Someone dressed as the Monopoly mascot and photobombed the Equifax senate hearing

Equifax's former CEO Richard Smith is currently testifying before the Senate Finance Committee about the company's massive data breach... but it's kind of hard to concentrate on him when someone is photobombing him while dressed like the Monopoly mascot.

2017, everyone.

SEE ALSO: Turns out the Equifax hack was even more gigantic than we thought

At the Equifax hearing on Wednesday, while discussing the breach that leaked personal information of more than 140 million people, Smith was overshadowed by someone who appeared to be dressed as Rich Uncle Pennybags, visibly photobombing the live stream of Smith's testimony.

The person appeared to be in full IDGAF trolling mode — dressed in a top hat and red bow tie, compete with a thick white mustache and freaking monocle. And though many were eager to hear Smith's testimony — anticipating he would accept "full responsibility" as he told the House Energy and Commerce Committee on Tuesday — the Monopoly mascot may have stolen the spotlight.

While his presence was a bit confusing to those watching at home, Amanda Werner — a campaign manager for Public Citizen — tweeted an explanation. "The Monopoly Man is here to raise attention to Equifax's get-out-of-jail-free card, forced arb," she wrote, sharing a photo of Pennybags.

Werner also shared a link to a release titled "Forced Arbitration Is a 'Get-Out-of-Jail-Free' Card for Banks That Cheat Customers," and a video of the activist dressed as the Monopoly Man explaining the reasoning behind the costume.

"This is a jail free card, it has Equifax and Wells Fargo's logos on it," the activist said, holding up a mock card. "It basically explains that forced arbitration allows companies to break the law and not have any consequences because consumers can't actually go to court."

RELATED: Equifax CEO Richard Smith

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UNITED STATES - MARCH 15: Equifax CEO Richard F. Smith speaks with Bloomberg News reporters on Thursday, March 15, 2007, in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Noah Berger/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Close-up of the upper corner of a consumer credit report from the credit bureau Equifax, with text reading Credit File and Personal Identification, on a light wooden surface, September 11, 2017. In September of 2017, a data breach at Equifax exposed the personal information of thousands of customers. (Photo via Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images).
Sign with logo and a portion of the main building are visible at the headquarters of credit bureau Equifax in downtown Atlanta, Georgia, September 20, 2017. In September of 2017, a data breach at Equifax exposed the personal information of thousands of customers. (Photo via Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)
A monitor displays Equifax Inc. signage on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. Rediscovering their love for U.S. stock funds, investors added the most money since June�during the past week,�as the Trump administration plotted strategy for pushing a tax overhaul and the S&P 500 rose to a record. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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In the release on Public Citizen's website, President Robert Weissman elaborated further on the issue. "Forced arbitration gives companies like Wells Fargo and Equifax a monopoly over our system of justice by blocking consumers' access to the courts."

"The CRA resolution striking down the arbitration rule is a virtual get-out-of-jail-free card for companies engaged in financial scams. It should not pass go," he said.

Will Pennybags be able to successfully deliver the card to Smith? Stay tuned.

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