Trump attacks John McCain for coming out against the Graham-Cassidy health care bill

President Donald Trump on Monday night tweeted what amounted to a political-opposition video targeting Sen. John McCain over his position on the latest Republican healthcare bill.

The six-minute video shows various archive clips of McCain criticizing Obamacare and echoing calls to repeal and replace the law formally known as the Affordable Care Act. "A few of the many clips of John McCain talking about Repealing & Replacing O'Care. My oh my has he changed-complete turn from years of talk," Trump wrote.

Trump sent that tweet as Sens. Lindsey Graham and Bob Cassidy, the authors of the latest Republican attempt at repealing Obamacare known as the Graham-Cassidy bill, were debating the issue on CNN Monday night.

When he was informed of the president's tweet, Graham responded: "John McCain was willing to die for this country. So I would say to any American who has a problem with John McCain's vote that John McCain can do whatever damn he wants to. He's earned that right."

Watch the moment below:

McCain, who is battling an aggressive form of brain cancer, said last week that he would not vote for the Graham-Cassidy bill. The bill's future was in doubt on Monday after Maine Sen. Susan Collins said she would vote against the bill, making her the third Republican to publicly come out against it.

Collins' opposition would effectively tank Graham-Cassidy, which could only afford to lose two votes to pass.

RELATED: McCain votes no on Obamacare 'skinny' repeal

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McCain votes no on Obamacare 'skinny' repeal
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McCain votes no on Obamacare 'skinny' repeal
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 27: Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) holds a news conference with fellow GOP senators to say they would not support a 'Skinny Repeal' of health care at the U.S. Capitol July 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. The Republican senators said they would not support any legislation to repeal and replace Obamacare unless it was guaranteed to go to conference with the House of Representatives. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 27: (L-R) Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) and Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) hold a news conference to say they would not support a 'Skinny Repeal' of health care at the U.S. Capitol July 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. The Republican senators said they would not support any legislation to repeal and replace Obamacare unless it was guaranteed to go to conference with the House of Representatives. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Senator John McCain (R-AZ) speaks with reporters after voting against the "skinny repeal" health care bill on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., July 28, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 27: Sen John McCain (R-AZ) leaves the Senate Chamber after a vote on a stripped-down, or 'Skinny Repeal,' version of Obamacare reform on July 28, 2017 in Washington, DC. McCain was one of three Republican Senators to vote against the measure. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
Senator John McCain (R-AZ) speaks during a press conference about his resistance to the so-called "Skinny Repeal" of the Affordable Care Act on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., July 27, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 28: Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) leaves the the Senate chamber at the U.S. Capitol after voting on the GOP 'Skinny Repeal' health care bill on July 28, 2017 in Washington, DC. Three Senate Republicans voted no to block a stripped-down, or 'Skinny Repeal,' version of Obamacare reform. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
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