Las Vegas gunman fired on security guard before mass shooting

Oct 9 (Reuters) - The Las Vegas gunman opened fire on a security guard six minutes before he rained down bullets on a crowd and killed 58 people, officials said on Monday in a change to the timeline of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

The shooter, Stephen Paddock, 64, was seen on numerous occasions in Las Vegas without any person accompanying him and he gambled the night before the shooting, Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said at a news conference. He killed himself after the attack.

"This individual purposely hid his actions leading up to this event, and it is difficult for us to find the answers," said Lombardo, who said he was frustrated with the speed of the investigation.

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What we know about Las Vegas shooting suspect Stephen Paddock
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What we know about Las Vegas shooting suspect Stephen Paddock
Stephen Paddock, 64, allegedly opened fire from the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino on the Route 91 Harvest country music festival, leaving at least 59 people dead and hundreds injured.

(Social media/Handout via REUTERS)

He reportedly used a hammer-like tool to break out two windows at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.

(Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)

Stephen Paddock was reportedly a high-stakes gambler that lived in a retirement community in Mesquite, Nevada.

(REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus)

His father was Benjamin Hoskins Paddock, a bank robber and former FBI Most Wanted Fugitive.

(FBI/Handout via REUTERS)

Paddock killed himself before authorities breached his hotel room and investigators say he acted alone.

(REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus)

Paddock's girlfriend, Marilou Danley, was in the Philippines at the time of the shooting but he reportedly used her identification to check in at the Mandalay Bay hotel.

(Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department/Handout via REUTERS)

Stephen Paddock lived in this home in Melbourne, Florida from 2013 to 2015.

(Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)

Police said Paddock had no criminal record.

(Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)

NBC News reported that Paddock made several large gambling transactions in recent weeks, but that it wasn't clear if they were wins or losses.

(Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)

Paddock reportedly purchased firearms at  Guns & Guitars, a gun shop in Mesquite, Nevada. 

(Photo by Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images)

Paddock's brother, Eric, said his sibling belonged to no political or religious organizations, and had no history of mental illness.

 (Photo by Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Paddock's brother described him as a "wealthy guy" and said he liked to play video poker and go on cruises.

(Photo by Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images)

He worked as an accountant and had real estate investments, according to the Washington Post. 

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Paddock had his pilot license and owned at least one plane, according to Reuters.

(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)
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Paddock sprayed an outdoor concert with bursts of gunfire from high above in a Las Vegas hotel window on Oct. 1, killing 58 and wounding hundreds more, before shooting himself.

"In coordination with the FBI’s behavioral analysis unit, a comprehensive picture is being drawn as to the suspect's mental state and currently we do not believe there is one particular event in the suspect's life for us to key on," Lombardo said.

There is no indication anyone other than Paddock fired on the crowd, Lombardo said, adding investigators are talking to family members and the girlfriend of the gunman.

Paddock shot and wounded a security guard who came to his floor at the Mandalay Bay hotel to investigate an open door down near Paddock's suite, Lombardo said, providing new details on what occurred immediately before the mass shooting.

The security guard, Jesus Campos, was struck in the leg as the gunman, from behind his door, shot into the hallway on the 32nd floor. Paddock apparently detected Campos via surveillance cameras he set up outside his hotel suite, police have said.

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Makeshift memorial in Las Vegas for victims of the Route 91 music festival shooting
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Makeshift memorial in Las Vegas for victims of the Route 91 music festival shooting
Bry Thompson wipes away tears at a makeshift memorial in the middle of Las Vegas Boulevard following the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
A woman leaves flowers at a makeshift memorial on the Las Vegas Strip for victims of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting next to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 3, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
People leave flowers at a makeshift memorial on the Las Vegas Strip for victims of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting next to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
A woman signs a memorial board on the Las Vegas Strip for victims of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting next to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 3, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Greg Arnerich of Mesa, Arizona (R) and Brandon Metzger of Temecula, California view a memorial near the sight of the mass shooting along the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
The Mandalay Bay hotel is shown through an American flag blowing in the wind at a memorial next to the mass shooting site along the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A sign is pictured at a makeshift memorial in the middle of Las Vegas Boulevard following the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
Friends stop and pause at a makeshift memorial in the middle of Las Vegas Boulevard following the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A woman leaves flowers at a makeshift memorial along Las Vegas Boulevard following a mass shooing in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 3, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
People gather at a makeshift memorial in the middle of Las Vegas Boulevard following the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Edith Garcia of Nevada wipes her eyes at a makeshift memoral set up along the Las Vegas Strip on October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The memorial made with candles, flowers and mementos is in response to last Sunday night's shooting when a lone gunman opened fire on the crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival killing at least 59 people and injuring more than 500. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Gloria Vitagliano of Nevada draws out the hashtag #VEGASSTRONG at a makeshift memoral set up along the Las Vegas Strip on October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The memorial made with candles, flowers and mementos is in response to last Sunday night's shooting when a lone gunman opened fire on the crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival killing at least 59 people and injuring more than 500. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: A memorial for the victims of Sunday's shooting is seen along the Las Vegas Strip on October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The makeshift memorial made with candles, flowers and mementos was created after a lone gunman opened fire on the crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival killing at least 59 people and injuring more than 500. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Mourners attend a memorial on Las Vegas Boulevard and Reno Avenue for the victims of the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. On October 1, 2017, lone gunman Stephan Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nevada opened fire on festival attendees leaving at least 59 dead and over 500 injured before killing himself. The investigation is ongoing. October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Mourners attend a memorial on Las Vegas Boulevard and Reno Avenue for the victims of the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. On October 1, 2017, lone gunman Stephan Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nevada opened fire on festival attendees leaving at least 59 dead and over 500 injured before killing himself. The investigation is ongoing. October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Mourners attend a memorial on Las Vegas Boulevard and Reno Avenue for the victims of the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. On October 1, 2017, lone gunman Stephan Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nevada opened fire on festival attendees leaving at least 59 dead and over 500 injured before killing himself. The investigation is ongoing. October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: A memorial on Las Vegas Boulevard and Reno Avenue for the victims of the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. On October 1, 2017, lone gunman Stephan Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nevada opened fire on festival attendees leaving at least 59 dead and over 500 injured before killing himself. The investigation is ongoing. October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Signs and candles are displayed at a makeshift memorial set up across from the Las Vegas Village on October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The spontaneous memorial located on the Las Vegas Strip was implemented in response to Sunday night's shooting on October 3, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Late Sunday night, a lone gunman killed at least 59 people and injured more than 500 after he opened fire on a large crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: A memorial on Las Vegas Boulevard and Reno Avenue for the victims of the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. On October 1, 2017, lone gunman Stephan Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nevada opened fire on festival attendees leaving at least 59 dead and over 500 injured before killing himself. The investigation is ongoing. October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
People comfort each other at a makeshift memorial outside the Route 91 music festival site in Las Vegas, Nevada on October 4, 2017, beside the Mandalay Hotel after a gunman fired from and killed 59 people and wounded more than 500 others when he opened fire from the hotel on a country music festival . Police said the gunman, a 64-year-old local resident named as Stephen Paddock, had been killed after a SWAT team responded to reports of multiple gunfire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay, a hotel-casino next to the concert venue. / AFP PHOTO / Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: Flowers, cards and candles begin to fill the median Wednesday morning as a memorial for the victims of the mass shooting near the crime scene off Las Vegas Boulevard on October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
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Paddock shot the guard at 9:59 p.m. local time, Lombardo said, shortly before raining down bullets on the Route 91 Harvest festival in an attack that began at 10:05 p.m. and lasted 10 minutes.

Police officers found Campos when they arrived on the floor.

Paddock had a document in the room with him that contained numbers, Lombardo said, adding he could not immediately say what purpose the figures served.

Las Vegas police officer David Newton told CBS News program "60 Minutes" on Sunday that he entered the room and saw a note on the shooter's nightstand with numbers that appeared to be designed to help his aim.

It was unclear why Paddock stopped firing at the crowd, suggesting he may have initially planned to escape, Lombardo said.

He shot at jet fuel tanks at McCarran International Airport and had protective gear in the hotel suite and explosives in his parked car, Lombardo said.

(Reporting by Alex Dobuzinskis in Los Angeles; Additional reporting by Jonathan Allen and Joseph Ax in New York and Bernie Woodall in Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Editing by Lisa Shumaker and Jonathan Oatis)

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