Illinois man arrives in Las Vegas with crosses to honor victims

A man drove nearly 2,000 miles cross-country to deliver dozens of white crosses to the iconic "Welcome to Las Vegas" sign on the famous city's strip to honor victims of last weekend's massacre.

Greg Zanis, a carpenter from Illinois that has become well known for honoring victims of mass shooting around the country, made 58 crosses from scratch to install in a patch of grass not far from the area where Route 91 Harvest country music festival was held and 58 victims lost their lives.

RELATED: Mourners gather around crosses at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign

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Man arrives in Las Vegas delivers hand-made crosses to honor mass shooting victims
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Man arrives in Las Vegas delivers hand-made crosses to honor mass shooting victims
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: U.S. Army veteran Adam Arizaga of Las Vegas, Nevada, places flowers on a cross at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign on October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. 58 crosses made by Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, are at the location to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: U.S. Army veteran Adam Arizaga of Las Vegas, Nevada, places flowers on a cross at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign. 58 crosses made by Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, are at the location to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
Greg Zanis of Chicago, Illinois works on one of the 58 white crosses he set up for the victims of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
Greg Zanis of Chicago, Illinois works on one of the 58 white crosses he set up for the victims of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Mourners gather at the 'Welcome to Las Vegas' sign where Greg Zanis, a retired carpenter from Chicago, Illinois, placed 58 crosses to honor those who were killed during the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd killing at least 58 people and injuring more than 450. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
Greg Zanis of Chicago, Illinois works on one of the 58 white crosses he set up for the victims of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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“This row of crosses will show the severity of what really happened there. More so than numbers and pictures in the paper,”  Zanis told  WGN News before he left.

Each of the crosses, which took Zanis two days to cut and decorate, has a heart attached and features names and photos of the victims. The 66-year-old also brought Stars of David for Jewish victims.

SEE ALSO: Man shares heart-wrenching story of dad who ran off plane after learning son died in Vegas shooting

Over the past twenty years, Zanis said he's erected more than 20,000 markers for victims of mass shootings, including after the Pulse Nightclub massacre in 2016 and the Sandy Hook school shooting in 2015.

The retiree plans to keep the tribute up for 40 days before delivering them to the victims' families.

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