Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte says son will be killed if involved with drugs

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said Wednesday he would have his son killed if accusations of drug trafficking against him proved true, and that he also would protect the police who would kill his son from prosecution, according to The Guardian.

Duterte's son, Paolo Duterte, denied trafficking allegations made against him in front of a senate inquiry earlier this month. The younger Duterte reportedly has been accused of being a member of a Chinese triad gang and assisting in the smuggling of a large shipment of crystal methamphetamine from China.

During last year's election race, Rodrigo Duterte – who took office in June 2016 and has initiated a violent war against drug use in the country – said none of his children were involved with drugs, but that if they were, they would face severe punishment.

RELATED: Little-known facts about Duterte

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Everything you didn't know about Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte
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Everything you didn't know about Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte

Duterte was born on March 28, 1945 in Maasin, Southern Leyte, Philippines.

(PHILIPPINES-DAVAO/MODEL REUTERS/Renato Lumawag)

Duterte became the mayor of Davao City in 1988, where he earned the nickname “The Punisher.” He served as mayor for 20 years, non-consecutively.

(PHILIPPINES-DAVAO/MODEL REUTERS/Renato Lumawag)

Duterte comes from a family of politicians. His father, Vicente Duterte, was the governor of unified Davao and a member of President Ferdinand Marcos' cabinet. His daughter, Sara Duterte, is currently the mayor of Davao City.

(REUTERS/Erik De Castro)

Rodrigo Duterte was elected the 16th president of the Philippines in May 2016.

(REUTERS/Czar Dancel)

Duterte once compared himself to Adolf Hitler, saying he would kill millions of drug addicts.

(REUTERS/Ezra Acayan)

Duterte has led a violent anti-drug crackdown, and more than 7,000 have reportedly been killed since he has taken office. 

(Photo credit should read NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images)

Duterte called President Barack Obama a “son of a wh**e.” He made the comments after Obama brought up concerns about human rights violations in 2016. Duterte later apologized for the comment.

(Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Weeks before being sworn in as president, Duterte fueled an already hostile environment for journalists when he said, "Just because you're a journalist you are not exempted from assassination, if you're a son of a b****." 

(REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco)

In 2015, Duterte vowed to execute 100,000 criminals and dump their bodies into Manila Bay. 

(REUTERS/Czar Dancel)

Duterte cursed Pope Francis over traffic that was generated by his visit. 

"We were affected by the traffic," Duterte said. "It took us five hours. I asked why, they said it was closed. I asked who is coming. They answered, the Pope. I wanted to call him: 'Pope, son of a wh**e, go home. Do not visit us again'."

He later apologized. 

(PHILIPPINES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

Duterte came under fire in April 2016 after he made a joke about a missionary who was gang raped and murdered during a prison riot in 1989. “But she was so beautiful,” Duterte said. “I thought the mayor should have been first.” 

(REUTERS/Harley Palangchao)

A witness testified in Sept. 2016, claiming he was a member of Duterte's alleged "Davao Death Squad," and that the Filipino president gave orders to kill drug dealers, drug users and others who may violate the law. 

(Photo credit should read Ezra Acayan / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

In December of 2016, Duterte said President Donald Trump endorses his violent and deadly campaign against drugs after a brief phone call. 

(REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco)

Congressman Gary Alejano filed an impeachment complaint against Duterte in March 2017, claiming he is guilty of crimes against humanity and murder.

(REUTERS/Erik De Castro TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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He reiterated that stance this week during a speech in Manila.

"I said before my order was: 'If I have children who are into drugs, kill them so people will not have anything to say,'" Duterte said Wednesday, according to The Guardian. "So I told [Paolo]: 'My order is to kill you if you are caught. And I will protect the police who kill you, if it is true.'"

Philippine authorities have reported the deaths of more than 3,800 people in connection with anti-drug operations since July of last year. Thousands of other killings have reportedly occurred as well.

Protesters both for and against Duterte held rallies in the Philippines on Thursday. Supporters see the president as their best chance for change and a leader concerned about ordinary people, Reuters reports, while opponents see him as a reminder of the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

Copyright 2017 U.S. News & World Report

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