Hobby Lobby controversy erupts after woman complains about 'racist' cotton display

Many on social media have spoken out in defense of Hobby Lobby after a woman complained about the store selling an item she perceived as being racist. 

The controversy began when Daniell Rider from Texas posted a picture to the company’s Facebook page last week showing cotton stems on a store shelf.

Hobby Lobby's battle against Obamacare

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Hobby Lobby's battle against Obamacare
A demonstrator in support of U.S. President Barack Obama's health-care law contraception requirement holds up a sign outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, March 25, 2014. Hobby Lobby, a family-owned business that says it looks to the Bible for guidance, is seeking a religious exemption from the requirement that employers cover birth control as part of worker-insurance plans. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Demonstrators in support of U.S. President Barack Obama's health-care law contraception requirement hold up signs outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, March 25, 2014. Hobby Lobby, a family-owned business that says it looks to the Bible for guidance, is seeking a religious exemption from the requirement that employers cover birth control as part of worker-insurance plans. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 25: Demonstrators rally outside of the U.S. Supreme Court during oral arguments in Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby March 25, 2014 in Washington, DC. The court heard from lawyers on both sides of Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby, a case that may determine whether the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993 allows a for-profit corporation to deny its employees the health coverage of contraceptives to which the employees are otherwise entitled by federal law, based on the religious objections of the corporation's owners. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
A demonstrator in favor of Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. and opposed to U.S. President Barack Obama's health-care law contraception requirement holds up a sign outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, March 25, 2014. A divided U.S. Supreme Court debated whether companies can assert religious rights, hearing arguments in an ideological clash over President Barack Obama's health care law and rules that promote contraceptive coverage. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A demonstrator in support of U.S. President Barack Obama's health-care law contraception requirement holds up a sign outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, March 25, 2014. Hobby Lobby, a family-owned business that says it looks to the Bible for guidance, is seeking a religious exemption from the requirement that employers cover birth control as part of worker-insurance plans. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 25: Demonstrators rally outside of the U.S. Supreme Court during oral arguments in Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby March 25, 2014 in Washington, DC. The court heard from lawyers on both sides of Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby, a case that may determine whether the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993 allows a for-profit corporation to deny its employees the health coverage of contraceptives to which the employees are otherwise entitled by federal law, based on the religious objections of the corporation's owners. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Anti-abortion demonstrators cheer as the ruling for Hobby Lobby was announced outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington June 30, 2014. The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled that business owners can object on religious grounds to a provision of U.S. President Barack Obama's healthcare law that requires closely held companies to provide health insurance that covers birth control. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION POLITICS HEALTH CIVIL UNREST)
Kristan Hawkins of Students for Life leads anti-abortion demonstrators as they cheer after the ruling for Hobby Lobby was announced outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington June 30, 2014. The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled that business owners can object on religious grounds to a provision of U.S. President Barack Obama's healthcare law that requires closely held companies to provide health insurance that covers birth control. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW RELIGION POLITICS HEALTH)
A demonstrator in support of abortion and contraceptive rights (L) shoves his poster in the face of a demonstrator holding a sign which reads: "I am the Pro-life Generation", after the Hobby Lobby ruling outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington June 30, 2014. The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled that business owners can object on religious grounds to a provision of U.S. President Barack Obama's healthcare law that requires closely held companies to provide health insurance that covers birth control. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: CIVIL UNREST RELIGION POLITICS HEALTH)
Demonstrators in support of abortion and contraceptive rights read on their mobile phones as the ruling for Hobby Lobby against their cause was announced outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington June 30, 2014. The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled that business owners can object on religious grounds to a provision of U.S. President Barack Obama's healthcare law that requires closely held companies to provide health insurance that covers birth control. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION POLITICS HEALTH CIVIL UNREST)
CHICAGO, IL - JUNE 30: Sister Caroline attends a rally with other supporters of religious freedom to praise the Supreme Court's decision in the Hobby Lobby, contraception coverage requirement case on June 30, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. Oklahoma-based Hobby Lobby, which operates a chain of arts-and-craft stores, challenged the provision and the high court ruled 5-4 that requiring family-owned corporations to pay for insurance coverage for contraception under the Affordable Care Act violated a federal law protecting religious freedom. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - JUNE 30: Religious freedom supporters hold a rally to praise the Supreme Court's decision in the Hobby Lobby, contraception coverage requirement case on June 30, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. Oklahoma-based Hobby Lobby, which operates a chain of arts-and-craft stores, challenged the provision and the high court ruled 5-4 that requiring family-owned corporations to pay for insurance coverage for contraception under the Affordable Care Act violated a federal law protecting religious freedom. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
The legal team representing craft-store chain Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. celebrates on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court after a ruling is announced in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, June 30, 2014. The Supreme Court dealt a blow to President Barack Obama's health-care law, ruling that closely held companies can claim a religious exemption from the requirement that they offer birth-control coverage in their worker health plans. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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“This decor is WRONG on SO many levels. There is nothing decorative about raw cotton…A commodity which was gained at the expense of African-American slaves," Rider wrote. "A little sensitivity goes a long way.” 

She ended by saying, “PLEASE REMOVE THIS ‘decor.’” 

Despite her intention, the viral post appears to have attracted more responses in support of Hobby Lobby.

“Oh good grief. It’s as if people are looking for an excuse to be outraged,” one commenter noted.

“I grew up working in the cotton patch alongside hard working folks black and white who made good money picking cotton to feed their families,” another remarked.

Someone else noted, in part, “None of the cotton you see here, or anywhere today, was picked by slaves.”

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