School teacher fired over racist Facebook rant claims account was hacked

A Mississippi school teacher has been dismissed from her role after she was accused of posting a racist rant on Facebook.

Cammie Rone, who taught at Batesville Intermediate School in Paloma County, has denied authoring a post suggesting that black people who are unhappy living in the United States move back to Africa.

"If blacks in this country are so offended no one is forcing them to stay here," the post begins, according to WREG.

"Why don't they pack up and move back to Africa where they will have to work for a living. I am sure our government will pay for it! We pay for everything else," the rest of the post read.

Rone claims that her Facebook account was hacked before the post appeared.

"I think my account was hacked. I keep getting messages about racist posts, but when I go to my page, I can't see it," Rone wrote on Facebook, according to WREG.

She added that her own posts are usually about "cows, recipes and home improvement stuff not racism."

Parents doubted that Rone's Facebook account had been hacked and called for her to be removed from the classroom.

RELATED: White supremacy in America

11 PHOTOS
White supremacy in America
See Gallery
White supremacy in America
A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he marches during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of a white supremacy group gives the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES) REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group shouts during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group stands behind a flag with a swastika during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of the Ku Klux Klan who says his name is Gary Munker poses for a photo during an interview with AFP in Hampton Bays, New York on November 22, 2016. Munker says his local branch of the KKK, which has recently placed recruitment flyers on car windshields on Long Island, has seen around 1,000 enquiries from people interested in joining since the election of Donald Trump. / AFP / William EDWARDS (Photo credit should read WILLIAM EDWARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of a white supremacy group give the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A supporter of the Ku Klux Klan is seen with his tattoos during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he listens to the crowd while carrying a Confederate flag during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan yells during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week.REUTERS/Chris Keane
Members of the Ku Klux Klan yell as they fly Confederate flags during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane? TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"I don't feel right with her teaching him," parent Keboni Anderson said before her dismissal was announced.

"She came to me as a good person and then when I read the comment it rubbed me the wrong way," she added, WREG reported.

The school district said that Rone was dismissed on Tuesday, Sept. 19, shortly after it became aware of the controversial post.

"Cammie Rone has been dismissed from our employment," South Panola School district public information director Jeff Eubanks told the Daily News.

"She is no longer an employee of the South Panola School District," he added.

The school district's employee conduct police stipulates that employees are responsible for "promoting a positive environment for teaching, learning and student well-being."

"Unseemly dress, conduct or the use of abusive, foul or profane language in the presence of students is expressly prohibited and will not be tolerated," it says.

"With the prevalence of technology and social networking, professional conduct must be maintained in these arenas as well to protect individuals' rights and the integrity of the institution."

It explains that severe violations of the policy can result in suspension, dismissal, or non-renewal.

Rone has the right to appeal the school district's decision and appear before the school board for a hearing.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.