Mother accused of providing heroin to addicted 16-year-old daughter

LONDONDERRY TOWNSHIP, Dauphin County (WPMT) — A Dauphin County woman is facing several charges after allegedly providing more heroin to her heroin-addicted 16-year-old daughter, according to a criminal complaint.

Diane Lorraine Gutierrez, 40, of Londonderry Township, is charged with drug possession, endangering the welfare of a child, and recklessly endangering another person, according to police.

The girl suffered an overdose in July while doing drugs with Gutierrez. It required several doses of Narcan to revive the girl, the criminal complaint says.

The alleged crimes began in March, when Gutierrez sent the girl to live with a relative in Elizabethtown, Lancaster County. Gutierrez suspected her daughter was using heroin, the criminal complaint states. She allegedly spoke to the relative, who confirmed that she was providing heroin to the girl to prevent her from being “sick,” the complaint states.

Gutierrez did not remove the girl from the living arrangement, in spite of the fact that she knew the girl was being provided heroin, the complaint says. Instead, they continued to live with the relative until July.

During that time, the relative would transport the girl to visit Gutierrez in her Londonderry Township home. Gutierrez and her daughter allegedly used heroin together on these visits, the criminal complaint says. At times, Gutierrez would provide the heroin, but her daughter often had drugs of her own, according to the criminal complaint.

On July 1, Gutierrez and her daughter allegedly used heroin together, and the girl suffered an overdose. Emergency medical personnel were called and revived the girl, according to the criminal complaint. The girl was taken to the hospital for treatment.

Gutierrez was charged on September 22. The criminal complaint does not indicate whether the relative is also being charged.

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Jennifer Stepp (L) and her daughter Audrey, 8, teach a Naloxone training class for children and adults on how to save lives by injecting Naloxone into people suffering opioid overdoses at the Hillview Community Center in Louisville, Kentucky, November 21, 2015. REUTERS/John Sommers II
A Naloxone Rescue Kit is pictured at the home of Jennifer Stepp in Sherpherdsville, Kentucky, November 18, 2015. Jennifer is teaching her daughter Audrey how to inject Naloxone using this kit with a preloaded syringe similar to an Epi-pen, along with a regular syringe and a nasal injection method. REUTERS/John Sommers II
Jennifer Stepp (L) and her daughter Audrey, 8, teach a Naloxone training class for children and adults on how to save lives by injecting Naloxone into people suffering opioid overdoses at the Hillview Community Center in Louisville, Kentucky, November 21, 2015. REUTERS/John Sommers II
Audrey Stepp, 8, practices injecting a heroin antidote, naloxone, into her stuffed lamb Bill, at home in Sherpherdsville, Kentucky, November 18, 2015. Audrey is being trained how to inject Naloxone using a kit with a preloaded syringe similar to an Epi-pen, along with a regular syringe and a nasal injection method. REUTERS/John Sommers II
A vial of Naloxone and syringe are pictured at a Naloxone training class taught by Jennifer Stepp and her daughter Audrey for adults and children to learn how to save lives by injecting Naloxone into people suffering opioid overdoses at the Hillview Community Center in Louisville, Kentucky, November 21, 2015. REUTERS/John Sommers II
Jennifer Stepp and her daughter Audrey Stepp, 8, hand out trainer boxes of Evzio, a Naloxone auto-injector that helps with opioid overdoses after a Naloxone training class for children and adults to learn how to inject Naloxone into people that overdose on opioids in Louisville, Kentucky, November 21, 2015. REUTERS/John Sommers II
Audrey Stepp, 8, measures out Naloxone as she practices injecting a heroin antidote into an orange and her stuffed lamb Bill, with her mother Jennifer Stepp at their home in Sherpherdsville, Kentucky, November 18, 2015. Audrey is being trained how to inject Naloxone using a kit with a preloaded syringe similar to an Epi-pen, along with a regular syringe and a nasal injection method. REUTERS/John Sommers II
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