Student survives 3 days locked in cave after group forgets him, forced to lick moisture from cave walls

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — An Indiana University freshman is doing remarkably well after he was trapped in a cave in southern Indiana for nearly three days.

Bloomington-native Lukas Cavar, 19, joined the Caving Club at IU on a “beginner’s trip” last Sunday to Sullivan Cave, which is about 20 miles south of Bloomington. Somehow, he managed to get separated from the group, and when he reached the entrance to exit the cave, he realized the gate was padlocked.

Cavar said he couldn’t get a cell phone signal, so he screamed for hours. He didn’t have much food or any water, so he licked moisture from the cave walls to stay hydrated. “As soon as I noticed the droplets of water on the cave wall, it seemed pretty obvious what I had to do,” Cavar told FOX59.

Cavar said he spent most of his time in the cave talking to himself, napping, and foraging for water.

Cavar told FOX59 that his parents texted him on Monday. When he never responded, they knew something was wrong, and they filed a missing persons report. When members of the caving club found out he was missing, they went back to the cave and rescued him late Tuesday.

Cavar says he was relieved, and he felt lucky to be alive. He doesn’t plan to go spelunking again any time soon.

12 PHOTOS
How to survive a nuclear attack
See Gallery
How to survive a nuclear attack

What should you do in the event of a nearby nuclear attack? Click through to learn more. 

(Photo by Lambert/Getty Images)

Seek shelter immediately, towards the center of a building or -- preferably -- a basement. Aim for the same type of shelter you would utilize in the event of a tornado. 

(Photo via Getty Images)

The next three slides are examples of nuclear shelters that exist around the world. 

(Image via Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)

The entrance of Shelter Co.'s nuclear shelter model room, which is placed in the basement of the company's CEO Seiichiro Nishimoto's house, is pictured in Osaka, Japan April 26, 2017. (Photo via REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon)
A fallout shelter sign hangs on the Mount Rona Baptist Church, on August 9, 2017 in Washington, DC. In the early 60's Washington was at the center of civil defense preparations in case of a nuclear blast, with over one thousand dedicated public fallout shelters in schools, churches and government buildings. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
A 'shelter' sign is displayed at the entrance to a subway station in Seoul on July 6, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. According to the metropolitan government, South Korea's city subway stations serve a dual purpose with over 3,300 designated as shelters in case of aerial bombardment including any threat from North Korea. The U.S. said that it will use military force if needed to stop North Korea's nuclear missile program after North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile on Tuesday into Japanese waters. The latest launch have drawn strong criticism from the U.S. as experts believe the ICBM has the range to reach the U.S. states of Alaska and Hawaii and perhaps the U.S. Pacific Northwest. (Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

Dense materials, including dirt or thick walls, provide the best defense to fallout radiation.

(Photo via Getty Images)

If possible, take a warm shower -- but do not use conditioner, as it can bond to nuclear particles. 

(Photo via Getty Images)

Do not seek shelter in a car, as they won't provide adequate protection, and you should not attempt to outrun nuclear fallout. 

(Photo by Noel Hendrickson via Getty Images)

The nuclear fallout zone shrinks quickly after an attack, but the less dangerous "hot zone" still grows. 

(Image via Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)

Once you are sheltered, do not leave. Listen to a radio or other announcements. 

(Photo via Getty Images)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.