hotels, unless they belong to employees who are required to carry them. He said guests who are found to have guns, “we eject from the hotel.” Wynn said they discover guests with guns “continually.”

After the shooting, Wynn hotels started using wands to detect potential metal objects on guests, as well as inspecting luggage upon entrance to the hotel.

RELATED: The father of Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock was a “minister” — of a criminal nature

Paddock had been known to stay at Wynn resorts, among many others. Wallace asked Wynn if his security teams had much of a profile on him, and if anything should have raised a red flag.

“The most vanilla profile one could possibly imagine. A modest gambler, at least by our standards,” Wynn said.

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