'60s drone footage may have helped find lost city of Alexander the Great

Archaeologists believe they have found the lost city of Alexander the Great.

Discovered in Iraq by researchers from the British Museum, they used declassified U.S. drone footage from the 1960’s to examine an area known as Galatga Darband along Lake Dukan.

Recent excavations revealed greek statues among other artifacts.

The site was previously inaccessible due to Saddam Hussein’s control of the region.

The museum’s emergency heritage management training program is helping protect sites like Darband as groups such as ISIS have taken to destroying them for propaganda purposes.

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Alexander the Great
A statue representing 'Alexander the Great' called 'Alexandre Guimet' is presented in the exhibition 'Babylon', on March 10, 2008, at the Musee du Louvre in Paris. The exhibition, which takes place from March 14 to June 2, 2008, brings together nearly 400 works, on loan from collections in 13 countries, with the aim of reconciling the legend of Babylon with its history. Spanning five millennia (from the end of the 2nd millennium B.C. to the beginning of the 20th century), it pays tribute both to the historical and cultural importance of this ancient city. AFP PHOTO STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN (Photo credit should read STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Marble wall block from the temple of Athena Polias at Priene inscribed with the name of Alexander the Great . (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Ruined Citadel, Siwah, Egypt. Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) visited Siwah's oracle of Zeus Amon (the Ancient Greek god Zeus represented with the ram's horns of the Ancient Egyptian god Amon). (Photo by Vivienne Sharp/Heritage Images/Getty Images)
Panorama of the ruins of Persepolis, Iran. Persepolis was built as Persia's new capital city during the reign of Darius I (522-485 BC) and his son Xerxes I (485-465 BC). The city was sacked by Alexander the Great in 330 BC. (Photo by Vivienne Sharp/Heritage Images/Getty Images)
Alexander the Great (356-323 BC), c336-c323 BC. In only 13 years, Alexander III of Macedon conquered a vast empire stretching from the Mediterranean to India. Alexander died of a fever in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar in Babylon, aged only 33, and his empire broke up rapidly after his death. Contemporary Greek bust showing Alexander as a youth. (Photo by Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Relief of Alexander the Great as the Pharaoh before the god Amun-Ra, Temple sacred to Amun Mut and Khons, Luxor, Egypt. (Photo by CM Dixon/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Battle of Issus between Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) and Darius III (d.330 BC) in 333 BC (the Alexander mosaic) - Roman floor mosaic removed from the Casa del Fauno (House of the Faun) at Pompeii, 1rst century BC (342x592 cm) - Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples (Italy) (Photo by Leemage/Corbis via Getty Images)
Iraqi and US officials along with other guests gather at ancient Ur during a handing over ceremony between the US military and Iraqi offcials in southern central Iraq on May 13, 2009. The Ziggurat of Ur which tradition dictates is the Biblical birthplace of Abraham was handed back by the US military to the Iraqi control. The ancient Sumerian city, which dates back to 6000 BC, lies on a former course of the Euphrates, one of the two great rivers of Iraq, and is one of the country's oldest sites. Ur remained an important city until its conquest by Alexander the Great a few centuries before Christ. AFP PHOTO / ESSAM AL-SUDANI (Photo credit should read ESSAM -AL-SUDANI/AFP/Getty Images)
BABYLON, IRAQ: An Iraqi tour guide shows the Mushushu (dragon), one of the symbols of the people of Babylon, depicted on a wall of the ancient city's Ishtar gate, 01 May 1999. Some 90 km south of Baghdad, lie the ruins of Babylon, originaly 'Bab-ili' which could be translated as the 'Gates of the Gods'. The city flourished for about fifteen centuries, from the arrival of the Amorites in 1850 B.C to Alexander the Great who died here in 322 B.C (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images)
BABYLON, IRAQ: One of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's palaces overlooks the ruins of the ancient city of Babylon, 01 May 1999. Some 90 km south of Baghdad, lie the ruins of ancient Babylon, originaly 'Bab-ili' which could be translated as the 'Gates of the Gods'. The city flourished for about fifteen centuries, from the arrival of the Amorites in 1850 B.C to Alexander the Great who died here in 322 B.C (ELECTRONIC IMAGE) (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images)
BABYLON, IRAQ: The renovated walls of the ancient city of Babylon stand over the old ones, 01 May 1999. Some 90 km south of Baghdad, lie the ruins of ancient Babylon, originaly 'Bab-ili' which could be translated as the 'Gates of the Gods'. The city flourished for about fifteen centuries, from the arrival of the Amorites in 1850 B.C to Alexander the Great who died here in 322 B.C (ELECTRONIC IMAGE) (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images)
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