Expert: John Kelly's reactions to Trump signal he could have 'something wrong with him'

White House chief of staff John Kelly made waves earlier this week when he was photographed looking physically upset during President Trump's United Nations speech, raising eyebrows over his views of the 45th commander in chief.

While many are analyzing the highly-discussed facepalm move as a signal of ideological differences between the retired Marine general and president, one body language expert suggests Kelly's public reactions could actually be a red flag of something involving his health.

According to body language expert Dr. Lillian Glass, "there must be something wrong with [Kelly], physically."

Click through to see images of John Kelly in his White House role:

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John Kelly in his White House role
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John Kelly in his White House role
U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly delivers speech at the Secretary of Interior Building in Mexico City, Mexico, July 7, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly speaks about immigration reform at a press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 29, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly testifies before a Homeland Security Subcommittee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S. May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly testifies before a Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., June 6, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly speaks about border security during a press briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 2, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly delivers a statement accompanied by U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (L) at the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Mexico City, Mexico February 23, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly speaks on his phone in a hallway outside the room where U.S. President Donald Trump was meeting with Ukraine President Petro Poroshenko during the U.N. General Assembly in New York, U.S., September 21, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly (L) and First Lady Melania Trump (lower right) listen as U.S. President Donald Trump delivers his address to the United Nations General Assembly in New York, U.S., September 19, 2017. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly (R) shows the time to U.S. Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley (L) as they attend a session on reforming the United Nations at U.N. Headquarters in New York, U.S., September 18, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly (C) stands in an adjacent cabin as U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters in the press cabin aboard Air Force One on his way to Washington after viewing damage from Hurricane Irma in Florida, U.S. September 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly listens as U.S. President Donald Trump makes remarks to reporters before meeting with a bipartisan group of members of Congress at the White House in Washington, U.S., September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly (L) and White House counselor Kellyanne Conway (R) attend Kuwait's Emir Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah and U.S. President Donald Trump's news conference after their meetings at the White House in Washington, U.S. September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly stands before a Medal of Honor ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., July 31, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly (R) arrives with fellow staff to board Air Force One with U.S. President Trump for travel to New Jersey from Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, U.S. August 4, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly looks down at his phone as he boards Air Force One in Hagerstown, Maryland, U.S., hours after it was announced that Trump Senior Adviser Steve Bannon left the administration August 18, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly looks on as he listens to Mexico's Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong (not pictured) delivering a joint message at the Secretary of Interior Building in Mexico City, Mexico, July 7, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly arrives to Secretary of Interior Building before addressing the media, in Mexico City, Mexico, July 7, 2017. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly testifies before a Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., June 6, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
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"Somebody at that level of the military has been trained to keep a check on their emotions. They’ve been trained to keep a check on their p’s and q’s, so to speak," Glass says. "This is not the first time we’ve seen this, where he’s held his head. Does he suffer from migraines? Does he have other health issues? Is he overtired? This has to be looked at, too."

Kelly was previously photographed on separate occasions looking less than pleased with Trump, notably during his remarks in response to the deadly Charlottesville protests. Because this reaction at the United Nations is not the first one open to criticism, Glass poses that there's either something not fully right with his health, or that he needs to get his emotions in line.

SEE ALSO: Did Ivanka Trump's postpartum depression shape policy perspectives?

"If he's actually doing that, then this is not the person to be involved with a president," Glass says. "It's showing disloyalty and it's somebody who has their own agenda. And if he has a problem, he needs to keep his emotions in check and speak to the president privately."

As images of Kelly's reactions have been open to public criticism, internal White House mullings have not positioned Kelly in much better light. From reports that Trump loyalists have nicknamed him "the church lady," to a detail suggesting Trump calls ex-White House strategist Steve Bannon when Kelly isn't around -- it seems Kelly's ability to get a grip on Oval Office operations may be regarded by some as overbearing and unnecessary.

Despite these reports, Trump's external view of Kelly appears favorable.

"General John Kelly is doing a great job as Chief of Staff," the president recently tweeted. "I could not be happier or more impressed - and this Administration continues to get things done at a record clip. Many big decisions to be made over the coming days and weeks. AMERICA FIRST!"

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