White German woman tells ‘Maury’ of her 'transition' to becoming a black woman

This model has taken “go big or go home” very seriously.

Martina Big, born Martina Adam from Western Germany appeared on “The Maury Show” on Thursday to discuss her “transition” to becoming a black woman.

Big, a model and flight attendant, said she’s always wanted to look like a Barbie or Pamela Anderson, and has had severe body modifications to look the part, including breast implants (she is a size 32S), a nose job, and liposuction.

But this year, Big felt another change was needed: she had three tanning injections in her stomach to change her skin color. “I am now the proud owner of black skin,” she said Thursday.

Big appeared on “The Maury Show” wearing a “Black Girls Rock” necklace with thick black wavy hair extensions and a tight gold dress to discuss her transformation.

“Martina,” Povich asked, “do you think you’re a black person?” Big immediately responded, “yes.” The audience, filled with many African-Americans, went wild.

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Members of the Ku Klux Klan yell as they fly Confederate flags during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane? TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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“But 80 percent,” she quickly amended. “I have to learn a lot. I know.”

Big achieved her current skin color using chemical tanning injections, which darkened over a course of four weeks. She then noticed her eye color and natural hair began to get darker as well.

“Then I noticed that my completely body [sic] changed from a Caucasian to a Black woman,” Big says on her website. When she noticed this, she went “to the government and changed my ethnicity official to ‘Black.’”

The injections fade after a few months, so Big plans to continue getting them each time her color starts to lighten.

Big’s claims she is now black brings to mind Rachel Dolezal, who was infamously the white president of the Spokane, WA Chapter of the NAACP while claiming she was a black woman. But some see Big as worse.

"This WAY BEYOND Rachel Dolezal," said @elhilaly8.

Michael, Big’s husband, was also in the audience, nearly as tan as his wife. When Maury asked him if he felt black also, he replied, “I’m a medium.”

Big claimed she isn’t changing her skin for the attention or to offend anyone, but she’s doing it for herself.

“I am black. That is my race,” she said.

Povich seemed to struggle to figure out how to end the interview. “I don’t want to feel badly for anyone, but you’re different.”

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