Cassini captured mysterious 'glitch' on Saturn's rings before death dive

Cassini sent home one last batch of photos from Saturn before plunging to its death Friday and among them was an attempt to record a mysterious object embedded in the planet's rings, otherwise known as "Peggy."

Peggy lives along the edge of Saturn and is an anomaly from which researchers have been unable to unearth the source.

RELATED: Cassini crash lands on Saturn

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Cassini crash lands on Saturn
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Cassini crash lands on Saturn
PASADENA, CA - SEPTEMBER 13: Director of Planetary Science, NASA, Jim Green (L), Cassini Project Manager, Earl Maize, and Cassini Project Scientist, Linda Spilker, address a news conference at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as NASA's Cassini spacecraft nears the end of its 20-year mission by crashing into Saturn, on September 13, 2017 in Pasadena, California. It took Cassini seven years to reach Saturn after its 1997 launch where it has been exploring the ringed planet and its many moons for the past 13 years. It will continue to transmit data and never before seen photos to Earth for as long as possible before breaking up and crashing. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
PASADENA, CA - SEPTEMBER 13: Cassini Project Scientist, Linda Spilker (L), Cassini Project Manager, Earl Maize, and Director of Planetary Science, NASA, Jim Green (R), address a news conference at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as NASA's Cassini spacecraft nears the end of its 20-year mission by crashing into Saturn, on September 13, 2017 in Pasadena, California. It took Cassini seven years to reach Saturn after its 1997 launch where it has been exploring the ringed planet and its many moons for the past 13 years. It will continue to transmit data and never before seen photos to Earth for as long as possible before breaking up and crashing. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
A model of the Cassini spacecraft is seen at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) September 13, 2017 in Pasadena, California. Cassini's 20-year mission to study Saturn will end on September 15, 2017 when the spacecraft burns up after intentionally plunging in the ringed planet's atmosphere in what NASA is calling 'The Grand Finale.' / AFP PHOTO / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
Cassini science team members Nora Alonge (R), Scott Edgington (C) and Jo Pitesky (L) hug as the final loss of signal from the Cassini spacecraft is confirmed, indicating Cassini's destruction in Saturn's atmosphere and the end of Cassini's 20-year mission to gain a better understanding of the ringed planet and its icy moons, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California on September 15, 2017 . Within moments of loss of signal the spacecraft will plunge into Saturn's atmosphere where it will burn up and disappear in what NASA is calling The Grand Finale. / AFP PHOTO / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
The spacecraft Cassini is pictured above Saturn's northern hemisphere prior to making one of its Grand Finale dives in this NASA handout illustration obtained by Reuters August 29, 2017. NASA/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.
Cassini science team members Nora Alonge (R) and Jo Pitesky (L) react as the final loss of signal from the Cassini spacecraft is confirmed, indicating Cassini's destruction in Saturn's atmosphere and the end of Cassini's 20-year mission to gain a better understanding of the ringed planet and its icy moons, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California on September 15, 2017 . Within moments of loss of signal the spacecraft will plunge into Saturn's atmosphere where it will burn up and disappear in what NASA is calling The Grand Finale. / AFP PHOTO / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
NASA Director of Planetary Science Jim Green (L), Cassini Project Manager Earl Maize (2L), Cassini Project Scientist Linda Spilker (2R) and Hunter Waite, (R), team lead for Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer, speak at a news briefing for the end of the Cassini mission to Saturn, September 13, 2017 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The Cassini mission will end on September 15, 2017 when the spacecraft burns up after intentionally plunging in the ringed planet's atmosphere. / AFP PHOTO / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
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The bizarre disturbance was first noticed in 2013 by London researcher Carl Murray, who named it after his mother-in-law after making the discovery on her birthday. And its effects on dust particles and surrounding ice has been recorded ever since.

Murray believes Peggy is a moon forming within the planet's rings, though researchers have yet to receive a direct image of Peggy's form.

RELATED: Cassini's best photos through the years

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Cassini's best photos through the years
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Cassini's best photos through the years
IN SPACE - AUGUST 18: In this handout image provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), looking toward the sunlit side of the rings, Saturn's rings and the icy moon Enceladus are seen in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Aug. 18, 2015. Saturn's night side (top C), is illuminated by sunlight reflected off the rings. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 87,000 miles from Enceladus. Between April and September 2017, Cassini will plunge repeatedly through the gap that separates the planet from the rings. The Cassini mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via Getty Images)
IN SPACE - NOVEMBER 19: In this handout image provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the planet Saturn's 'Death Star' moon Mimas is shown from a distance of approximately 28,000 miles (45,000 kilometers), taken by NASA's spacecraft Cassini-Huygens in its closest approach to the pock-marked moon on January 30, 2017. The lighting, reflected from Saturn, has been enhanced by NASA. Cassini is nearing the end of its nearly 20-year mission. (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via Getty Images)
IN SPACE - JANUARY 18: In this handout image provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Saturn's sunlit face is visible in this view from the vantage point just beneath the unilluminated side beneath the ring plane and taken in green light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Jan. 18, 2017. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 630,000 miles from Saturn. Between April and September 2017, Cassini will plunge repeatedly through the gap that separates the planet from the rings. The Cassini mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via Getty Images)
IN SPACE - JANUARY 16: In this handout image provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the wavemaker moon, Daphnis, is featured in this view, taken as NASA's Cassini spacecraft made one of its ring-grazing passes over the outer edges of Saturn's rings on Jan. 16, 2017. Daphnis (5 miles across) orbits within the 26-mile wide Keeler Gap. Between April and September 2017, Cassini will plunge repeatedly through the gap that separates the planet from the rings. The Cassini mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via Getty Images)
IN SPACE - DECEMBER 18: In this handout image provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Dec. 18, 2016. The image features a density wave in Saturn's A ring (at left) that lies around 134,500 km from Saturn. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 34,000 miles (56,000 kilometers) from the rings and looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings. Between April and September 2017, Cassini will plunge repeatedly through the gap that separates the planet from the rings. The Cassini mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via Getty Images)
IN SPACE - DECEMBER 2: In this handout image provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the image of Saturn's atmosphere was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Dec. 2, 2016 The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 592,000 miles (953,000 kilometers) from Saturn. Between April and September 2017, Cassini will plunge repeatedly through the gap that separates the planet from the rings. The Cassini mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via Getty Images)
IN SPACE - APRIL 8: In this handout image provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), this view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings shows a bright disruption in Saturn's narrow F ring from about 15 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 8, 2016. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.4 million miles from Saturn. Between April and September 2017, Cassini will plunge repeatedly through the gap that separates the planet from the rings. The Cassini mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via Getty Images)
The Galilean satellite Io floats above the cloudtops of Jupiter in this image captured on January 1, 2001. Cassini Spacecraft. (Photo by: Photo12/UIG via Getty Images)
From on high, the Cassini spacecraft spies a group of three ring moons in their travels around Saturn. (Photo by: Photo12/UIG via Getty Images)
IN SPACE - JANUARY 28: In this handout image provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), this view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings and was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Jan. 28, 2016. The 2,980-mile-wide division in Saturn's rings (seen between the bright B ring and dimmer A ring) was acquired at a distance of approximately 740,000 miles (1.2 million kilometers) from Saturn. Between April and September 2017, Cassini will plunge repeatedly through the gap that separates the planet from the rings. The Cassini mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via Getty Images)
IN SPACE - JULY 19: In this handout from NASA, the planet Saturn is seen backlit by the sun, sent Cassini spacecraft July 19, 2013 in space. NASA unvieled the image, that spans 404,880 miles (651,591 kilometers) across, November 12, 2013. Besides the rings, three planets, Mars, Venus and Earth, are visible in the image. (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI via Getty Images)
In this rare image taken on July 19, 2013, the wide-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft has captured Saturn's rings and our planet Earth and its moon in the same frame. It is only one footprint in a mosaic of 33 footprints covering the entire Saturn ring system (including Saturn itself). At each footprint, images were taken in different spectral filters for a total of 323 images: some were taken for scientific purposes and some to produce a natural color mosaic. This is the only wide-angle footprint that has the Earth-moon system in it. (Photo by NASA/Handout/Corbis via Getty Images)
This true-color simulated view of Jupiter is composed of 4 images taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft on December 7, 2000. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Shadows cast by Saturn's rings darken the southern hemisphere of the planet and give a truncated appearance to the bottom of this Cassini spacecraft image. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Sunlight scattering through the periphery of Titan's atmosphere reaches Cassini as the spacecraft's camera is pointed at the dark side of the moon. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Rhea's trailing hemisphere shows off its wispy terrain on the left of this image which includes Saturn's rings in the distance. Cassini. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Saturn's small moon Prometheus. Cassini. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
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Based on the size of the disturbance, however, Peggy's mass is estimated to be quite large. Researchers speculate its current form is likely a large cloud of debris and that it's been quite active as it is predicted to have split into two several years ago.

“When Cassini came out of its ring plane orbit in early 2016, we went back to look where Peggy should be; and we found Peggy and we've been tracking it ever since,” Murray told BBC News earlier this year.

SEE ALSO: Photos: 10 breathtaking images from Cassini’s ground-breaking mission of studying Saturn

“But a few degrees behind we could also see another object, even fainter in the sense that it had an even smaller (disturbance) signature. And when we tracked back the paths of both objects, we realized that in early 2015 they would have met," Murray added. "So, probably, Peggy 'B', as we call it, came from a collision of the sort that causes Peggy to change its orbit, but rather than a simple encounter that deflected the orbit slightly, this was more serious.”

Now Murray and his team are using the data obtained by the NASA spacecraft before its plunge into Saturn. “I couldn’t find Peggy in the data though I’m still looking,” he told Gizmodo. “Peggy’s probably there, I just haven’t found exactly where yet.”

“I’m used to every day going to the computers when the images come down [to] just look for fun stuff, like Peggy!” Murray explained. “It’s going to take me awhile to get used not getting to see these images every day.”

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