LA's palm trees are disappearing and they likely won't be replaced

If there’s one thing that defines the sunny paradise of Southern California, it’s palm trees swinging in the breeze.

But this wont be the case for long. According to the LA Times, palm trees in Los Angeles are dying off.

The cause? A tag-team effort from a destructive beetle known as the South American palm weevil and a fungus called Fusarium

The worrying thing is, officials don’t know exactly how many trees have been lost.

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Palm trees in Los Angeles
An exterior view of palm trees surrounding the Beverly Hills Hotel sign on Sunset Boulevard in September 1995 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Ron Eisenbeg/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
A man rides a bicycle under the Venice sign on Windward Avenue in Venice, California November 7, 2014. Venice Beach, one of the few spots in car-choked Los Angeles with a vibrant street life, has been a cultural melting pot for more than half a century, welcoming everyone from hippies and homeless wanderers to the latest generation of tech executives. The neighborhood known for its palm trees and cool Pacific breezes has been on a winning streak in recent years, transforming from the "Slum by the Sea" into "Silicon Beach", thanks to the digital giants who have set up shop. REUTERS/Jonathan Alcorn (UNITED STATES - Tags: TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SOCIETY TRANSPORT TRAVEL)
LOS ANGELES - SEPTEMBER 10: Palm trees downtown in Los Angeles, California on September 10, 2017. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES - SEPTEMBER 11: A group of palm trees sits outside the Los Angeles Convention Center in Los Angeles, California on September 11, 2017. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images)
Palm trees stand on South Berendo Street in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Tuesday, July 14, 2015. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The afternoon sun is seen over a row of palm trees in Arcadia, California on June 5 2017. Despite the diverse and ubiquitous number of palm trees in the Los Angeles area, only one species, the California fan palm, is native to California, all others were imported and mostly planted in the early 20th century, from the slender Mexican fan palms to the Canary Island date palm with its feather top, soon outnumbering the native plant. / AFP PHOTO / FREDERIC J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
Palm trees stand on South Berendo Street in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Tuesday, July 14, 2015. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Palm trees stand next to a public art installation along the median on Santa Monica Boulevard in West Hollywood, California, U.S., on Tuesday, July 14, 2015. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 9: Sunset boulevard flanked by palm trees, Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, California, United States of America. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
People walk near a puddle reflecting palm trees at the boardwalk in Venice, California November 7, 2014. Venice Beach, one of the few spots in car-choked Los Angeles with a vibrant street life, has been a cultural melting pot for more than half a century, welcoming everyone from hippies and homeless wanderers to the latest generation of tech executives. The neighborhood known for its palm trees and cool Pacific breezes has been on a winning streak in recent years, transforming from the "Slum by the Sea" into "Silicon Beach", thanks to the digital giants who have set up shop. REUTERS/Jonathan Alcorn (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRAVEL SOCIETY)
People stand amid palm trees on the beach in Venice, California November 7, 2014. Venice Beach, one of the few spots in car-choked Los Angeles with a vibrant street life, has been a cultural melting pot for more than half a century, welcoming everyone from hippies and homeless wanderers to the latest generation of tech executives. The neighborhood known for its palm trees and cool Pacific breezes has been on a winning streak in recent years, transforming from the "Slum by the Sea" into "Silicon Beach", thanks to the digital giants who have set up shop. REUTERS/Jonathan Alcorn (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRAVEL SOCIETY)
People walk on the Venice boardwalk, a popular tourist destination in Venice, California November 7, 2014. Venice Beach, one of the few spots in car-choked Los Angeles with a vibrant street life, has been a cultural melting pot for more than half a century, welcoming everyone from hippies and homeless wanderers to the latest generation of tech executives. The neighborhood known for its palm trees and cool Pacific breezes has been on a winning streak in recent years, transforming from the "Slum by the Sea" into "Silicon Beach", thanks to the digital giants who have set up shop. REUTERS/Jonathan Alcorn (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRAVEL SOCIETY)
Palm trees stand as a container ship passes at the Port of Los Angeles in San Pedro, California, U.S., on Tuesday, April 8, 2014. Wholesale trade rose 0.7% in February to $436.1 billion, up 3.1% compared with February 2013, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images
LOS ANGELES - 2012: A view of palm trees from the street in 2012 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Stephen Albanese/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES - 2012: A puddle in a pothole with palm trees reflected in it in 2012 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Stephen Albanese/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
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But when they’re gone, that’s it. Authorities have no plans to replace them. 

Los Angeles is facing increasing heatwaves as the years go by. Palm trees aren’t the most practical choice for these conditions.

They’ll be swapped out for trees that provide more shade and use less water.

According to the LA Times, the palms won’t disappear completely. The city has chosen six iconic areas where it will continue to maintain the trees.

Palms have a long history in LA, believed to have first been brought by 18th century franciscan missionaries.

But times might be changing. David Dink, policy director of non-profit Climate Resolve said, to The Guardian: “We’re now in a period where we have a better understanding of what’s needed.”

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