Trump orders new sanctions to tighten screws on North Korea nuclear program

NEW YORK, Sept 21 (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump ordered new sanctions on Thursday that open the door wider to blacklisting people and entities doing business with North Korea, including its shipping and trade networks, further tightening the screws on Pyongyang's nuclear and missile programs.

Trump stopped short of going after North Korea's biggest trading partner, China, praising as "tremendous" the central bank's move ordering Chinese banks to stop doing business with NorthKorea.

The additional sanctions on Pyongyang showed that Trump was giving more time for economic pressures to weigh on North Korea after warning about the possibility of military action on Tuesday in his first speech to the United Nations.

RELATED: Satellite images show North Korea nuclear test site

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Satellite images of the Punggye-ri nuclear test site in North Korea
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Satellite images of the Punggye-ri nuclear test site in North Korea
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - APRIL 2, 2017. Figure 1. Activity continues at the North Portal. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - APRIL 2, 2017. Figure 2. Possible new dumping observed at the North Portal spoil pile. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - APRIL 2, 2017. Figure 3. Probable personnel in formation or equipment in rows at the Main Administrative Area. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 30, 2017. Figure 1. No vehicles or trailers remain around the North Portal but well-worn paths are observed. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 30, 2017. Figure 2. No new dumping of material on the North Portal spoil pile. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 30, 2017. Figure 3. Small collection of crates or trailers seen in previous imagery has been removed. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 28, 2017. Figure 3B. Formations seen in the Main Administrative Area, similar to what was seen in lead up to 2013 nuclear test. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 28, 2017. Figure 2. Material dumped at the North Portal tailings pile. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - JANUARY 4, 2013. Figure 3A. Formations seen in the Main Administrative Area in lead up to 2013 nuclear test. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 28, 2017. Figure 1. Continued activity at the North Portal. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 25, 2017. Figure 1. Probable cabling and water drainage seen at the North Portal. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - OCTOBER 19th, 2016: Figure 6: Excavation continued underground in the North Portal area suggesting more tests to come in the same tunnel complex directly under Mt. Mantap. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - JANUARY 5th, 2017: Figure 7: The North Portal spoil pile continued to expand into 2017, becoming increasingly broader. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - JANUARY 22nd, 2017: Figure 8: Late January 2017 imagery showing new spoil on top of recent snow. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - OCTOBER 19th, 2016: Figure 9. A close-up of the North Portal spoil pile as it appeared in late October 2016. The unstable spoil can sometimes lead to accidents, as in this case of toppled rail cars downslope. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - FEBRUARY 12th, 2017: Figure 10. A close-up of the North Portal spoil pile from February 2017 shows that accumulations had begun move westward with a broadening of the top and bottom west side of the pile. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 7th, 2017: Figure 1. DigitalGlobe imagery showing large shipping container or crate seen at the North Portal. Date: March 7, 2017. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 7th, 2017: Figure 2. DigitalGlobe imagery showing no changes to pattern and texture of tailings (spoil) pile at the North Portal. Date: March 7, 2017. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 7th, 2017: Figure 3. DigitalGlobe imagery showing a small vehicle present at the West Portal. Date: March 7, 2017. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 7th, 2017: Figure 4. DigitalGlobe imagery showing a truck present in the southern courtyard of the Main Administrative Area. Date: March 7, 2017. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 7th, 2017: Figure 5. DigitalGlobe imagery showing a truck present at the sites Command Center. Date: March 7, 2017. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - MARCH 7th, 2017: Figure 6. DigitalGlobe imagery showing snow cleared at guard barrack and security checkpoint. Date: March 7, 2017. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - OCTOBER 24, 2016: Figure 2. No activity seen at the Sohae launch pad. Date: October 24, 2016. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - OCTOBER 24, 2016: Figure 3. Environmental shed remains adjacent to the vertical engine test stand. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
PUNGGYE-RI NUCLEAR TEST SITE, NORTH KOREA - OCTOBER 29, 2016: Figure 1C. Increased activity around the North Portal throughout October. Date: October 29, 2016. (Photo DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images)
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Asked ahead of a lunch meeting with the leaders of Japan and South Korea if diplomacy was still possible, Trump nodded his head and said, "Why not?"

North Korea has launched dozens of missiles under Kim Jong Un’s leadership as it accelerates a weapons program designed to give it the ability to target the United States with a powerful, nuclear-tipped missile.

Resisting intensifying international pressure, Pyongyang conducted its sixth and largest nuclear test on Sept. 3 and has launched numerous missiles this year, including two intercontinental ballistic missiles.

Trump said the new executive order "significantly expands our authority to target individual companies, financial institutions, that finance and facilitate trade with North Korea" and "will cut off sources of revenue that fund North Korea's efforts to develop the deadliest weapons known to humankind."

The U.S. Treasury Department now had authority to target those that conduct "significant trade in goods, services or technology with North Korea."

Trump did not mention Pyongyang's oil trade. The White House, in a statement, later said NorthKorea's energy, medical, mining, textiles and transportation industries were among those targeted and that the U.S. Treasury could sanction anyone who owns, controls or operates a port of entry in North Korea.

RELATED: Trumps speaks at UN

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President Donald Trump speaks at the United Nations
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President Donald Trump speaks at the United Nations
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 19: President Donald Trump prepares to speak to world leaders at the 72nd United Nations (UN) General Assembly at UN headquarters in New York on September 19, 2017 in New York City. This is Trump� first appearance at the General Assembly where he addressed threats from Iran and North Korea among other global concerns. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives to address the 72nd United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters in New York, U.S., September 19, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
U.S. President Donald Trump steps up to deliver his address to the United Nations General Assembly in New York, U.S., September 19, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
US President Donald Trump arrives to address the 72nd Annual UN General Assembly in New York on September 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 19: President Donald Trump prepares to speak to world leaders at the 72nd United Nations (UN) General Assembly at UN headquarters in New York on September 19, 2017 in New York City. This is Trump� first appearance at the General Assembly where he addressed threats from Iran and North Korea among other global concerns. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the 72nd United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters in New York, U.S., September 19, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the 72nd United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters in New York, U.S., September 19, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
US President Donald Trump addresses the 72nd Annual UN General Assembly in New York on September 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump addresses the 72nd Annual UN General Assembly in New York on September 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Jewel SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
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Four sources earlier told Reuters that China's central bank has told banks to strictly implement United Nations sanctions against North Korea.

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said banks doing business in North Korea would not be allowed to also operate in the United States.

"No bank in any country should be used to facilitate Kim Jong Un's destructive behavior," Mnuchin told reporters.

"Foreign financial institutions are now on notice that going forward they can choose to do business with the United States or with North Korea, but not both."

Mnuchin said any sanctions issued under the new executive order signed by Trump on Thursday would be forward-looking and not target past behavior.

The U.N. Security Council has unanimously imposed nine rounds of sanctions on North Koreasince 2006, the latest this month capping fuel supplies to the isolated state.

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Melania Trump stuns with UN speech
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Melania Trump stuns with UN speech
US First Lady Melania Trump addresses other spouses of world leaders at a United Nations luncheon on September 20, 2017, in the United States Mission in New York. The First Lady addressed the issue of vulnerable children around the world. / AFP PHOTO / DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
US First Lady Melania Trump arrives to address other first spouses of world leaders at a United Nations luncheon on September 20, 2017, at the United States Mission in New York. The First Lady addressed the issue of vulnerable children around the world. / AFP PHOTO / DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
US First Lady Melania Trump arrives to address other first spouses of world leaders at a United Nations luncheon on September 20, 2017, at the United States Mission in New York. The First Lady addressed the issue of vulnerable children around the world. / AFP PHOTO / DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
US First Lady Melania Trump addresses other spouses of world leaders at a United Nations luncheon on September 20, 2017, in the United States Mission in New York. The First Lady addressed the issue of vulnerable children around the world. / AFP PHOTO / DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - SEPTEMBER 20 : (----EDITORIAL USE ONLY MANDATORY CREDIT - 'TURKISH PRESIDENCY / HANDOUT' - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS----) Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (2 L) and his wife Emine Erdogan (L) pose for a photo with US President Donald Trump (2 R) and his wife Melania Trump (R) during their meeting within the 72nd session of the UN General Assembly in New York, United States on September 20, 2017. (Photo by Turkish Presidency / Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 19: U.S. first lady Melania Trump and President Donald Trump depart the United Nations after the president's speech on September 19, 2017 in New York City. He addressed his first General Assembly meeting. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 19: First Lady Melania Trump listens as U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the United Nations General Assembly at UN headquarters, September 19, 2017 in New York City. Among the issues facing the assembly this year are North Korea's nuclear developement, violence against the Rohingya Muslim minority in Myanmar and the debate over climate change. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 19: U.S. President Donald Trump stands with U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley (L) and first lady Melania Trump upon arrival to the UN headquarters on September 19, 2017 in New York City. He addressed world leaders for the first time at the annual UN General Assembly meeting. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, USA - SEPTEMBER 20 : (----EDITORIAL USE ONLY MANDATORY CREDIT - 'PRIME MINISTRY OF BULGARIA / HANDOUT' - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS----) Bulgarian President Rumen Radev (2 L) and his wife Desislava Radeva (L) pose for a photo with US President Donald Trump (2 R) and his wife Melania Trump (R) during the 72nd session of the UN General Assembly in New York, United States on September 20, 2017. (Photo by Prime Ministry of Bulgaria / Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
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European Union ambassadors have reached an initial agreement to impose more economic sanctions on North Korea, going beyond the latest round of U.N. measures, officials and diplomats said.

Trump warned the North Korean leader in his U.N. address on Tuesday that the United States, if threatened, would "totally destroy" his country of 26 million people.

It was Trump's most direct military threat to attack North Korea and his latest expression of concern about Pyongyang’s repeated launching of ballistic missiles over Japan and underground nuclear tests.

North Korea's foreign minister likened Trump to a "barking dog" in response.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who met with Trump on Thursday and addressed the U.N. General Assembly, said sanctions were needed to bring Pyongyang to the negotiating table and force it to give up its nuclear weapons, but Seoul was not seeking North Korea's collapse.

"All of our endeavors are to prevent war from breaking out and maintain peace," Moon said in his speech. He warned the nuclear issue had to be managed stably so that "accidental military clashes will not destroy peace."

China's foreign minister Wang Yi called on North Korea not to go further in a "dangerous direction" with its nuclear program and said negotiation was the only way out of the crisis over Pyongyang's weapons development, calling on all parties to help ease tensions.

"There is still hope for peace and we must not give up. Negotiation is the only way out ... Parties should meet each other half way, by addressing each other’s legitimate concerns.”

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe who was at the lunch said "dialog for the sake of dialog will not produce anything," urging that pressure on Pyongyang be applied in a "robust manner." Two missiles fired by North Korea in recent weeks flew over Japan.

In Geneva, North Korea told a U.N. rights panel that international sanctions would endanger the survival of North Korean children.

AID PLAN

Anthony Ruggiero with the Foundation for Defense of Democracies think tank said of Trump's order: "This approach worked with Iran as companies, banks, governments and individuals chose the United States, and likely will restrict North Korea’s revenue."

South Korea approved a plan on Thursday to send $8 million worth of aid to North Korea, as China warned the crisis on the Korean peninsula was getting more serious by the day.

The United States and South Korea are technically still at war with North Korea because the 1950-53 Korean conflict ended with a truce and not a peace treaty. The North accuses the United States, which has 28,500 troops in South Korea, of planning to invade and regularly threatens to destroy it and its Asian allies.

Last month, the Trump administration blacklisted 16 Chinese, Russian and Singaporean companies and people for trading with banned North Korean entities, including in coal, oil and metals.

On Wednesday, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said there were "some indications" that sanctions were beginning to cause fuel shortages in North Korea.

(Reporting by Steve Holland and David Brunnstrom; Additional reporting by Michelle Nichols in New York, Jeff Mason, Susan Heavey, Doina Chiacu, Eric Walsh and Tim Ahmann in Washington and Robin Emmott in Brussels; Writing by Yara Bayoumy; Editing by Grant McCool and James Dalgleish)

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