Tenth person dies from nursing home that lost air conditioning after Hurricane Irma

The death toll from the south Florida nursing home that became a lethal sauna after Hurricane Irma knocked out the air conditioning rose to 10 on Thursday, authorities said.

The latest casualty was identified as 94-year-old Martha Murray, a patient at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills who died on Wednesday, the Hollywood Police Department reported.

The Broward County Medical Examiner did not release the cause of Murray's death, but authorities have described the other nine deaths as heat related and a criminal investigation by the Hollywood Police and the state attorney general is under way.

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Florida nursing home lost air conditioning after Hurricane Irma
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Florida nursing home lost air conditioning after Hurricane Irma
Police surround the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, which had no air conditioning after Hurricane Irma knocked out power, on Sept. 13, 2017 in Hollywood, Fla. So far, nine deaths have been blamed on the incedent. (John McCall, South Florida Sun-Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
From left, Dr. Randy Katz, Medical Director, Emergency Services, Judy Frum, RN, Chief Nursing Officer and Zeff Ross, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer, during a news conference on Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017. The news conference took place a day after eight people died at the nursing home, as a criminal investigation by local agencies continued into how the rehab center allowed patients to stay without a working air conditioning system during the passing of Hurricane Irma through South Florida. (Pedro Portal/El Nuevo Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
Messages left on the sidewalk of the Rehabilitation Center of Hollywood Hills nursing home a day after eight people died at the nursing home, as a criminal investigation by local agencies continued into how the rehab center allowed patients to stay without a working air conditioning system during the passing of Hurricane Irma through South Florida, on Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017. (Pedro Portal/El Nuevo Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
Vendetta Craig, who had left her 87-year-old mother Edna Jefferson in the care of the Rehabilitation Center of Hollywood Hills, speaks during a news conference flanked by, from left, Dr. Randy Katz, Medical Director, Emergency Services, Judy Frum, RN, Chief Nursing Officer, and Tracy Meltzer, director of nursing. The news conference took place a day after eight people died at the nursing home, as a criminal investigation by local agencies continued into how the rehab center allowed patients to stay without a working air conditioning system during the passing of Hurricane Irma through South Florida, on Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017. (Pedro Portal/El Nuevo Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
Hollywood Police chief Tomas Sanchez and Raelin Storey answer questions outside of a Hollywood nursing home that had no air conditioning after Hurricane Irma knocked out power, Sept. 13, 2017. Three people died at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills and three others later died at Memorial Regional Hospital. (John McCall, South Florida Sun-Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
Flora Mitchell, of Dania Beach, answers questions from the media outside of a Hollywood nursing home that had no air conditioning after Hurricane Irma knocked out power, Sept. 13, 2017. Three people died at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills and three others later died at Memorial Regional Hospital. (John McCall, South Florida Sun-Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
Elie Pina, of Hollywood, answers questions from the media outside of a Hollywood nursing home that had no air conditioning after Hurricane Irma knocked out power, Sept. 13, 2017. Three people died at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills and three others later died at Memorial Regional Hospital. (John McCall, South Florida Sun-Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills is seen in Hollywood, north of Miami, Florida, U.S., September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Innerarity
Firefighters cross police tape with the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills in the background in Hollywood, north of Miami, Florida, U.S. September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Innerarity
City of Hollywood police officers were on hand for crowds of people and heavy traffic at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills in Hollywood, north of Miami, Florida, U.S., September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Innerarity
Guillermo Nunez speaks to the media regarding the condition of Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills patient, Saga Garcia, the mother of his sister in law in front of the Center in Hollywood, north of Miami, Florida, U.S., September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Innerarity
A street sign lies askew across the traffic circle from the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills in Hollywood, north of Miami, Florida, U.S., September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Innerarity
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"Your heart just goes out to those families — you hate that those people suffered like that," Gov. Rick Scott said. "You know, I used to be in the health care business and so the most important thing you want to do is keep everybody safe. I don't understand how they made the decision not to call 911."

Murray died more than a week after Irma roared through the Sunshine State. Nobody apparently called 911 until three days after Irma hit — and after the elderly residents had already spent three days sweltering in stiflingly hot rooms despite the fact that a fully functioning and air-conditioned hospital is right across the street.

The latest death was announced a day after the state Agency for Health Care Administration suspended the facility's license to operate.

Meanwhile, the family of Rose Cabrera, 94, a diabetic and double-amputee who survived the ordeal, has filed a lawsuit accusing the nursing home of "reckless and negligent indifference."

Irma reached Broward County on Sept. 10 and knocked out a transformer that powered the home's air conditioner.

Eight of the elderly victims died three days later as the 158 patients were being evacuated from the facility. A ninth, Carlos Canal, 93, died on Tuesday, officials said.

In a Sept. 13 statement, nursing home administrator Jorge Carballo said the center and its staff "diligently prepared for the impact of Hurricane Irma" and were cooperating fully with authorities. He said staffers used fans, ice and other means to cool the patients.

"Our staff continually checked on our residents' well-being — our most important concern — to ensure they were hydrated and as comfortable as possible," Carballo insisted.

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Aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Florida
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Aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Florida
A destroyed trailer park is seen after Hurricane Irma strikes Florida, in Plantation Key in the Florida Keys, U.S., September 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A destroyed trailer park is seen after Hurricane Irma strikes Florida, in Plantation Key in the Florida Keys, U.S., September 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Local residents walk along a destroyed trailer park after Hurricane Irma strikes Florida, in Plantation Key in the Florida Keys, U.S., September 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A boat is seen on a highway as local residents return to a destroyed area after Hurricane Irma strikes Florida, in Plantation Key in the Florida Keys, U.S., September 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
MIAMI BEACH, FL - SEPTEMBER 12: Maria Soto and Michael Perez return home for the first time after seeking shelter in a friend's home when Hurricane Irma passed through the area on September 12, 2017 in Miami Beach, Florida. Florida took a direct hit from the Hurricane. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
The damaged house of Stasia Walsh is seen at the Enchanted Shores manufactured home park in Naples, Florida, on September 11, 2017 after Hurricane Irma hit Florida. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
BONITA SPRINGS, FL - SEPTEMBER 10: Don Cole removes belongings from his home that was flooded by Hurricane Irma on September 12, 2017 in Bonita Springs, Florida. On Sunday Hurricane Irma hit Florida's west coast leaving widespread power outages and flooding. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
FLORIDA KEYS, FL - SEPTEMBER 11: Overturned trailer homes are seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma on September 11, 2017 over the Florida Keys, Florida (Photo by Matt McClain -Pool/Getty Images)
FLORIDA KEYS, FL - SEPTEMBER 11: Damage to a roof is seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma on September 11, 2017 over the Florida Keys, Florida (Photo by Matt McClain-Pool/Getty Images)
NAPLES, FL - SEPTEMBER 11: A destroyed gas station is seen after Hurricane Irma passes in Naples, Fla. on Monday, Sept 11, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
IMMOKALEE, FL -SEP 11: Adela Silverio tries to put back a window that was blown out from its frame on her trailer during Hurricane Irma. -The town of Immokalee, Florida was hit hard by Hurricane Irma. The community has many farm workers that live in poor living conditions and their homes seemed to be hit the hardest by the storm. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
A car drives past fallen palm fronds in Naples, Florida, on September 11, 2017 after Hurricane Irma hit Florida. Millions of Florida residents were without power and extensive damage was reported in the Florida Keys but most of the Sunshine State appeared to have dodged forecasts of catastrophic damage from Hurricane Irma. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
KEY WEST, FL - SEPTEMBER 11: A sunken boat is shown in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma on September 11, 2017 in Key West, Florida. (Photo by Matt McClain-Pool/Getty Images)
JACKSONVILLE, FL - SEPTEMBER 11: Justin Hand navigates storm surge flood waters from Hurricane Irma along the St. Johns River on Sept. 11, 2017 in Jacksonville, Florida. Flooding in downtown Jacksonville along the river topped a record set during Hurricane Dora in 1965. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
JACKSONVILLE, FL - SEPTEMBER 11: The St. Johns River rises from storm surge flood waters from Hurricane Irma on Sept. 11, 2017 in Jacksonville, Florida. Flooding in downtown Jacksonville along the river topped a record set during Hurricane Dora in 1965. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
JACKSONVILLE, FL - SEPTEMBER 11: The St. Johns River rises from storm surge flood waters from Hurricane Irma on Sept. 11, 2017 in Jacksonville, Florida. Flooding in downtown Jacksonville along the river topped a record set during Hurricane Dora in 1965. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
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