A huge solar storm is coming and could cost $20 trillion in damage

Solar storms are known to disrupt satellite and radio communications, but scientists now say that one extreme space weather event could cause “doomsday” on Earth.

Researchers from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics say that a large space weather event could even occur in the next 10 years. 

The event could cause global technological damage costing $10 trillion dollars. 

See some of the wildest solar flares captured

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Solar flares (the sun)
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Solar flares (the sun)
The sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 7:28 p.m. EST on Dec. 19, 2014. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. (Photo via NASA/SDO)

On Feb. 24, 2014, the sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 7:49 p.m. EST. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), which keeps a constant watch on the sun, captured images of the event. These SDO images from 7:25 p.m. EST on Feb. 24 show the first moments of this X-class flare in different wavelengths of light -- seen as the bright spot that appears on the left limb of the sun. Hot solar material can be seen hovering above the active region in the sun's atmosphere, the corona.

Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation, appearing as giant flashes of light in the SDO images. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel. (Photo via NASA/SDO)

The bright flash of an X1.6-class flare can be seen on the right side of the sun in this image captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. This image shows extreme ultraviolet light of 131 Angstroms, which highlights the intensely hot material of a flare and which is typically colorized in teal. (Photo via NASA/SDO)
On Oct. 25, 2014, the sun emitted its fifth substantial flare since Oct.19. This flare was classified as an X1-class flare and it peaked at 1:08 p.m. EDT, as seen as a bright flash of light in this image from NASA's SDO. The image shows extreme ultraviolet light in the 131-angstrom wavelength, which highlights the intensely hot material in a flare and which is typically colorized in teal. (Photo via NASA/SDO)
NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of an X2.0-class solar flare bursting off the lower right side of the sun on Oct. 27, 2014. The image shows a blend of extreme ultraviolet light with wavelengths of 131 and 171 Angstroms. (Photo via NASA/SDO)

The bright flash of an M-class flare is seen exploding on the left side of the sun in this image from Nov. 5, 2014. The image was captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory in extreme ultraviolet light that was colorized in red and gold. (Photo via NASA/SDO)

On Jan. 27, 2012, a large X-class flare erupted from an active region near the solar west limb. X-class flares are the most powerful of all solar events. Seen here is an image of the flare captured by the X-ray telescope on Hinode. This image shows an emission from plasma heated to greater than eight million degrees during the energy release process of the flare. (Photo via JAXA/Hinode)
IN SPACE - JANUARY 23: In this handout from the NOAA/National Weather Service's Space Weather Prediction Center, shows the coronal mass ejection (CME) erupting from the sun late January 23, 2012. The flare is reportedly the largest since 2005 and is expected to affect GPS systems and other communications when it reaches the Earth's magnetic field in the morning of January 24. (Photo by NOAA/National Weather Service's Space Weather Prediction Center via Getty Images)
IN SPACE - JANUARY 23: In this handout from the NOAA/National Weather Service's Space Weather Prediction Center, shows a solar flare erupting from the sun late January 23, 2012. The flare is reportedly the largest since 2005 and is expected to affect GPS systems and other communications when it reaches the Earth's magnetic field in the morning of January 24. (Photo by NOAA/National Weather Service's Space Weather Prediction Center via Getty Images)
The sun erupted with one of the largest solar flares of this solar cycle on March 6, 2012 at 7PM ET. ?This flare was categorized as an X5.4, making it the second largest flare -- after an X6.9 on August 9, 2011 -- since the sun's activity segued into a period of relatively low activity called solar minimum in early 2007. The current increase in the number of X-class flares is part of the sun's normal 11-year solar cycle, during which activity on the sun ramps up to solar maximum, which is expected to peak in late 2013. (Photo by NASA/SDO/AIA/Handout/Corbis via Getty Images)
ABERDEEN, UNITED KINGDOM - NOVEMBER 27: EXCLUSIVE. Northern Lights near Torphins at 00.34Hrs on November 27, 2003 in Aberdeen, Scotland. The purple and green rays appear to flare as well as move rapidly sideways. Dancing across the skies these images Britain's most spectacular psychedelic light shows over the past 20 years. Over the last two decades photographer, Jim Henderson, 62, has witnessed 350 aurora displays in the UK, and has only ever had to travel more than a few miles from his cottage 25 miles west of Aberdeen to capture his amazing images. Dedicated Jim has collected an archive of over 5000 images in the 22 years he has been painstakingly recording auroras. Most people think to truly witness the magnificence of the aurora borealis - or northern lights as they are commonly known- they need to travel thousands of miles to the freezing Icelandic tundra or remote Canadian mountains. And last weekend's lack of any aurora appearance - despite widespread reports that one was imminent - will have done nothing to quash this view. But as these pictures prove the incredible sight can be just as visible in the familiar British countryside as the frozen landscape of the Arctic circle. (Photo by Jim Henderson / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
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The scientists told Gizmodo that, within 150 years, the same event could cost $20 trillion dollars. 

This is because, as our technology development advances, we will actually become more susceptible to these types of space weather events. 

In 1859, a massive geomagnetic superstorm, known as the Carrington event, hit Earth and disrupted radio communication on the ground. 

Scientists are now proposing a “magnetic deflector” to block harmful blasts from the sun.

This would cost around $100 billion dollars to create, but that's way less than the damage costs we may incur without it. 

RELATED: The best photos from the Total Solar Eclipse 

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The best photos from the Total Solar Eclipse
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The best photos from the Total Solar Eclipse
As millions of people across the United States experienced a total eclipse as the umbra, or moon’s shadow passed over them, only six people witnessed the umbra from space. Viewing the eclipse from orbit were NASA’s Randy Bresnik, Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, ESA (European Space Agency’s) Paolo Nespoli, and Roscosmos’ Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy. The space station crossed the path of the eclipse three times as it orbited above the continental United States at an altitude of 250 miles.
The solar eclipse creates the effect of a diamond ring at totality as seen from Clingmans Dome, which at 6,643 feet (2,025m) is the highest point in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 35�33'24" N, 83�29'46" W. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
The Saint-They Chapel is seen in silhouette at sunset during a partial solar eclipse, as the moon passes in front of the sun, seen at the Pointe du Van, in Brittany, France, August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Mal Langsdon TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Enthusiasts Tanner Person (R) and Josh Blink, both from Vacaville, California, watch a total solar eclipse while standing atop Carroll Rim Trail at Painted Hills, a unit of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, near Mitchell, Oregon, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image is near 44�39'117'' N 120�6'042'' W. REUTERS/Adrees Latif TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A combination of ten pictures shows the progression of a partial solar eclipse near as a jet plane flies by the total solar eclipse in Guernsey, Wyoming U.S., August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
The Anjo Moroni statue atop the church of the Mormons is photographed while the solar eclipse is seen in Manaus, Brazil, August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly
A partial eclipse of the sun, as it sets, is cast on a traffic guide post through the lens of a binoculars at the "Puerto del Viento" mountain pass in Ronda, southern Spain, August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jon Nazca
A multiple exposure image shows the solar eclipse as it creates the effect of a diamond ring at totality as seen from Clingmans Dome, which at 6,643 feet (2,025m) is the highest point in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 35�33'24" N, 83�29'46" W. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A total solar eclipse is photographed from atop Carroll Rim Trail at Painted Hills, a unit of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, near Mitchell, Oregon, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image is near 44�39'117'' N 120�6'042'' W. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
JEFFERSON CITY, MO - AUGUST 21: The moon begins to obscure the sun durin the4 start of the Solar Eclipse Over The United States on August 21, 2017 in Jefferson City, Missouri. (Photo by Brian Killian/WireImage)
A composite image of eight pictures shows the phases of the total eclipse as the moon passes from left to right in front of the sun during a solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, near Perryville, Mo. Shot with an equivalent of an 800mm lens, the partial phases are single exposures. The center image of the total eclipse is made from multiple exposures that help show more detail of the sun's corona around the moon. (Chris Lee/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images)
The total solar eclipse Monday August 21, 2017 in Madras, Oregon. Emotional sky-gazers stood transfixed across North America Monday as the Sun vanished behind the Moon in a rare total eclipse that swept the continent coast-to-coast for the first time in nearly a century. / AFP PHOTO / ROB KERR (Photo credit should read ROB KERR/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 21: The solar eclipse is seen behind the Statue of Liberty at Liberty Island on August 21, 2017 in New York City. While New York was not in the path of totality for the solar eclipse, around 72 percent of the sun was covered by the moon during the peak time of the partial eclipse. (Photo by Noam Galai/WireImage)
CALIFORNIA, USA - AUGUST 21: Total solar eclipse is seen in California, United States on August 21, 2017. (Photo by Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 21: (EDITORS NOTE: This image has been converted to black and white.) A lens flare during the Solar eclipse over the United States as seen from the National Mall on August 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/WireImage)
2017 Solar Eclipse totality as seen by the people attending the viewing event at the Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem, Oregon.
Employees and visitors at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory stopped to watch the 2017 solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017.
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