After Vegas Massacre, how to increase your odds of survival if a gunman opens fire into open area

If gunshots erupted during an outdoor concert or festival, would you know what to do to get out alive?

Security Expert Steve Kardian gave Inside Edition tips on what to do should you find yourself in a situation like what happened in Las Vegas Sunday night at the Route 91 Harvest festival.

Read: Guests Next Door to Las Vegas Gunman Stephen Paddock Recall Hiding in Bushes for 3 Hours

"Visualize, mentally prepare," Kardian said. "'What would I do if? What would the crisis be?’ Think about it. Look for the exits. Think about what you are going to do if it happens, fold it up and put it in your back pocket and enjoy yourself."

Many fans at the Vegas music festival believed the initial gunshots were fireworks. Kardian says it's important to never assume that it is.

"Start moving, don’t wait," he said. "Every second you wait, that is additional shots that are fired, those are additional injuries and people that could be killed. Start moving right away. Start moving to the outskirts. Don’t run to the masses and don’t run where everyone else is running."

Here are the deadliest mass shootings in the U.S.: 

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The deadliest mass shootings in the US since 1900
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The deadliest mass shootings in the US since 1900

On October 1, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada, gunman Stephen Paddock opened fire on concertgoers below from the windows of his suite at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. 

As of October 3, at least 59 people are dead and over 500 injured in what became the deadliest mass shooting in United States history. 

(Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)

Five Dallas police officers were shot and killed by Micah Xavier Johnson, 25, as they guarded a group of protesters on July 7, 2016.

(Photo via REUTERS/Carlo Allegri)

On June 12, 2016, Omar Mateen opened fire inside Pulse Nightclub, a well-known LGBT club in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and injuring 58. 

REUTERS/Carlo Allegri/File Photo

Chris Harper-Mercer, 26, opened fire on the Umpqua Community College campus in Roseburg, Oregon, killing nine people and wounding nine others before he was shot dead by police on October 1, 2015.

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

White supremacist Dylann Roof, 21, opened fire at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, during a bible study, leaving nine churchgoers dead on June 18, 2015. 

(REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

Rival motorcycle gangs killed nine at a restaurant in Waco, Texas, on May 18, 2015. More than 190 people are arrested. 

(REUTERS/Waco Police Department/Handout)

Fourteen people were killed and 22 were wounded when married couple Syed Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik attacked a service center for people with developmental disabilities during its holiday party in San Bernadino, California, on Dec. 2, 2015.

(Photo by Barbara Davidson/The Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

A college student killed six people, three in his apartment and others on the streets of Isla Vista, California, on May 23, 2014. The mentally ill gunman committed suicide.

(Photo by Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

A former Navy reservist working as a government contractor killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard on Sept. 16, 2013. He was shot dead by police.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

On December 14, 2012, Adam Lanza attacked Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, killing 20 children and six school staff members.

(Photo by James Keivom/NY Daily News via Getty Images)

A masked gunman killed 12 people and wounded 70 when he opened fire on July 20, 2012, at a midnight premiere of the Batman film "The Dark Knight Rises" in Aurora, Denver.

(REUTERS/Evan Semon)

A white supremacist opened fire in the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, on August 6, 2012, killing six people. 

(REUTERS/John Gress)

Then-U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) was the target of an assassination attempt by a gunman in Tucson, Arizona, on Jan. 8, 2011. More than a dozen other people were injured and six people were killed at a public event entitled 'Congress on Your Corner' when a gunman opened fire.

(Photo by James Palka/Getty Images)

U.S. Army Major Nidal Malik Hasan, an army psychiatrist, killed 13 people and wounded 30 in a shooting at Fort Hood military base on November 5, 2009.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

On April 3, 2009, 41-year-old Jiverly Antares Wong killed 13 people inside an immigration center in Binghamton, New York.

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

On April 16, 2007, gunman Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 people on the campus of Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. 

(Photo by Ted Richardson/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT via Getty Images)

A gunman killed five girls in a one-room Amish schoolhouse October 2, 2006, in Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania. The man entered the school, let the boys go free, tied up the girls and shot them execution-style before killing himself.

(Photo by William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)

Two men, John Allen Muhammad, 41, and Lee Boyd Malvo, 17, ambushed 13 people, killing 10 of them, in sniper-style shootings that terrorized the Washington D.C. area for three weeks in October 2002. Muhammad was executed and Malvo was sentenced to life in prison. 

(Photo credit should read LUKE FRAZZA/AFP/Getty Images)

The Columbine High School massacre was perpetrated by students Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold who killed 12 fellow students and one teacher on April 20, 1999.

(Photo via REUTERS/Gary Caskey GCC/HB)

George Hennard killed 23 people and injured 27 others when he attacked Luby's Cafeteria in Killeen, Texas, on October 16, 1991. 

(Photo by Gaylon Wampler/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)

James Huberty, pictured here, shot and killed 21 people and hurt 19 others at a McDonald's restaurant in San Ysidro, California, on July 18, 1984. 

(Photo via Getty Images)

Student Charles Whitman climbed to the top of the clock tower at the University of Texas where he shot and killed 13 people after killing his mother and wife on August 1, 1966. 

(Photo via Getty Images)

The Ludlow massacre took place when members of the Colorado National Guard as well as other militiamen shot down 19 striking coal miners in 1914. 

(Photo via the Denver Post via Getty Images)

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He advises hiding behind trees, monuments and statues, anywhere that can shield you from gunfire for a brief time. 

He also added to listen for a pause “that could be a sign that the shooter is reloading.”

Kardian said that during that eerie silence, you can get 40-50 feet, which is “the difference between living or dying.”

At the pulse nightclub massacre in Orlando last year, 49 people were killed in a tight compact space. In the case of the Vegas shooting, the gunman had a wide field of fire.

Read: Vegas Gunman Stephen Paddock's Family 'Dumbfounded' After Massacre

Shooter Stephen Paddock was on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel and the music festival stretched more than 15 acres on the ground below.

Here's what we know about Stephen Paddock: 

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What we know about Las Vegas shooting suspect Stephen Paddock
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What we know about Las Vegas shooting suspect Stephen Paddock
Stephen Paddock, 64, allegedly opened fire from the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino on the Route 91 Harvest country music festival, leaving at least 59 people dead and hundreds injured.

(Social media/Handout via REUTERS)

He reportedly used a hammer-like tool to break out two windows at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.

(Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)

Stephen Paddock was reportedly a high-stakes gambler that lived in a retirement community in Mesquite, Nevada.

(REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus)

His father was Benjamin Hoskins Paddock, a bank robber and former FBI Most Wanted Fugitive.

(FBI/Handout via REUTERS)

Paddock killed himself before authorities breached his hotel room and investigators say he acted alone.

(REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus)

Paddock's girlfriend, Marilou Danley, was in the Philippines at the time of the shooting but he reportedly used her identification to check in at the Mandalay Bay hotel.

(Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department/Handout via REUTERS)

Stephen Paddock lived in this home in Melbourne, Florida from 2013 to 2015.

(Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)

Police said Paddock had no criminal record.

(Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)

NBC News reported that Paddock made several large gambling transactions in recent weeks, but that it wasn't clear if they were wins or losses.

(Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)

Paddock reportedly purchased firearms at  Guns & Guitars, a gun shop in Mesquite, Nevada. 

(Photo by Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images)

Paddock's brother, Eric, said his sibling belonged to no political or religious organizations, and had no history of mental illness.

 (Photo by Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Paddock's brother described him as a "wealthy guy" and said he liked to play video poker and go on cruises.

(Photo by Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images)

He worked as an accountant and had real estate investments, according to the Washington Post. 

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Paddock had his pilot license and owned at least one plane, according to Reuters.

(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)
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From his vantage point it was “like shooting fish in a barrel,” Kardian said, adding, "It was very easy for him to spray that weapon. That is why it is important that you break up. The bigger groups, the larger targets are what he is going to be shooting for.” 

Kardian says all that heavy firepower possessed by the Vegas shooter turned out to be his downfall.

"The guns he was using and the amount of ammunition, it was burning gunfire so, in essence, it is creating a fire and set off the fire alarm that alerted police officers to his exact room," Kardian said. 

Watch: Hundreds Donate Blood in the Wake Las Vegas' Mass Shooting: 'I Wanted to Do Something Right Now'

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